Problems with a PSU. 2 replies

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Polska

"The original one"

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19th September 2004

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#1 10 years ago

I'm helping out a friend who wants to place 4 HDD's into his computer. I already got them hooked up with a 5 connector Flat IDE Cable, but because the computer is pretty old (Pentium III ~ 650Mhz, 384Mb Ram), I swapped his B-Brand 235W PSU for a HKC 550W PSU. Nothing fancy but decent enough for most common text tasks I'd figure.

However, the computer wouldn't boot anymore and when I checked power settings under BIOS is stated that -5V Voltage was running at -6.14V Voltage, which was obviously causing the problem.

Does anyone know what is causing this problem or how to fix it? Much appreciated and thanks in advance.




The_Computer_Wizard

The Force is strong with him

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10th September 2006

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#2 10 years ago

not positive, but my advice would be to unplug everything but the board, check the power settings, turn it off plug in one more thing, check the power settings and so on until you find what hardware (or combination of it) is causing the problem that way you have a better idea of your problem




Freyr VIP Member

A2Files Staff

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6th February 2005

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#3 10 years ago

Polska;4218943I'm helping out a friend who wants to place 4 HDD's into his computer. I already got them hooked up with a 5 connector Flat IDE Cable, but because the computer is pretty old (Pentium III ~ 650Mhz, 384Mb Ram), I swapped his B-Brand 235W PSU for a HKC 550W PSU. Nothing fancy but decent enough for most common text tasks I'd figure.

However, the computer wouldn't boot anymore and when I checked power settings under BIOS is stated that -5V Voltage was running at -6.14V Voltage, which was obviously causing the problem.

Does anyone know what is causing this problem or how to fix it? Much appreciated and thanks in advance.

Personally I wouldn't worry about that to much. You say its a brand new PSU and those always have a burn in time where the voltage can be up to 10% off what it will be over the longer term. In addition a motherboard sensor isin't exactly a high quality multimeter. Its not unknown for them to display information thats off by some margin.

If the voltages were high enough to cause damage then I would have expected the board to blow when you plugged it in. As evicenced by you being in the BIOS the motherboard, chip and graphics output (which could be onboard or an external card) is working.

My guess would be that the hard drives aren't configured properly (are all the jumpers in the right places?) or your using SATA II drives on a rig that will only take SATA I.