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wargeek

The Internet ends at GF

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7th July 2003

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#1 14 years ago

Hey does anyone know where I can get a new processor for pretty cheap?I only have $20 right now and I get $50 a month and I dont want to have to save forever. I have a pentium 4 2.0 ghz right now and I want a p4 that is at least 3.0 ghz. Also, can someone explain to me what hyperthreading technology is? I was looking at some processors and the costed like 50 bucks more because they had "HT Technology." Is that something I need or can I live without it?




Μαjïç MushrøøM

I would die without GF

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29th November 2003

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#2 14 years ago

*moved to Tech Discussion*




blade64

Cheater Buster For -ACI-

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26th February 2005

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#3 14 years ago
Hyper-Threading (HTT = Hyper Threading Technology) is Intel's trademark for their implementation of the simultaneous multithreading technology on the Pentium 4 microarchitecture. It is basically a more advanced form of Super-threading that first debuted on the Intel Xeon processors and later added to Pentium 4 processors. The technology improves processor performance under certain workloads by providing useful work for execution units that would otherwise be idle, for example during a cache miss. The advantages of Hyper-Threading are listed as improved support for multi-threaded code, allowing multiple threads to run simultaneously, improved reaction and response time, and increased number of users a server can support. Hyper-Threading works by duplicating certain sections of the processor--those that store the architectural state--but not duplicating the main execution resources. This allows a Hyper-Threading equipped processor to pretend to be two "logical" processors to the host operating system, allowing the operating system to schedule two threads or processes simultaneously. Where execution resources in a non-Hyper-Threading capable processor are not used by the current task, and especially when the processor is stalled, a Hyper-Threading equipped processor may use those execution resources to execute the other scheduled task. (Reasons for the processor to stall include a cache miss, a branch misprediction and waiting for results of previous instructions before the current one can be executed.) Except for its performance implications, this innovation is transparent to operating systems and programs. All that is required to take advantage of Hyper-Threading is symmetric multiprocessing (SMP) support in the operating system, as the logical processors appear as standard separate processors. However, it is possible to optimise operating system behaviour on Hyper-Threading capable systems, such as the Linux techniques discussed in Kernel Traffic. For example, consider an SMP system with two physical processors that are both Hyper-Threaded (for a total of four logical processors). If the operating system's process scheduler is unaware of Hyper-Threading, it would treat all four processors the same. As a result, if only two processes are eligible to run, it might choose to schedule those processes on the two logical processors that happen to belong to one of the physical processors. Thus, one CPU would be extremely busy while the other CPU would be completely idle, leading to poor overall performance. This problem can be avoided by improving the scheduler to treat logical processors different from physical processors; in a sense, this is a limited form of the scheduler changes that are required for NUMA systems. According to Intel, the first implementation only used an additional 5% of the die area over the "normal" processor, yet yielded performance improvements of 15-30%.

there yea go, any new cpu that has come out from intel has HT in it, and if u get one that doesnt its gonna be an old cpu, so jus go wit the flow and get cpu wit HT in it




C38368

...burning angel wings to dust

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14th February 2004

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#4 14 years ago
blade64there yea go, any new cpu that has come out from intel has HT in it, and if u get one that doesnt its gonna be an old cpu, so jus go wit the flow and get cpu wit HT in it

No, not quite. There is at least one commonly available Prescott (2.4A, 533MHz) that lacks HT, an conversely most "older" Northwoods have HT. Moreover, the current talk is that HT will be dropped from the next "generation" of mainstream Intel chips, as dual-, multi- and many-core chips become a reality.