Question About Ram 14 replies

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marvinmatthew

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13th April 2005

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#1 14 years ago

I was reading a thread, and this question came to mind.

How much faster would 1Gig of PCI2700, vs. 1Gig of PCI400 be? Im asking for say a percentage of how much faster is would be.

How much of a difference does the "PCI" bit make on a user's FPS in a gaming experence. I always see people making such a big deal about this, and I honestly don't know what it means.




Yannick

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#2 14 years ago

Well, logic would say that 2700 is 192.856% (3DP) more than 1400, so that would give you the approximate speed difference?




rob.

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#3 14 years ago

"PCI" Ram??? Aye?




Yannick

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#4 14 years ago

*Whoops*

Sorry, I read that as PC2700 and PC1400. I don't know what the hell he's on about anymore either :confused:




Penguinous

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#5 14 years ago

marvinmatthewI was reading a thread, and this question came to mind.

How much faster would 1Gig of PCI2700, vs. 1Gig of PCI400 be? Im asking for say a percentage of how much faster is would be.

How much of a difference does the "PCI" bit make on a user's FPS in a gaming experence. I always see people making such a big deal about this, and I honestly don't know what it means.

I think you are a bit confused. Its "PC" not "PCI". They are entirely different things.

The PC400 (which is another name for PC3200) would be a bit faster than the PC2700 ram. It wouldn't make a world of difference but you probably would notice an increase in smoothness while using your computer. In the long run it is better to get the PC400 (PC3200) because programs are requiring faster and faster memory these days.




rob.

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#6 14 years ago

Acctually, DDR400 is the other name for PC3200 i beleive. ;)




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#7 14 years ago

DDR400 refers to the clock speed the RAM is running at. Also, I believe he was referring to PC4400 RAM as opposed to "PCI400". Well, PC4400 RAM runs at 550MHz clock speed, whilst PC2700 only weighs in at 333MHz. You do the maths. ;)




M!tch Advanced Member

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#8 14 years ago

copied this from a site hope its helpful,as you can see (i hope) PCxxxx refers to the bandwith of the memory

What is the difference between DDR SDRAM and SDRAM?

DDR SDRAM is a direct development of SDR (Single Data Rate) SDRAM. DDR SDRAM is simply the abbreviation of Double Data Rate; it doubles the bandwidth available for your system and works twice as quickly as standard SDRAM. For example, 266 MHz DDR SDRAM (twice 133 MHz) has a bandwidth of 2.1 Gb/s and is known as PC2100. The main difference between DDR SDRAM and standard SDRAM stems from the DDR which reads data on ascending and descending pulse edges of the clock signal. Standard SDRAM and SDR (Single Data Rate) SDRAM only route data on the ascending pulse edge of a signal. As a general rule, DDR modules transfer data twice as quickly as SDR SDRAM. For example, DDR memory gives a data transfer rate of 266 MHz instead of 133 MHz. What is the difference between DDR memory and RDRAM in terms of performances? DDR and Rambus DRAM are two new types of memory which should help to speed up PC performance. Both technologies have their supporters but differing results from extensive test benching have still to show which one will eventually win the day. Although the Rambus modules seem to transfer data more quickly, they have a higher latency (data transfer time) than the DDR modules. In other words, it takes longer to initiate the transfer of the first data with a Rambus transaction than with a DDR system. What's more, a DDR memory is less expensive than a RDRAM. What do PC100, PC133, PC1600, PC2100, PC2700 and PC3200 mean? To obtain certifications such as PC100, PC133, etc., a memory module must comply with industry standards concerning its use with a given type of system ( In SDRAM modules, the figures after the 'PC' indicate the speed of the system's frontside bus. In DDR modules, the figures after the 'PC' indicate the module's total bandwidth. Below is a brief summary of each type of memory. The PC100 SDRAM is designed for systems equipped with a 100 MHz frontside bus. It is used in many Pentium II, Pentium III, AMD K6-III, AMD Athlon, AMD Duron and Power Mac G4 systems. The PC133 SDRAM is designed for systems equipped with a 133 MHz frontside bus. It is used in many Pentium III B, AMD Athlon and Power Mac G4 systems. The PC1600 DDR memory is designed for systems equipped with a 100 MHz (200 MHz in DDRmode) frontside bus. '1600' refers to the module's bandwidth (i.e. the quantity of data that it transfers in one second), of 1.6 Gb per second. The PC1600 memory has been largely replaced by the fully compatible PC2100 memory. The PC2100 DDR memory is designed for systems equipped with a 133 MHz (266 MHz in DDR mode) frontside bus. '2100' refers to the module's bandwidth (i.e. the quantity of data that it transfers in one second), of 2.1 Gb per second. The PC2100 memory is used mostly in AMD Athlon, Pentium III and Pentium IV systems. The PC2700 DDR memory is designed for systems equipped with a 166 MHz (333 MHz in DDR mode) frontside bus. '2700' refers to the module's bandwidth (i.e. the quantity of data that it transfers in one second), of 2.7 Gb per second. The PC3200 DDR memory is designed for systems equipped with a 200 MHz (400 MHz in DDR mode) frontside bus. '3200' refers to the module's bandwidth (i.e. the quantity of data that it transfers in one second), of 3.2 Gb per second.


Thinking about it.



Chandu

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#9 14 years ago

M!tch, thanks for the info.




C38368

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#10 14 years ago
M!tchcopied this from a site hope its helpful,as you can see (i hope) PCxxxx refers to the bandwith of the memory

The number following the "PC" actually refers to the maximum theoretical throughput, as laid down in the JEDEC specification. At any given clock speed, RAM never hits that peak.




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