Questions about my new build 48 replies

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Shintsu

For the glory of Helghan

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9th April 2005

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#1 13 years ago

Alright, I've got my nice case and power supply already ordered and either here or on their way but I'm now to the next big decisions: Motherboard and Processor. My first question involves processors. I've been thinking about the Intel Core 2 Duos for quite some time now (Specifically the E6750 for $190 on Newegg), however I have been forced to take note of the AMD Phenom which is a quad core for only $200. My personal preferences have always been with Intel, however for such a price would it be worth it to go with the AMD this time? Obviously my PC is mainly a gaming machine with the other common uses as well, so I have no graphic design or anything like that I ever do. I do know the AMD Phenom has some glitches that can occur and cause some kind of performance hamper and that they're releasing a newer version with that glitch fixed. Is it worth it to wait for that revised version or stick with the E6750? My second question involves motherboards. Right now this is considering I go with the E6750. I have always thought the Nvidia graphics bridges were the way to go, especially if you were going with Nvidia graphics cards (as I plan to go) but I've heard some people say that they're no good. Is there any truth to this, and if so in what ways? This last bit is considering I went with an Nvidia bridge. I planned to spend over $100 on a motherboard (I've not seen any for less than $100 that were any good) so among these motherboards, what would you all recommend? Oh, and I do not intend on overclocking (I find it ignorant to void any factory warranty on your processor for a little bit more performance). I don't intend to buy two video cards at once, but I would like to eventually use it in SLI configuration. I particularly like this MSI or any of the Asus's (especially the one with true x16 SLI). Should I be concerned at all about getting the 1600 FSB?




EpicLoad

OMFG!!! Where am I?!?

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3rd June 2007

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#2 13 years ago

1. I would recommend going with the E6750, IMO it is one of the better processors out there right now. I really wanted to see the Phenom blow Intel out of the water, but it never happened; and although I'll wait for the Agena FX core, I'm not fully convinced that they will be any better at beating Intel.

2. The only reason that people think the nVidia bridges are no good is because of the processor support; Intel bridges have always had better processor support, but that's really just dealing with FSB speed. The 650i falls behind the P35 because the 650i does not support 1333MHz FSB without an overclock, while the 680i does.

If you were going to SLI I would highly recommend getting an nVidia 680i mobo since the bridge supports full x16 x16 data lanes, a full 16 lanes for the first two PCI-Ex slots; whereas the 650i only supports x8 x8.

If you were going to go with one of the motherboards on your list I would recommend one of the Asus boards or the EVGA board... These three... Newegg.com - EVGA 122-CK-NF68-A1 LGA 775 NVIDIA nForce 680i SLI ATX Intel Motherboard - Retail Newegg.com - ASUS Striker Extreme LGA 775 NVIDIA nForce 680i SLI ATX The Ultimate Gaming Motherboard - Retail Newegg.com - ASUS P5N32-E SLI LGA 775 NVIDIA nForce 680i SLI ATX Intel Motherboard - Retail

However; if you wanted 1600MHz FSB support (Which only applies to the future quad cores from Intel - the 45nm editions) then I would recommend the 780i motherboards, granted they are extremely expensive. IMO the extra money is not worth it - unless you really plan on spending a grand for an Intel quad. 780i North Bridge Motherboards




*The.Doctor

Trust me, I'm a Doctor

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25th November 2003

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#3 13 years ago
ShintsuI do know the AMD Phenom has some glitches that can occur and cause some kind of performance hamper and that they're releasing a newer version with that glitch fixed. Is it worth it to wait for that revised version or stick with the E6750?

If you want Phenom, wait for the new revision thats fixed. Right now that glitch (forget what it was exactly at the moment, something with the cache i think) is really hurting performance from what i hear, more specifically, its the patch for it that is really cutting down on performance. From what i hear once the new revision is released it could bring at least a 13% increase in performance.

Personally, i'm getting a AM2+ board and a X2 for my new build i'm working on and waiting for a revision of Phenom or the new dual cores before i upgrade the CPU.




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Modern Warfare

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1st January 2005

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#4 13 years ago

I agree that the E6750 is a good way to go. I also wished the Phenom would have done better, but for rather selfish reasons. I wanted it to succeed so Intel would consider making a true integrated quad, rather than these Core 2 quads. If the revised Phenom is right around the corner, you may want to wait and see how it fares, though I'm not expecting it will be effective enough to make a dent in Intel's sales. At best it might make Intel consider an integrated quad design, and that's only IF the revised ones sell well. I am inclined to feel Intel chipsets work best with Intel CPUs, esp if you want the best stability, reliability, and a cool running and easily OCable system. By easily OCable I mean with no heat or stability related issues, not merely performance alone. It's thinking about performance only that has many builders chasing down problems in the long run. The Nvidia chipsets, esp the 680i, run way hotter. I also feel there has yet to be enough proof of any better cost to performance ratio with SLI vs one good single card being swappped out when game tech warrants it. I know you say you don't want to OC, yet you want a 1600MHz FSB and the only way to get that without paying through the nose is by OCing. It's also very easy to OC an Intel CPU even without a voltage increase or aftermarket cooler. However doing it with an Nvidia chipset MB and no aftermarket cooler is a bad idea IMO. If however you feel you must go SLI for the odd game that releases, requiring it for a few months to use max settings at high res before being patched and/or better single card solutions are available (which is largely Nvidia's way of controlling the market), I would go with the more sanely priced 650i models. They run cooler than 680is (though not as cool as Intels) and there hasn't been much to validate that a full 16x by 16x gets you enough more perfomance to justify the expense.




Shintsu

For the glory of Helghan

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9th April 2005

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#5 13 years ago

I don't care about 1600 MHz FSB, I just saw a few mobos that supported it on Newegg and didn't know if that was what the future was going to. I like SLI because I can buy my nice video card for say $200 and then in a few months when it's old, I can buy it for maybe $120 and double my performance and prolong the time before I need a new vid card.




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Modern Warfare

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1st January 2005

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#6 13 years ago

That's what many, including myself were hoping for when SLI was still just in it's infancy. Truth is you get far from double the performance on most games using two video cards and with SLI, the games have to be written for it and written well for it to get even 70%-80% better performance. I'm not saying Crossfire is any better but at least it can run on any game without needing it to be written for it via their Supertiling mode.




Shintsu

For the glory of Helghan

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#7 13 years ago

I thought Crossfire wasn't anywhere near as simple as SLI? From what I've always been told, Crossfire was no where near as good as SLI and it was harder to configure. Sorry, but I really can't consider Crossfire. I don't know anything at all about ATI video cards and their lineup or anything to personally judge them myself. Plus, ATI and AMD are together now which further increases my preference of Nvidia over ATI.




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Modern Warfare

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#8 13 years ago

Again, not advocating ATI at all, in fact I have sworn them off altogether and will definitely go Nvidia next time. I was merely pointing out that Crossfire is actually more simplistic in ways and has evolved quite a bit. They no longer use external connectors and in fact can run with no connector on some MBs. I am not really a fan of either SLI or Crossfire and plan to build my next rig with one very burly card, probably a 9800GTX. I suspect it may be available by June of '08 from what I've read. It will likely run any game at max settings for the next 3 years even with a 1920x1200 res.




Shintsu

For the glory of Helghan

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#9 13 years ago

So among those mobos, what would you recommend if I was primarily going to use a single card with the possibility of SLI? (I suppose in other words, which one would do SLI and do it decently without costing me a fortune and being a good mobo otherwise?)




>Omen<

Modern Warfare

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#10 13 years ago

Given what you said, I'd say this is likely your best bet: [COLOR=blue]http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813131142[/COLOR] Keep in min though it's only got two PCI slots, meaning you'll only have use of one of them for a sound card if you SLI on it.