Quick linux question 12 replies

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Guest

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#1 10 years ago

i want to try linux out properly ive used a couple of usb flash linux's and i liked them a lot and wanted to install ubuntu on my laptop i have xp on here but i wanted to no if i used the live cd and installed from that wouldd i lose xp and any files on there when i do it as ive got like 10gb free in here

thanks for any help you give i want to try it properly as a mate at college is trying to show me that linux is 100X better than windows




Dalt

Also known as general_mario

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7th November 2007

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#2 10 years ago

you can have both ubuntu and windows installed. just create a separate partition for ubuntu. if you already have two partitions, use the one where the windows is not installed. resizing partitions might end up with you loosing all your data from that partition, but if done properly all your data should be safe.




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#3 10 years ago

well i only have 1 partition at the moment so will ubuntu create one for me or do i need a seperate program to do that




arcadeplayer987

Revenge was here.

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25th April 2007

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#4 10 years ago
rookiebombtech;4155358well i only have 1 partition at the moment so will ubuntu create one for me or do i need a seperate program to do that

Get Partition Magic 8 to create a new partition




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#5 10 years ago

thanks ill look into it now then




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#6 10 years ago

Don't overwrite the partition like I did though. It's a very common mistake.




Freyr VIP Member

A2Files Staff

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6th February 2005

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#7 10 years ago

You don't need to buy Partition Magic, the installer will present options for partitioning the drive as part of the installation.

You should run defrag and backup essential files first, however.




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#8 10 years ago

Freyr;4155669You don't need to buy Partition Magic, the installer will present options for partitioning the drive as part of the installation.

You should run defrag and backup essential files first, however.

ok then i had a look at the installer but it wanted to over write my current partition i thin kso i exited and now im running the defrag on windows

also on the installer it said media/sda1 and media/sda2 as the partitions is this correct as i dont wanna mess up my windows install




Dragokatzov

GF is my bext friend *hugs GF*

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24th January 2005

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#9 10 years ago

forget partition magic parted magic is all you need Parted Magic




C38368

...burning angel wings to dust

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14th February 2004

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#10 10 years ago

You don't need any third party software to install Ubuntu alongside Windows. It runs something (I think it's qparted or some derivative thereof) that will allow you to nearly resize the Windows partition and create a new partition (two, actually) for Ubuntu.

Very important to defrag first. Just do it from Windows.

Regarding partitions, these are shown in Linux differently than Windows. Whereas the root directory on Windows is usually represented as C:\, in Linux it shows as /dev/sda1, for example.

/dev/sda1 is just a device. Forget about the /dev portion; it's irrelevant other than to show you where in the structure of the OS this device "lives." There are a handful of device types, but in my expeience sd* is the most common any longer. It's nothing more than a SATA disk. Older PATA drives were hd* devices.

Now then, the third letter (/dev/sda) designtates the physical. Thus, /dev/sda is the first SATA drive. The number at the end (/dev/sda1) tells you which partition the device is.

Thus, if you take a single drive with Windows on it, then install Ubuntu alongside that, you might end up with Linux telling you that /dev/sda1 is an NTFS partition of some random size (your Windows installation), while /dev/sda2 is an ext3 partition, which is what Ubuntu is running on.

It isn't quite that simple, but close enough. Hope that make some sort of sense...




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