requesting info on how to format a HD to FAT32 10 replies

  • 1
  • 2

Please wait...

super6-4

GF is my bext friend *hugs GF*

50 XP

26th July 2004

0 Uploads

960 Posts

0 Threads

#1 11 years ago

i got my seagate external harddrive 160g today to backup my ps3 becuz im going to change out the HD. seeing that it requires the backup device to be in FAT32 format, i went the DOS method. after about 1 1/2 2 hours it was down and said too big cant be done. ok so then i try a third party software and it put my external HD to FAT32 but now i only have like 39 gb?? where the rest go. i was reading something about having to break it up into partitions or something. because FAT32 only allows a certain amount or something, if anyone can spare some info or walk through on this much appreciated. have win 7 if they helps any.




Junk angel

Huh, sound?

166,880 XP

28th January 2007

0 Uploads

15,678 Posts

0 Threads

#2 11 years ago

Well Fat32 most likely only support up to 40GB of space. Try deleting the current FAT32 partition to reclaim all 160GB back and do instead four partitions in FAT32 format.




Zurahn

N/A

50 XP

26th October 2009

0 Uploads

14 Posts

0 Threads

#3 11 years ago
Junk angel;5169103Well Fat32 most likely only support up to 40GB of space. Try deleting the current FAT32 partition to reclaim all 160GB back and do instead four partitions in FAT32 format.

Not entirely true. Windows implementations of FAT32 have had quirks that cause arbitrary limitations. Windows XP has a limit for formatting FAT32 to 32GB (but can read disks larger), but Windows ME/98x does not. Third-party utilities can format disks far larger than 160GB using FAT32 (though not necessarily recommended).

What I'd recommend using is a Linux Live CD such as Ubuntu or just the GParted Live CD and loading up gparted or qtparted to format, and it will be able to do the full disk.

If you insist on using a Windows utility, here is an option that can do it through the command prompt (though I have not used this utility specifically): Ridgecrop Consultants Ltd

Do note, though, there is a limitation to the FAT32 filesystem that limits individual files to a maximum of 4GB.




Freyr Advanced Member

A2Files Staff

46,877 XP

5th February 2005

11 Uploads

4,275 Posts

0 Threads

#4 11 years ago
Junk angel;5169103Well Fat32 most likely only support up to 40GB of space. Try deleting the current FAT32 partition to reclaim all 160GB back and do instead four partitions in FAT32 format.

FAT32 supports upto a 200GB drive. There are many free tools out there that may work but I don't have any experiance with them, personally i've always used Parition Magic for partition management.

Personally, if I were you i'd just get myself a copy of Partition Magic, do the job and then put the disc on the shelf for next time you want to use it.




Von II

aka noobst3R

50 XP

16th June 2008

0 Uploads

4,339 Posts

0 Threads

#5 11 years ago

Or use Easeus, just like PM, but free. I've used it several times, it's good.

Easeus Partition Master Home Edition - Free software downloads and software reviews - CNET Download.com




ConstanceJill

Huh yeah, whatever ^^

38,782 XP

6th December 2006

0 Uploads

3,246 Posts

1 Threads

#6 11 years ago
Freyr;5169439FAT32 supports upto a 200GB drive.

Actually it's up to 2TB per FAT32 partition. And Partition Magic also has weird restrictions on FAT32 size, even though it goes higher than Windows' standard utilities.




Sgt. D. Pilla

Uber Geek

50 XP

23rd October 2007

0 Uploads

3,473 Posts

0 Threads

#7 11 years ago
Actually it's up to 2TB per FAT32 partition.

Actually your both wrong, its 8TB...as per KB314463 (Using default cluster size of 32KB, using a widely unsupported cluster size of 64KB allows upto 16TB drives under FAT32)

KB ArticleThe maximum disk size is approximately 8 terabytes when you take into account the following variables: The maximum possible number of clusters on a FAT32 volume is 268,435,445, and there is a maximum of 32 KB per cluster, along with the space required for the file allocation table (FAT). [/QUOTE] And Windows XP (Thus Vista, and Win 7 since they have less FAT** support) cannot format drives larger then 32GB, it can read, but can't format - and even formatting is subject to limitations.
KB ArticleYou cannot format a volume larger than 32 gigabytes (GB) in size using the FAT32 file system during the Windows XP installation process. Windows XP can mount and support FAT32 volumes larger than 32 GB (subject to the other limits), but you cannot create a FAT32 volume larger than 32 GB by using the Format tool during Setup
Note: the Format tool used in setup and MMC once the OS is running is identical, a dos tool, MMC and setup is mearly two differnt GUIs for it. That same KB confirms what I just said about it being the same tool, with two different GUIs...(Freyer and other MCPs of course already know this...) [QUOTE=KB Article]NOTE: When you attempt to format a FAT32 partition that is larger than 32 GB during the Windows XP installation process, the format operation fails near the end of the process, and you may receive the following error message: Logical Disk Manager: Volume size too big.

Use a Windows 98/ME setup disk to format the drive, or otherwise obtain 'FDisk' the format utility used by said OS's - this will allow you to format the drives. You need an old tool to format them, not a new one, since FAT** is all but phased out.




Freyr Advanced Member

A2Files Staff

46,877 XP

5th February 2005

11 Uploads

4,275 Posts

0 Threads

#8 11 years ago

I should have said that FAT32 supports at least up to 200GB. That's the largest FAT32 partition i've ever been able to create or have seen running. (not that there is a burning need for FAT32 drives, but hey.)




ConstanceJill

Huh yeah, whatever ^^

38,782 XP

6th December 2006

0 Uploads

3,246 Posts

1 Threads

#9 11 years ago
Sgt. D. Pilla;5170528Actually your both wrong, its 8TB...as per KB314463 (Using default cluster size of 32KB, using a widely unsupported cluster size of 64KB allows upto 16TB drives under FAT32)

It seems that 8TB is only a theorical limitation, since you actually can't use so many clusters due to the limitations of the MBR itself, which only has a 32bits field for sector count... hence the actual real limitation of 2TB, since, as far as I know, all HDDs use 512 bytes per sector — that is, according to wikipedia.




Sgt. D. Pilla

Uber Geek

50 XP

23rd October 2007

0 Uploads

3,473 Posts

0 Threads

#10 11 years ago

FAT32 uses 32bit fields, hence fat'32'. It's not a theoretical limit, you can format drives with the FAT32 filesystem and a 32kb cluster size, and it will support 8TB, easy. There is no theory in it. When you format a drive you can choose its cluster size, that is what will determine if its 2, 8 or 16TB limit.




  • 1
  • 2