Router and switching hub 8 replies

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Planemech

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16th August 2006

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#1 12 years ago

Hi, What is the difference between a router and a switching hub? Thanks, Planemech




marvinmatthew

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13th April 2005

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#2 12 years ago

Routers have a builtin firewall, hubs gernerally don't.

Most routers limit you to four wired connections, hubs vary in size, but have the ability to have more wired connections.

There are wireless routers, but no wireless hubs.




Bs|Archaon

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#3 12 years ago

A switch is basically a central location for a network, it's a hell of a lot easier than daisy-chaining computers together as only the switch and whichever computers are being used have to be on, rather than everything.

A router is basically a switch with extra features. One of which is firewall as Marvin said, along with stuff like access filtering, port forwarding and whatnot. Basically a router is a small switch with a bunch of security features. If you want both, you can hook up a switch to one of the (normally 4) ports on a router; giving you the router's features with the amount of sockets that a switch provides.




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#4 12 years ago

PlanemechHi, What is the difference between a router and a switching hub? Thanks, Planemech[/quote] Routers send data according to IP address, hubs send data according to MAC address. As such, routers tend to be used to connect machines to the Internet or larger corporate intranets, both of which use the TCP/IP protocol. They can also serve as a protocol 'translator', allowing devices which use different protocols (such as Apple' AppleTalk protocol) to communicate with each other. Some models (i.e. combination devices designed for home use) also incorporate some form of broadband modem, as well as an internal switch and in some cases a wireless access point.

Switches are used to connect smaller numbers of machines together, such as those in a house or small office.

Also, you can't have "switching hubs". You either get a switch, or a hub. There is a difference. [QUOTE=Bs|Archaon]A router is basically a switch with extra features. One of which is firewall as Marvin said, along with stuff like access filtering, port forwarding and whatnot. Basically a router is a small switch with a bunch of security features.

Erm...no. They're technically very different devices. The router routes data by IP, the switch is part of a circuit switched network. (Hence the name.)




Bs|Archaon

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#5 12 years ago

And (typical uses and the router's additional features aside) they both essentially do the same thing, do they not? ;)




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#6 12 years ago
Bs|ArchaonAnd (typical uses and the router's additional features aside) they both essentially do the same thing, do they not? ;)

Nope. The job of a switch is to switch the circuit of a local area network in order to accomodate multiple data transmissions simultaneously. (Or as near as is possible, anyway.) A router does no such thing - it simply sends data directly to the next router along, establishing a "daisy chain" until the data reaches its destination.

Without getting into semantics, although they perform a similar role (in Layman's terms, you could say that routers are the "big brothers" of switches - although they operate in a completely different fashion), functionally the devices are as chalk and cheese to each other.




Bs|Archaon

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#7 12 years ago

That's what I meant, in laymans terms a router does networking with security and a switch does networking.




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#8 12 years ago

No worries, just explaining the difference between the devices.

(I'm quite anal about networking terminology. A year of class with my networking tutor will do that to you. :lookaround:)




Bs|Archaon

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#9 12 years ago

Hehe, I know. And it's interesting to have the differences explained to me without even taking the effort of Googling. :p For most people that's about as complicated as it gets (or needs to get though).