Series of dying hard drives 37 replies

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N88TR

Old school pimp

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10th February 2004

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#1 10 years ago

My first died this summer, a Seagate 300 gig. Next was my Western Digital 500. I'm finally left with my WD 250 gig. Arrggh!!!

I do backups all the time so thankfully I've not lost any data.

My question is what makes HDs die? I think my case is properly ventilated; I have a back 120 mm fan, and a 120 mm top fan. My case is a ThermalTake VA8000BWS. Any suggestions for me?

Thank you very much.




foodmaniac2003

Gelato pwns all

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11th March 2006

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#2 10 years ago

How old were the hard drives?




N88TR

Old school pimp

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10th February 2004

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#3 10 years ago

The first was about 2 years old the others were brand new, less than 2 months old each, same for my current 250 gigger.




EpicLoad

OMFG!!! Where am I?!?

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4th June 2007

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#4 10 years ago

How often do you format? I know that a lot of formats can aid in the killing of an HDD.




Dragokatzov

GF is my bext friend *hugs GF*

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24th January 2005

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#5 10 years ago

hmm, have you checked the voltages got the power calbed for you hard drives to see if its over/under volted? doesn't happen a lot, but a bad groud ona voltage regulator in your PSU isn;t good




Freyr VIP Member

A2Files Staff

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6th February 2005

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#6 10 years ago

It's actually quite hard to kill a HDD, I don't think I have had one actually fail since a 40MB drive at the beginning of time.

Did you get any smart warnings before the drive(s) died? That, or loud clicking noises from the drive?




>Omen<

Modern Warfare

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1st January 2005

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#7 10 years ago

Your PS could be on the fritz. Check overall voltage stability with a good utility.




Crimson_Might

I want to be like the Admins

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2nd January 2004

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#8 10 years ago

Dust, power surges, vibrations, physical damage, age, manufacturing defects are all causes why a hard drive might fail.

On the contrary to what people say there is no proof that formatting causes damage. What do you think you do when you download something, delete it, and download something else? Silly people...




>Omen<

Modern Warfare

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1st January 2005

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#9 10 years ago

Yeah the average HD can handle tons of drive wiping/installing because it's way different from an optical drive having magnetic particles rather than the film in DVDs that are etched/"burned". Most well built ones are quite resistant to dust though as they are factory sealed. That's why they have a label on them that voids warranty if it's broken.




Freyr VIP Member

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#10 10 years ago

Crimson_Might;4128064Dust, power surges, vibrations, physical damage, age, manufacturing defects are all causes why a hard drive might fail.

On the contrary to what people say there is no proof that formatting causes damage. What do you think you do when you download something, delete it, and download something else? Silly people...

It is possible that a format can kill a drive. If its been sitting around for a long period of time only accessing small portions of the drive and then has to perform a format or build a RAID array then its possible.

Google did a study on their drives and they found this was the case, so I'd say this is ample proof. :)