Spreading thermal paste 27 replies

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jimbo_0002

Yep

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2nd August 2007

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#1 9 years ago

Hey guys i recently just got a few new parts (mobo, ram & cpu cooler) And I have never replaced a cooler before, im a pretty intelligent guy read all manuals i can find and it looks really simple the only thing i wanted to get opinions on is spreading thermal paste, I have seen various ways eg putting blobs over each core, putting a few lines down and spreading over entire surface. Now all im really after is the best way to do this i have read threads with views disclaiming the spread saying its not the best way yet most articles i come across they all spread the thermal paste.

So any serious modders/OC'ers give me the right direction and/or any hints and tips??




C38368

...burning angel wings to dust

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14th February 2004

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#2 9 years ago

The best thing to do is squirt out a line that runs perpendicular to the cores if you have a dual-die CPU. If it's a single die CPU, then a blob of paste the size of a rice grain in the center works just fine.

You need to spread (paper thin; use a razor blade) if you're applying to a bare core. Nobody makes naked die CPUs any longer, but this is necessary for every northbridge I've seen and some southbridges as well.

Dual-die application. I believe this should run parallel to the text on an Intel chip, or from notch-side to notch-side for LGA775. I presume the same would hold true for LGA1366. Not sure about anything from AMD. w9a9oi.jpg




Smitty025

The local Paultard

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24th May 2003

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#3 9 years ago

I've had luck with making an X shape out of very thin lines of paste. I read a review some time ago that suggested that method. I haven't compared methods myself, but it seems to work well enough. I've managed to get my Q6600 from 2.4GHz to 3.45Ghz with temps around 39-41C. I could go higher, but I don't feel like experimenting with voltages and memory speeds/timings.

Remember, though, you don't want a thick layer of paste between the heatsink and the built in chip heatsink. You just want to fill in any minor imperfections on the surface.




Mastershroom VIP Member

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18th November 2004

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#4 9 years ago

I have a problem with that on my mobile processors, actually. The shiny die surfaces are bare, and attempting to spread the paste just ends up with paste all over the razor or credit card, and with bare patches all over the die. I usually just put a small dab on the center of the die, and put the heatsink on, letting it squish the paste evenly over the surface. It's been working surprisingly well for such a brute force method. My T9500 never goes over 60C under the 1024M test of WPrime.




C38368

...burning angel wings to dust

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14th February 2004

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#5 9 years ago
Zamamee;4924095I have a problem with that on my mobile processors, actually. The shiny die surfaces are bare, and attempting to spread the paste just ends up with paste all over the razor or credit card, and with bare patches all over the die. I usually just put a small dab on the center of the die, and put the heatsink on, letting it squish the paste evenly over the surface. It's been working surprisingly well for such a brute force method. My T9500 never goes over 60C under the 1024M test of WPrime.

Practice, man, practice! You're not doing it right! ;)

The trick actually does involve transferring most of the paste onto the razor and spreading it again. You'll have a fair amount of waste doing it this way, but it's way better than a burnt chip. Modern dice aren't so bad, but some of those old chips had massive dice that you could not use the "squish" method on if you wanted your computer to be working 30 seconds after power on!




Mastershroom VIP Member

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18th November 2004

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#6 9 years ago

Tell that to the Dell technician who came to my house for a warranty motherboard replacement. When he removed the heatsink and processor, he wiped off the paste I had applied, from both the CPU die and heatsink surface. When he put the thing back together, he just slapped them both back on totally dry. Luckily nothing really happened. That would have been fun explaining to Dell. "The technician replaced the motherboard alright, but also cooked my CPU in its own juices."




Mr. Pedantic

I would die without GF

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8th October 2006

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#7 9 years ago

So. Do we actually have any consensus about what is the best method? Cross? Line? Blob-in-the-middle-and-hope-it-reaches-everywhere?




*The.Doctor

Trust me, I'm a Doctor

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25th November 2003

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#8 9 years ago

If you have a HDT heatsink (heatpipe direct touch) such as my Xigmatek, the best way is actually not to apply it to the CPU, but to apply the paste to the sink. Just applying a small amount on the CPU like shown above doesn't work for HDT sinks, the paste won't squeeze out enough to cover the entire core because more is needed to fill the gaps between the heatpipes and the surrounding aluminum base. I found this out myself, just doing it the standard way the paste was only covering about 3/4 of the core.

For these types of sinks, you need to apply the paste to the part of the base between the heatpipes, putting a small line of paste on each side.

xigmatekHDTS1283_base.jpg

^ The paste goes on as two small lines on the two sections of the base on both sides of the center heatpipe. That way it evenly spreads out across the core and all three pipes.

Just thought i would mention that as i know a few other people here are using Xigmatek heatsinks.




jimbo_0002

Yep

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2nd August 2007

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#9 9 years ago

I'm running a Q6600 so 4 cores, so would a thin cross do the trick??

And no Im not using a Xigmatek I have gone for a Cooler master V8, as price vs performance was the best out of what i had on offer.




Mastershroom VIP Member

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#10 9 years ago

I thought quad-cores were inline, not 2x2?