* testing cpu over-clocking temps and limits * 12 replies

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XLove & MutilationX

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#1 13 years ago

hey i was wondering if any of the overclocking people here could assist me. I'm in the middle of testing the over-clocking capabilities of a cpu on a seperate computer of mine [not this one here] and i'm wondering what would be the absolute maximum safe temperatures for a Northcott 2.5 ghz.

right now, i have it pushed up to 110mhz for fsb [from 100mhz], core speed at 2774.2 mhz,bus speed at 443.9 mhz and internal cpu temperature sitting at between 41-44 c. how much further do you think i could possibly push it before the cpu temperature becomes a bit too 'much' ?

thanks in advance




Kilobyte

What does the Fox say?

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#2 13 years ago

As long as it stays below 50 degrees celcius, it should be fine. With Intel processors, stability is a greater problem than heat. As I understand it, newer Intels can take up to 70 degrees celcius, and still run stable.

You may be able to crank it up to 133mhz fsb. I wouldn't go any higher.

If you have some serious cooling, and a motherboard that can handle it, you may be able to push 166mhz fsb. Maybe...

Just out of curiosity, where did you get the idea that it was a "Northcott"?




C38368

...burning angel wings to dust

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#3 13 years ago

Northcott? That's not a valid core (your choices are Northwood and Prescott). I suspect you meant Northwood, and an old one at that, given your 100MHz system clock (this makes for a 400MHz FSB). To run at 2.5GHz, you're looking at a multi of 25 (!!!)--yeah, that's huge. You're doing pretty good on temps. What you need to be worried about with the Northwood core is SNDS--Sudden Northwood Death Syndrome. Running a Vcore higher than 1.65-1.7V is a pretty sure way to inflict it, though I can't say that I've ever heard of excessive temps causing it. Remember that P4s do sport thermal throttling. At any rate, MBM5 is reporting 40°C with a +10°C modifer on my 2.4C (272MHz FSB/3.265GHz effective) at near-idle. I used to run a 3E Prescott at 250MHz FSB/3.75GHz effective at about 50°C idle/59°C load without issue. Anyways... once you start hitting closer to 50°C at idle, I'd be a little worried. Until then, you're doing pretty good. Just bear in mind that you're not going to get a super good overclock out of that chip unless it's unlocked--the multi is just too high.




XLove & MutilationX

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#4 13 years ago

actually, i've had my processor for just over 2 years - i desperately do want to upprade it, but not before i push the current one to its absolute limit i meant Northwood, not Northcott. sorry but it was an obvious typo, as i do know my processors.to be on the safe side, i am going to push it as far as i can to up to 44-47 on idle,hope for the best and attempt to get my fsb to 133mhz. is there anything additional i should keep my eyes on or attempt to alter stock clock ?

thanks for the help thus far.




C38368

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#5 13 years ago
XLove & MutilationXactually, i've had my processor for just over 2 years - i desperately do want to upprade it, but not before i push the current one to its absolute limit

That's the spirit!!! coolx.gif At any rate, what you're probably going to encounter is a situation where your chip ceases to be stable, rather than one where it threatens to overheat. When I was playing with a 2.4B, I couldn't get it much past 2.6GHz or so before it just hit a wall. At that point, no amount of voltage helped (and it got HOT when I tried 1.6V). I suggest that you download Memtest86+. It's an excellent low-level program that you can boot into and use to test the stability of your CPU and memory. Usually, errors in tests 1-4 are CPU-related, and errors in tests 5-8 are memory related.




XLove & MutilationX

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#6 13 years ago

yeah. like i said, i am more then likely going to upgrade to atleast a 3.0 within the next month so i know that i should consider myself extremely lucky if i'm even able to reach an improvement of say..2.7.ultimately, really, any attempts at overclocking really arent worth it because as said, i'm more then likely going to invest in a Northwood 3.0, as well as a nice set of pc3200 of ram to go with it anyway.but in the meantime, i will continue to push the cpu that i have, just to experiment and have fun with it.

thanks for the link to that program. i think i've heard of it before. I've been using a comination of cpu-z and my mobo's overclocking interface during all of this experimentation. thanks for your help, its much appreciated..




C38368

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#7 13 years ago

CPU-Z is useful, especially back up your claims :) Memtest is nice because you don't need to boot into Windows and wait for it to crash to see if you're unstable yet or not. Where do you plan on getting a new chip from?




XLove & MutilationX

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#8 13 years ago

well i was looking at a Canadian pc site that i frequented a lot when i first built this pc, its like the equivalent to newegg in the U.S..

www.ncix.com

the cpu chip that i have in mind is an Intel P4 3.2ghz E at 800FSB 1mb cache

and also, if you may be wondering,here is the description and specs of my mobo..

http://www.msi.com.tw/program/products/mainboard/mbd/pro_mbd_detail.php?UID=612

so what do you think? i really value your input so thanks again for your time,etc. :nodding:




C38368

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#9 13 years ago

Your mobo's pretty good. Nothing special, but not an ECS, either. A 3.2E will definitely be a step up from a 2.5, but it'll also be quite a bit warmer. You won't be able to reuse the heatsink you have now. In fact, I'd recommend buying an aftermarket heatsink: it'll cost more, but cooler better and run quieter (two things you'll come to appreciate with a Prescott, especially if you start to overclock it). I had a 3E for awhile that I was overclocking quite a bit... I sold the chip, but I know who has it now and I suspect that I can get it to 4GHz stable. Are you looking to overclock? Prescotts start to come into their own at around 3.2GHz (until that point Northwoods tend to turn in better numbers). Either way, you should be fine with that board and a new 3.2E, and I doubt you'll regret the purchase. Just be sure to consider a good aftermarket HSF, instead of the stock POS that Intel will give you.




XLove & MutilationX

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#10 13 years ago

yeah, i know that the stock heatsink for the Prescotts are pretty much crap, and i already have one in mind as i know that a Prescott cpu itself can run up to around 50 degrees just on idle.

i have this one in mind..

http://www.ncix.com/products/index.php?sku=12760&vpn=XP-90&manufacture=THERMALRIGHT

it doesnt include a fan however. care to suggest a decent fan to go with the heatsink ? I've had my mobo for not even a full year yet and i didnt pay more then $110! it won a "best of" and "editor's choice" award for 2003 on Tom's Hardware site - so i certainly have no complaints about the mobo.I'll probably replace it next spring.

at this time, i dont think i will overclock anything - but certainly would not mind investing in overclockable ram in case i decide to experiment as i have with my current cpu/ram.




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