The Borders around LCD TVs. 4 replies

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Kilobyte

What does the Fox say?

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23rd November 2002

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#1 11 years ago

An odd thread. I have been wondering about what traits one needs to consider when buying LCD TVs. Recently I have become aware of the need to consider aesthetics.

Now, several TVs have this black shiny plastic coating around the outside of the screen. Several people have mentioned that it is distracting. While the uglier Dull black borders do not distract from the image.

Now, I am wondering what effect different levels of light, or different lighting environments would have on these two surfaces. With the dull surface, you don't have to worry about it.

Yet, in dark room, how distracting would the light from around the screen be, or would it be drowned out by the TV itself?

In a well lit room, how distracting would it be?

How about in a sunlit room? Would the plastic still be so distracting in the near even light of natural Sunlight?

Is there any of you that could conduct experiments on one such TV, with a sheen around the screen, regarding the visibility of light?




>Omen<

Modern Warfare

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1st January 2005

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#2 11 years ago

Your confusing terms a bit there. The thin part of the screen shell around the edge that encases the LCD panel is called the bezel. Furthermore when you say "shiny plastic coating" some could mistake your meaning a screen coating of some kind. That shiny black look is usually referred to as "piano laquer black", and is part of the molding process of the plastic not a coating. That being said, I find it is relative to the type of lighting you use as to whether you'll see any distractions from light being reflected off the shiny plastic. If you have any light bright enough to do so in front of the screen it's not very good use of room lighting. Indirect lighting is the way to go. Floor lamps, wall sconces or track lights that spill light onto the walls and/or ceiling are much less likely to cause glare on your screen and unwanted reflections elsewhere. A cheaper way to do it is change the shade on lamps your using and put a 3-way socket/bulb in them. I tend to prefer black bezels for contrast around the screen and lighting that is right in between reading bright and no lighting at all. Basically light enough to see the walls but fairly dimmly. The piano laquer bezels can actually reflect more light from the screen itself than your room lighting if you go too dark with your room lighting, so keep that in mind if you should happen to get one. They also show fingerprints and dust worse than those with a more dull finish. Recently I set up a Samsung 245BW for a friend though which matches his piano laquer black Sonata II case and after watching a movie and playing a game on it I honestly was not distracted by any reflections. It's not as bad as you might think with the right level of room lighting.




jimbo_0002

Yep

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#3 11 years ago

Hey i got a 42" samsung plasma tv with a shiny black gloss casing (if thats what it is called) and it has a big blue LED button in the center under the screen

During the day with natural lighting i dont get distracted by the shine or anything,

But the other night i was watching a movie and it was reflecting off the gloss and kinda projecting the screen on the wall anyway that distracted from my movie for a bit but once the movie got exiteing again i forgot all about it

Im just saying if your deep into your movie or tv you are watching you shouldnt notice and little bits of shine or reflection.

Just my opinion:)




Kilobyte

What does the Fox say?

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#4 11 years ago

The Bezel. Let's not upset >Omen<. Thank you though. Especially your comment about the natural lighting. Do you notice more shine during the day, the night, or during the middle of the evening/morning, with less natural light, and more artificial light.

Personally, I am not easily distracted, and I find the "Piano Lacquer Black" effect more attractive.

>Omen<;4004591Your confusing terms a bit there. The thin part of the screen shell around the edge that encases the LCD panel is called the bezel. Furthermore when you say "shiny plastic coating" some could mistake your meaning a screen coating of some kind. That shiny black look is usually referred to as "piano laquer black", and is part of the molding process of the plastic not a coating.[/quote] The "Border" is called the Bezel. It isn't a coating, but part of the molding process. The effect is often called "Piano Lacquer Black". Gotchya.

Your not the first one to tell me this... I'll get it down eventually. However, it is difficult to remember the technical terms, when you have to communicate in layman's terms.

[QUOTE=>Omen<;4004591]It's not as bad as you might think with the right level of room lighting.

I work at Wal-Mart (Incase you couldn't tell), and many people come in saying that the TV would be very distracting. Ofcourse, Wal-Mart does not have the greatest lighting for watching TV.

Having become aware of this, I want to understand what the problem is, and how best to consider it, when making a sale. I get a variety of customers in, with a variety of lighting conditions in their homes. Many of which would not be able to understand how to adjust the lighting properly. Even though you understand, and I would be able to figure it out now. There are still people who just cannot grasp the concept.

We have had a lot of TVs returned, for a variety of reasons. we are trying to cut back on those returns by educating the customer. Mostly in regards to the need for what we refer to as a HD "Box", or High-Def Receiver. Aside from that, aesthetic concerns come into play. As well as cost. There may well be other issues, that are not yet known.

Computers are my area of expertise, but even there I still use a CRT display. I'm still learning about LCDs, and TVs in general.

In considering a line that would address this matter, perhaps something like this,...

I noticed you picked out the TVs with the Shiny Black border (layman's terms for "Piano Lacquer Black, Bezel"). You may want to consider the lighting conditions in your home. Some simple techniques, such as repositioning a lamp, may prevent the distracting glare effect. Also, having a nice level lighting is very important, you don't want it to be too dark.

This confirms the concept that I understood, but shows some error in the explanation method I was using yesterday.

In a pitch black room, the "Piano Lacquer Black, Bezel" would pick up nearly every light source, and would likely be distracting. Given that light seems brighter in the dark. Not so much so in a room lit by sunlight, where the light fairly equals out.

I do have a few more questions on indirect lighting. I understand the concept, but I am not sure as to the range, or angle that might need to be taken into account.

Take for instance, a Ceiling fan in a mobile home. Likely these are in the very center of the living room, with a low ceiling. Many use multiple bulbs in sockets that point outwards. --/|\--. Often without a cover for the bulb itself. Is it feasible that such a light source could reflect noticeably? How about an over-the-shoulder lamp?




Enterprise2002

Your friendly nutcase

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15th December 2002

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#5 11 years ago

I have a Samsung 27" TV which I think has the black effect you're talking about. It doesn't distract me at all, and when its turned off I still get a nice little shine from around the edges so it doesn't look like a complete 'dead zone' as it were.

I like the effect, myself. I think its just completely up to personal preference. I often play on my Xbox 360 at night, in a room which is supposed to be lit by sunlight..... so it goes dark... even at these times I don't find it distracting, maybe I'm just too focused on the image that is on the screen and now what's dancing around the edges when its turned on?