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carl4286

Revenge was here.

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14th December 2004

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#1 13 years ago

I got my new BTX system built (I waited a week for parts, but I got a deal), and I have a few questions: My Rosewill 500W ATX 2.01 power supply with dual +12V rails. Now, I don't know much about voltages, which componants use which rails, and what is a good voltage and what is bad. 'Intel Desktop Utilities' is reporting my voltages at +12V= 12.438V, +5V= 5.156, +3.3V= 3.317V. These seem high (especially the +12V). Are they dangerous or acceptable? Also, if my power supply has dual +12V rails, shouldn't I be seeing two voltages? Second question: I got 'Intel Precision Cooling' finally working correctly, but man is it dumb. My processor is idling at 38C (not bad for a 3.4GHz prescott), and is running my 92mm heatsink fan at an ear-pleasing 820 RPM. For some reason it is running my two 80mm Vantec Stealth exhaust fans at 2200 RPM (they're rated at 2050 RPM). It's still quieter than my old PC, but I would feel more comfortable lowering the exhaust fans by a few hundred RPM and speeding up my heatsink fan. Is there a good (free) program I can use that will monitor temps, preferably voltages, and allow me to alter fan speeds? Thanks.




Agentlaidlaw

Pie

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21st February 2005

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#2 13 years ago

You should really change your sig. But this might be of use for the fan thing http://www.intel.com/design/motherbd/active.htm




carl4286

Revenge was here.

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#3 13 years ago

Oh yeah, forgot about my sig. That's the same as the 'Intel Desktop Utilities' that I'm using now. They just renamed it when they re-released it for the newer chipsets. How about the voltages though? My +12V rail is my top concern at the moment. Thanks!




Agentlaidlaw

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#4 13 years ago

I'm not sure on the voltage thing sorry.

But heres another fan thing. http://www.almico.com/speedfan.php

Quick question how does the P4 3.4ghz run? Does it run well? Like what you did I'm planning on selling my comp soon to build a new one before it goes to down in price..




C38368

...burning angel wings to dust

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14th February 2004

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#5 13 years ago

12.438V is unacceptably high: 12.12V is the absolute upper limit for a PSU to be in spec. Get a multimeter and measure the +12 rail manually, replace the PSU if that reads high. No quality unit would ever be that far above spec.

Before you ask: Always ground to a black wire (the negative lead on your multimeter goes here). To test the +12V rail, touch the positive lead on your multimeter to a yellow wire. To test the +5V rail, touch the positive lead on your multimeter to a red wire. To test the +3.3V rail, touch the positive lead on your multimeter to an orange wire. This orange wire can be found in either the 6-pin AUX connector on older PSUs, or in the 20- or 24-pin ATX connector.

I suggest that you unplug your PSU from everything while testing. This way you'll get an accurate reading under no load (this is important; quality PSUs exhibit little--if any--droop under load. Cheap units are all over the place). You can jump your PSU either by using a tester (Antec, among others, sells them), or you can bridge the green wire on the ATX connecter to any black wire on the same bundle. An unwound paperclip works fine for this, just be sure to wrap the end you hold onto with electrical tape.

DISCLAIMER: I am not responsible for any damage you cause your equipment or yourself by testing your PSU. If you break something, it's your fault. If you kill yourself, it's also your fault also. Ce pas?




carl4286

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#6 13 years ago

Thanks C38368. I'll go dig around in my dads shop for a multimeter. In the mean time, I'm getting off the computer and RMA'ing my power supply.