Windows vs. Linux 13 replies

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Aeroflot

I would die without GF

169,400 XP

2nd May 2003

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#1 13 years ago

I remember a couple of months ago my friend gave me a copy of Ubuntu, a linux OS. I really didn't know anything about linux at the time and I had been using windows 98 on my old comp and XP on my laptop. I installed unbuntu onto my laptop and I thought it was great, because the desktop was nice and organized and the whole interface was easy to use. However I soon found out that I couldn't use .exe files on linux, so I reinstalled XP on my laptop. Then a week ago I went over to one of my friends house. He's a linux fanatic and he has copies of two dozen versions on disks. He tells me to install linux on my laptop and get rid of windows once and for all. :uhm: Well, We try installing several linux versions, including: Xandros, Suse, Gentoo, Red Hat and a couple others. But, only Ubuntu would install properly out of all the linux versions I tried. So I reinstalled ubuntu, and then I got mad at it again, even though I had some program that let me use .exe files. I think it was called Cedera or something. I reinstalled XP again, and here I am now.

Now to get to the point of this whole thread, forget the story above lol. What do you think is better, Linux or Windows? Or which one do you like more? I like windows because I can run many applications without having to download five million things, and I like the design of the OS. However, Linux has a nice interface and is virtually virus-proof. I could name other things, but I'm lazy. I like windows more, but as I learn more about linux, I may change my mind. now.




Big {Daddy}

Get in!

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2nd October 2003

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#2 13 years ago

If you're a computer hobbiest or want to work in IT it's definitely worth learning. Linux PCs really are only the tip of the ice berg. So many devices utilise some form of Linux or Unix these days, you really can't get away from it. Try telneting your router (if you have one) - chances are, it runs a basic Linux OS.




Agentlaidlaw

Pie

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21st February 2005

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#3 13 years ago

Oh god. Linux if you want to do programing or just mess around and try to make your own OS. Windows for gaming and is a noob and like things to be done easy and quick. Me i recmomed linux cause i love it! Its my os, not microsoft, not mac, my own OS that i can call my own and i own the rights to it. i can do what ever i wan to it and use it for ever i want to use it for. I also made it to run some windows games that can't run on linux =). Thats why i love it sooo much.




tyriel

Waiting For Half-Life 3...

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28th November 2002

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#4 13 years ago

Windows > Linux Only because windows plays games easier and not to muh other then gaming matters. And yes, I briefly tried xandros. I didn't like all the things I had todo to get games working on linux, and that ATI doesn't have linux drivers, I think.




Pethegreat VIP Member

Lord of the Peach

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19th April 2004

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#5 13 years ago

I would like to get linux, get to mess around with some stuff and make my computer the ultmlate open source machine:p I would dich windows for good if games would run on linux




Kilobyte

What does the Fox say?

69,060 XP

23rd November 2002

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#6 13 years ago

I Enjoy tinkering with Linux. There is just so much more that can be tweaked, and altered, and changed, and whatever else I want. All to my hearts content. I find that learning how the OS works, is so much more satisfying than finishing any Video Game. Video Games have been very dissapointing as of late, for me at least. So Linux has been loads of fun.

There are three Linux programs, designed to run Windows Apps. Wine, CrossOver Office, and Cadega. The Last two being based on the first.

CrossOver allows for easy installation, and management of install programs, and focuses on Microsoft Office. Cadega focuses on DirectX extensions, to allow for greater game compatibility.

Ubuntu uses the Gnome Desktop, and I find it to be nice, clean, and functional. A serious competitor to Windows. However the most popular Desktop, or "Window Manager", is not Gnome, but rather KDE.

KDE is the most feature rich, and customizable, if not the most stable, and user friendly. It includes Shadows, and Menu Transparencies. Cooler Title bar themes, and Styles. The "Taskbar", or Panel as it is called, is laid out in a Windows style manner. With a "Start" button, that I call the "K" button, since it only has a K on it. Everything can be removed off the Panel, and it can be shrunk down, to take up almost no space, or hidden completely. Even more, it is just a program that is running, called the "Kicker", and can be closed completely.

There are other Window Managers, such as XFCE, and Enlightenment, that do not have icons on the desktop, or a "taskbar". They do things in a new, and different manner. Your "Start" menu, is available by right-clicking the desktop.

Linux is just a lot of fun to play around with, or play games with. I've got a ton of games loaded, Windows games, and Linux games. The default KDE Solitaire game (kpatience) is better than Solitaire.exe, you can add Wallpaper to the background, and there are more Card types to use, and more can be added.

Admittedly, it takes some getting used to. Since Linux/Unix/BSD use a strange Every thing is a file layout. Your drives are actually files in the root (similiar to C:\).

Ubuntu is one of the better distros. As far as ease of program management. It uses the APT system, and as long as you have an internet connection, it should be easy to install programs.

SimplyMepis is supposed to be easier to use, and Suse is the best on the market right now, as far as support.

I've been tinkering with Xandros, myself. I like the "feel" of it. There does seem to be a few issues holding it back, but I like it as an overall distro. I highly recommend giving it a try.

Then there are memeber(s) here who like Fedora Core. Namely FC3. It is the Test bed for RedHat, so anything new, and important will be tried on Fedora first. Unfortunately this makes the distro slightly unstable. Well, Linux is a very stable OS, so it will definately be nowhere near the instability of Windows 9x.

------Drivers----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Linux does have ATI drivers, just not good ones. That is changing, though. From what I've heard, ATI is getting to work behind the scenes to create more robust Linux drivers. When that happens ATI will be the prefered graphics card of Linux.

Since they make their drivers in an easy to install, and upgrade, RPM format. nVidia drivers are only avialable in the much loathed Binary, and must be installed in a DOS like, text mode. Yet the performance of nVidia drivers in Linux, often surpasses the performance in Windows.




Aeroflot

I would die without GF

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2nd May 2003

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#7 13 years ago

In what ways can Linux be 'tweaked'? And what programming languages do I need to know to create a linux os? I was learning Perl the other day, and I also looked at python. But I'm sure there's more involved than just those two languages.




Kilobyte

What does the Fox say?

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23rd November 2002

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#8 13 years ago

As for programming. It all depends on what Window Manager you prefer. Python, and GTK are the prefered methods for Linux programmers. This is evidenced by Mozilla/Firefox which integrate better with Gnome, than KDE. As far as themes go... Actually, Firefox integrates into KDE just as well as, if not more so, than it integrates into Windows.

KDE users prefer Qt, which is a C+ clone. The best two programming languages in Linux, is GTK, and QT.

--------Tweakable------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

That is the beauty of Linux. Almost everything can be tweaked, since it is Open Source.

You can go in, and remove things you don't like. Such as System Tray icons, and background processes taking up memory.

You can compile the kernel with most of the drivers, to increase compatibilty, and ease of upgradability. No need to reinstall, when you put the drive in a new computer... Alternatively, you can remove the standard drivers, and only stick with the default set, to increase performance.

You can change the type of Desktop/Window Manager you use (Start Menu, icons, window, etc.). Either a lightweight Desktop, that focuses on performance, or stability, or one that focuses on Features.

You can choose whether or not to install your Home folder (C:\Documents & Settings) to the same drive, or another drive, or partition. If you know how, then you can set every folder in Linux to a seperate drive.

You can mount ISO images, as folders, or CD-ROMs, using the built-in utilities. Since Linux loads the CD-ROM drive as a file, it needs those utilities to even make it work...

You can choose from a dozen different File Systems. Ones that allow for tags, and journals, and other features, or High Performance, or compatibility.

The "Taskbar" or Panel, or Kicker, or whatever you want to call it, can be completely customized. It can be transparent, and only take up a portion of the screen, so it is like the MacOS dock. The Launch, or "Start" button, or "K" button as I like to call it, can be removed completely, and a button added for any sub menu of the Launch Menu.

You can remove, or change the clock, between "fuzzy" (six o' clock), to Windows Style (6:06 pm), to Digital. You can add the date, or week or month to the clock. You can add Buttons, that allow you to browse folders, as if they were a menu. Those buttons will have a Open Folder option in the menu.

The icons on the Panel, are automatically set to the size of the panel. If it is 50 pixels high, then the icons default to 48x48.

You can change the Login style, to a wide variety of looks. There are Windows XP themes, and MacOS X themes, and Sports car themes, and Anime.

The Taskbar can be replaced, with one that shows small thumnails of each window, when your mouse moves over each button, or the buttons can be made transparent. You can also replace it with a Window List button, similair to the MacOS.

Other tricks carried over from Windows, is Color selection, multiple cursor themes. Single, or double-click icons.

Speaking of cursor themes, you can have the busy cursor show the icon for the program, instead of the hourglass. It can also be set to flash, or bounce. The bouce effect is cool.

Take a look at the following web sites for more info, on what all is customizable. www.kde-look.org www.gnome-look.org

Then you can set it not too boot to a desktop at all, and let it run faster in text mode. You can setup Apache, and other programs to run as services, or leave them to be started manually.

You can chagne which browser is the prefered integrated favorite. While KDE comes with Konqueror, and Gnome comes with Nautilus, and Epiphany, they are not required. You can use Konqueror in Gnome, or Firefox, or Opera. You can even use Internet Explorer via Wine (Why???).

You can use the features to have another login, or the same user logged in twice, with one login being in a Window. You can run multiple desktops on different screens, or ttys.

That is only scratching the surface, about what I know about Linux. Every part of Linux is modular, and can be removed. There are several alternatives, if you don't like one, pick another.

GTK vs Qt, vs Python. Firefox vs Opera vs Konqueror KDE vs Gnome vs Enlightenment Xfree vs Xorg (X Window system, a core part of the OS) Commercial Support vs Open Source Freedom (usually they go hand in hand, but not always, as is the case with nVidia drivers.)

This list goes on, and on... -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------




LuNaTiCk

Omniscient Deity

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4th June 2005

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#9 13 years ago

Linux is basically spyware and virus free, A major plus.




Revenge VIP Member

Shizzle my nizzle

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28th July 2004

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#10 13 years ago

I only started on Linux about six months ago and I haven't booted it up alot. The novelty of the small extra gubbins has worn off, and I find XP is alot quicker and better with large processing. I just use XP because everything is made with it as its benchmark - software, games, internet sites etc. - they're all meant for Windows Operating Systems.




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