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#1 8 years ago

Hi, was wondering if anyone could help me out here, I'm pretty computer savvy with computers but not when it comes down to computer parts, I want to surprise my son with a new gaming PC for his birthday in a few weeks and i have a friend who will build it for me if i get the parts, this is what i have so far as the for the main pieces of the computer, id like to know if this would be a good PC?

Intel i7 950 ASUS P6T Deluxe V2 LGA 1366 Intel ATX 2 x CORSAIR DOMINATOR 4GB (2 x 2GB) 240 pin DDR3SDRAM 1600 (PC312800) for 8GB total RAM Nvidia GTX 295

I'mnot looking to save money but not looking to go overboard either, as this is for my sons birthday present but want it to last a few years.

Any suggestion wold be appreciated.

Ty, Teresa




Mr. Pedantic

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#2 8 years ago

How old is your son?

First off. It is a very unwise decision to get the Core i7 950. It is a waste of ~US$250 (I don't know where you live, by convention most prices in FF will be in US$). Get the Core i7 920 instead. It's about half the price, but virtually no performance difference (if you, your friend, or your son can overclock it). You might also want to consider the Core i7 860. Basically, the decision comes down to this: would you possibly be planning to get another GTX295 in the future? If the answer is definitely yes, then the best choice would probably be the Core i7 920. If the answer is no, or probably, then the Core i7 860 would be a better choice.

Bear in mind that if you get a Core i7 860 instead of a Core i7 950 or 920, then you will also need a different motherboard. For the i7 920/950, the ASUS you have there is very decent.

Secondly. If you are going with a Core i7 920, then you will really, really want 3 sticks of RAM. There are lots of 6GB RAM kits out there specifically made for these processors. The idea is that the Bloomfield chips (Core i7 920 among them) use what's called triple channel memory - basically, it means that the most data goes through the connection when you have a number of RAM sticks that's equal to a multiple of 3. If you don't, you reduce the throughput accordingly. And as for the speed of the stuff, there really is no reason for you to get more than DDR3-1333. Up to about that speed, the modules are reliable, and perfectly fine for any sort of use you would have for it, but above that speed, there's no point in it. The rest of your system will become a liability long before the RAM. Not to mention that good quality, high-speed chips are a bit of a lottery. Many reviewers report having their RAM completely die on them after a week or so. Not good for a gift, I'd imagine.

The GTX295. What brand? What model? What happens with graphics cards nowadays is that NVidia and ATI make the specifications, and then give them to specified partners to produce en masse and build upon. Give us an idea of what you expect out of this card, and we could make a recommendation. Also, are you sure you need this card? If you can bear to wait a fortnight at most, ATI is coming out with its new generation of graphics cards, the HD58xx series. These will, if rumours from ATI are to be believed, will completely demolish this current generation of cards. I urge you to wait at least until then. Even if you won't be getting one of these new cards, prices for the current generation of cards will assuredly drop upon their release.

You probably need some other parts as well. If this is a brand new computer, then you'll need a power supply unit (PSU) to modulate the electricity coming through the wall into something that is usable by the components. You will need a case. You may/may not need a keyboard, monitor, mouse, speakers/headphones, etc. You may want to buy a few games, maybe? You will definitely need some hard drives. And please please please, get a heatsink for the CPU.

You say you don't have a budget. How much do you reasonably think that you should spend on this new computer? If you give us at least an estimate, then we can help you get the most balanced system for that price. You might want to put all the money into graphics cards, but it might (most likely will) be possible to get a cheaper solution with more performance, and get you much more balanced system overall.




kow_ciller

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#3 8 years ago

You'll definately want to wait a week or so to see what the new ATI cards look like. They're supposed to beat a gtx295 in a single card which can mean game-over if you have two of them. Also, I would suggest getting a 920 instead of the 950 i7 since the 950 isn't any faster and is a waste of money. You'll also want to get a 3x2gb set of memory instead of 2x4 since i7 takes advantage of tri-channel memory instead of dual-channel.




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#4 8 years ago

Thank you! Mr. Pedantic and kow_ciller,

Wow that a lot of info to go over but i will do so and rethink on what to get, my budget is $1200.00 USD give or take my son i 13yo in a few weeks. i really like the suggestion of the i920 very much and i dint know about the RAM which i appreciate, the nvidia i was told was a better card but i will definitely look in the the new ATI card as i will be only purchasing one card also i don't think this computer will be overclocked its for my son and hes just into playing games i don't think he'd be doing any modification on it at least i hope not :)

Would you guys recommend a 3 stick RAM kit suitable for the i920 and Asus main board? and also i did read on how important it is to have correct watts in PSU as I am not sure on how much it would need? and I'm not sure on a heat sink there are quite a few out there. The hard drive and other small bits I'm sure i can figure out it was just these main parts that i was worried about choosing correctly to be able to give him a nice fast system hes been wanting, like i said I'm not to up on the internal working of a PC :uhoh: and i do appreciate your help tremendously.

Ty Teresa




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#5 8 years ago

How much do you plan on spending for Monitor, Case, PSU, Optical Drives, Hard Drives, peripherals, etc????

If you have a $1200 budget you need to factor that in


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#6 8 years ago

S.T.A.L.K.E.R

Most of the peripherals and monitor i have already, my budget is mostly for the main pieces of the computer, its 1200.00 give or take, not really set though

Thanks, Teresa




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#7 8 years ago

Go with a 920, they can be had for $200 at Microcenter right now and word is Fry's will match that price too. The LGA 1366 socket it fits is by far a better uprade path for 3 or even more years, as Intel plans to make the 32nm i9 Hex core CPUs fit it. You can also get X58 motherboards that fit the 920 for under $200 with dual SLI capability.

The only reason the i5 and 800 series i7s have been raved about lately is reviewers are overclocking them pretty high (about 3.85GHz) and showing how they can beat a stock i7 965, but a stock 965 runs at only 3.2GHz. A 920 will beat a stock 965 with a much lower speed than 3.85GHz and is easier to overclock.

I'm not sure I'd go with a GTX295 either. With DX11 video cards coming soon it would make more sense to get something affordable like a GTX275, then swap it out with a DX11 card sometime in 2010. Or if he decides to stick with the GTX275, two of them will outperform a GTX295, cost less, and run cooler.




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#8 8 years ago

As a longtime nVidia supporter, I don't recommend the GTX 295. Get a single 285, which will dominate pretty much anything you throw at it, and can be linked with another (or two others!) in SLI if you so choose later.




Mr. Pedantic

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#9 8 years ago

Go with a 920, they can be had for $200 at Microcenter right now and word is Fry's will match that price too. The LGA 1366 socket it fits is by far a better uprade path for 3 or even more years, as Intel plans to make the 32nm i9 Hex core CPUs fit it. You can also get X58 motherboards that fit the 920 for under $200 with dual SLI capability.

The only reason the i5 and 800 series i7s have been raved about lately is reviewers are overclocking them pretty high (about 3.85GHz) and showing how they can beat a stock i7 965, but a stock 965 runs at only 3.2GHz. A 920 will beat a stock 965 with a much lower speed than 3.85GHz and is easier to overclock.

I'm not sure I'd go with a GTX295 either. With DX11 video cards coming soon it would make more sense to get something affordable like a GTX275, then swap it out with a DX11 card sometime in 2010. Or if he decides to stick with the GTX275, two of them will outperform a GTX295, cost less, and run cooler.

To be honest, since she's not overclocking, a Core i7 860 would be, I think, a better choice, because the more aggressive Turbo Boost would be much more useful. Plus it consumes less power, the chipset and RAM is cheaper to buy, and for a single GPU solution, confers little disadvantage apart from slower QPI.

As a longtime nVidia supporter, I don't recommend the GTX 295. Get a single 285, which will dominate pretty much anything you throw at it, and can be linked with another (or two others!) in SLI if you so choose later.

To be honest, it's getting harder and harder to recommend either 4870X2 or GTX295, except for people who will definitely add another one in, either immediately or later. You could buy separate cards which are cheaper and give more performance when CF'd or SLI'd together. Even the 285 is a bit iffy; 50% more costly than the 275, but with what, 10-15% benefit?




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#10 8 years ago
Mr. Pedantic;5002631To be honest, since she's not overclocking, a Core i7 860 would be, I think, a better choice, because the more aggressive Turbo Boost would be much more useful. Plus it consumes less power, the chipset and RAM is cheaper to buy, and for a single GPU solution, confers little disadvantage apart from slower QPI.

It didn't sound like she was sure about the OCing bit. If a card as powerful as the 295 is even a consideratioon and/or SLI, it would behoove them to have the person building it if he has even slightly more than average skill, OC it to avoid bottle neck at the very least. I also think you're overstating the capabilities of the 1156 chips. They had to be clocked quite high to beat the 965 consistently even at stock speed.