Z-5500 Dts 3 replies

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Shintsu

For the glory of Helghan

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9th April 2005

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#1 13 years ago

Ok, I just purchased an M-Audio Revolution 5.1 and have it all hooked up and running through Digital Coax, and I wondered if its still possible to use DTS, or if you must have Optical in order to use it. Thanks!




C38368

...burning angel wings to dust

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14th February 2004

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#2 13 years ago

Nope, coax uses the same S/PDIF encoding scheme that TOSLINK does. Just plug it in, select coax as you input, and queue up something that's encoded in DTS. Make sure the player is set to output to S/PDIF and you're good to go. The control pod will read "Digital" with the Dolby logo when it's recieving a DTS signal.




Pethegreat VIP Member

Lord of the Peach

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19th April 2004

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#3 13 years ago

I still need to figure out how to use DTS on my sony d595 reciver(says its DTS certified as well as PL2). I got a digital audio cables from my PS2 to the reciver. I know I get dolby digital by setting my reciver to dolby Pro-logic. I don't think I can select an digital input even though I have one: /

*goes off to find his manual*




C38368

...burning angel wings to dust

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#4 13 years ago

If you Sony works anything at all like the receiver on the Z-5500s, then all you need to do is plug a digital (75 ohm coaxial or TOSLINK optical) from your source to the receiver, set your player to use S/PDIF (or possibly simply "digital") output, and your receiver will pick up on it and decode appropriately.

If you're using Dolby PL or PL2, then you're sending a digital signal, yes, but just a plain stereo signal, rather than one that's been encoded in DTS.

I also occurs to me to mention that you need to have a source that either acts as an AC3/DTS passthrough (which just takes the DTS audio stream off of your DVD or whatever and ships it off, still encoded, to the receiver), or actually encodes whatever you're trying to play into DTS. Very few (if any?) consumer cards are capable of the latter.