2012 Serbian Elections 2 replies

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Commissar MercZ

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#1 6 years ago

Serbia too has their own elections, and like much of the other Eurozone the question of the EU has come front and center. The elections are for presidential, parliament, and local, and at all spots it appears to be framed in the context of the EU. The two 'major' candidates are incumbent president Boris Tadic is through and through pro-EU, and his chief opponent Tomislav Nikolic, who is more nationalist. Though not explicitly anti-EU, he's certainly critical of it.

I'll try to get some of the parliamentary results when I can get them. The presidential election is expected to be close, meaning we'll see a run-off between Tadic and Nikolic.

BBC News - Serbs vote in closely fought national and local elections

6 May 2012 Last updated at 10:25 ET Serbs vote in closely fought national and local elections

Voters in Serbia are voting in presidential, parliamentary and local elections.

Opinion polls suggest opposition candidate Tomislav Nikolic and liberal incumbent Boris Tadic are running neck and neck in the presidential race.

Mr Tadic stepped down as president last month, forcing an early presidential vote alongside the other polls.

Both men say they are committed to European Union membership for Serbia, which won EU candidate status in March.

However, Mr Nikolic, an old ally of the late Slobodan Milosevic, fiercely opposed the move just a few years ago.

The election is being fought primarily between two parties at the centre of the political spectrum, the BBC's Nick Thorpe reports from Belgrade.

As president, Mr Tadic oversaw Serbia's EU candidacy negotiations and has argued that success for him and his Democratic Party (DS) is vital for development and stability in Serbia over the next decade. Economy

Mr Nikolic, who once said he would rather see Serbia ally itself with Russia than join the EU, has recently softened his nationalist rhetoric and chosen to attack the DS on its economic record.

Serbia is plagued by unemployment of 24% and foreign debt of 24bn euros (£19.5bn; $31.5bn).

"The economy is the most important issue at hand for all the voters, there's no question about that," Srdjan Bogosavljevic, from the Ipsos Strategic Marketing polling agency, told the Associated Press news agency.

"The economic situation is much worse than people have expected it to be."

Aleksandar Ristic, a 30-year-old with a small business in Belgrade, said people were "struggling to survive".

"People are fed up with them all," he added.

Opinion polls suggest Mr Nikolic's Serbian Progressive Party (SNS) may become the biggest in parliament, just ahead of the DS, but some kind of coalition with smaller parties is the likely outcome.

Mr Nikolic has said on the campaign trail that the SNS wants the EU and the jobs and investment it may offer.

But he added that Serbia could not give up its breakaway province of Kosovo in exchange.

If there is no outright winner in the presidential race, as seems likely, a run-off vote will be held in two weeks' time.




Commissar MercZ

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#2 6 years ago

As expected, the presidential election will head to a runoff. Nikolic received 25.5% and Tadic with 25.4%. The rest was divided up by 10 other candidates. In the parliament, Nikolic's party, the Serb Progressive Party (which really isn't "progressive" in the sense we usually see it), received 24.1% of the votes (73 seats) and Tadic's Democratic Party received 22.4% (68 seats).

Other parties- the Socialist Party (Milosevic's old party) with 14.4% (44 seats), the Democratic Party of Serbia with 6.9% (21 seats), and the Liberal-Democrats with 6.6% (20 seats). The United Regions of Serbia party grabbed 16 seats, and Alliance of Vojvodina Hungarians will have five seats. Five small minor parties- the Party of Democratic Action, None of the Above, and All Together- will each have a seat between themselves.

The Serb Radical Party, a partner of Milosevic's Socialist Party back in the 1990s, ended up losing all its seats in parliament. This is because Nikolic had more than likely taken much of its support away when he broke from the party to form his Serb Progressive Party. Vojislav Šešelj, a former leader of the party, is currently at the Hague standing for war crimes.




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#3 6 years ago

The second round of elections has seen Tomislav Nikolic of the SPP secure victory against the incumbent Boris Tadic of the Democratic Party. With 70% of stations reporting, Nikolic has 49.4% against Tadic's 47.4%. Turnout was low however, with only 36% of voters casting ballots.