A Second Home - A Second Species 7 replies

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Flash525

The Carbon Comrade

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14th July 2004

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#1 8 years ago

Seems there are quite a few subjects up as of late in regards to extra-terrestrial life, other planets, our planet, the universe, and so on. Got me thinking about many aspects of life if we were to actually leave this planet, and go elsewhere.

We've evolved to the specific point where we are because of our planet, and our surroundings. I'm no biologist, but say one day Humanity did enevitably colonize other worlds, would the people that live on those other planets continue to be human, or would evolution take another turn, in effect changing people from the typical human being into something else, somewhat different?

Most people (myself included) would believe that should humanity get to such a stage, we'll be having space battles (much as we currently do, just instead of on one planet, it'll be across entire solar systems and the like). Typically we'd see this as humanity vs humanity, but then, if we're only the way we are because of our earth-based environment, and a bunch of us end up on other planets, would we be the same, would be continue to be human in the common sense?

I think, to a point, the same would apply to space-travel. If we're this specific way because of earth, and we leave and (some of us) live in space, would we become something different to the people left back home?

Discuss...




Mr. Pedantic

I would die without GF

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8th October 2006

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#2 8 years ago
We've evolved to the specific point where we are because of our planet, and our surroundings. I'm no biologist, but say one day Humanity did enevitably colonize other worlds, would the people that live on those other planets continue to be human, or would evolution take another turn, in effect changing people from the typical human being into something else, somewhat different?

That would take quite a long time. And I'm fairly certain that our desire to have standards and uniformity would overwhelm any selective pressures put on our environment. In part, this is the case even now.

I think, to a point, the same would apply to space-travel. If we're this specific way because of earth, and we leave and (some of us) live in space, would we become something different to the people left back home?

Look at how America turned out.




Serio VIP Member

The Dane

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11th November 2006

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#3 8 years ago

Those that leave Earth could potentially be considered outcasts and outsiders - people that have chosen to leave their ancestral home to pursue new opportunities. Would it have an effect on their physical status? Depends on the planet. I imagine a planet with a very strong gravity would severely alter, at the very least, the arrangement of our internal organs. Less daylight hours could alter our sight as well as other senses. Physical changes would likely occur, but the time it'd take would depend on the severity of the "morphing".

Mentally, space explorers would no doubt be more focused on making something of themselves, establish a name if you so please. They could even, eventually, try to conquer or convert their ancestral home planet if their ideologies and beliefs change too much. In short, there's no easy way to predict what would happen to humans, but if you believe that modern day humans evolved in Africa you could use that as an example. Cultures evolved, religions evolved, ideas were bred in the human mind, most of it because of their locale.




Authuran

Queef Richards

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2nd October 2005

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#4 8 years ago

Think about it this way. The most likely planet we'll colonize after Earth is Mars (it's basically in it's planning stages now). So what are the effects it will have on people?

Firstly, you can think of the physical effects. Mars is only 1/3 of Earth's gravity, therefore people will either have to muscle build daily or fall victim to loss of muscle and bone mass. I choose the latter, I can't imagine a lazy ass civilization like ours exercising every day. Lack of bone mass and muscle impacts our evolution a lot. Assuming that there are people simultaneously on Earth and Mars, the Martian colony will eventually evolve to look much different then the people on Earth. Human evolution will diverge.

Then there's the mental effects. We can safely assume that the original Martian colonists will suffer from loneliness and isolation as we have a built-in love and dependence for Earth (it's the planet that gave us life and everything we enjoy and love) and we can only hope that won't effect the development of the human race on Mars.




Keyser_Soze

Loves Lamp

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3rd May 2009

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#5 8 years ago

interesting question. humans developed and evolved due to natural selection- i.e. survival of the fittest. natural selection has effectively ended now, as we have developed to an extent where we no longer need to adapt.

in colonisation, there may well be a return to natural selection. we'd have to start from square 1, and as other worlds would likely be far away, humans on this world would have to fend for themselves, being separated from the rest of civilisation. i find it likely that evolution would likely occur again, if humans lasted long enough on this colony.




Joe Bonham

Quetron's alt account

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10th December 2005

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#6 8 years ago

For the time being at least there's really no economic incentive to colonize other planets.

-Overpopulation. Not an issue anymore, mainly due to increased education/use of contraceptives, not to mention various famines and wars have had quite a way of reducing crowding on Earth.

-A better life. The only people who could possibly have a better life on another planet are the masses of people in the third world - but they lack the education to really be of any use on a new colony except as a massed force for cheap labor. But with our current technology transporting that many people would be far too expensive, not to mention sheltering and feeding them once they actually reached their destination.

-Religious/Political persecution. Hell, that's how America started out. But do you really need to go to another planet to escape persecution? Global travel is cheap and easy. Just move to France or something. Of course that could change with the introduction of a world government (that presumably could hunt you down no matter where you try to hide.) - but that also introduces the problem that this so-called world government would probably also control the colonies, and more importantly, the transportation agencies getting people out there. A political prisoner trying to escape would most likely be caught before he could even leave earth. Now you could make a good argument that the world government might allow persecuted people to leave earth and go to the colonies (much like the pilgrims were granted permission to sail to the new world) - but I believe a modern world government would not do this. They would be more interested in controlling the colonial population and making sure only loyal citizens go out there. The risk of rebellion would be far too great to risk sending political or religious malcontents in large numbers.

Naturally that could change in the future, but for now, I doubt we'll be seeing any colonies or mass interstellar exoduses any time soon.




jackripped

People say I post too much

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2nd December 2009

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#7 8 years ago

If 'humans' are born on a world colinized by other 'humans' l would say there still human, its what the human genome is, and they would all still have the genetic markers out of africa......




IcePure

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#8 8 years ago

I was under the impression that by the time we're firmly established on other planets, we'd be Transhuman, if only slightly - so we control our own 'evolution' from that point. We could have part mechanical legs and arms etc that dissipate the need for exercise.