American ISPs to Start Spying for Copyrighted Content. 12 replies

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Nittany Tiger Forum Mod

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#1 6 years ago

Well, it appears that the entertainment industry is going to go through private channels to police the internet. ISPs have brokered a deal with the RIAA and MPAA and have agreed to start monitoring traffic for copyright content and to issue punishments for those caught torrenting.

If you download potentially copyrighted software, videos or music, your Internet service provider (ISP) has been watching, and they’re coming for you.

Specifically, they’re coming for you on Thursday, July 12.

That’s the date when the nation’s largest ISPs will all voluntarily implement a new anti-piracy plan that will engage network operators in the largest digital spying scheme in history, and see some users’ bandwidth completely cut off until they sign an agreement saying they will not download copyrighted materials.

Word of the start date has been largely kept secret since ISPs announced their plans last June. The deal was brokered by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) and the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA), and coordinated by the Obama Administration. The same groups have weighed in heavily on controversial Internet policies around the world, with similar facilitation by the Obama’s Administration’s State Department.

The July 12 date was revealed by the RIAA’s CEO and top lobbyist, Cary Sherman, during a publishers’ conference on Wednesday in New York, according to technology publication CNet.

The content industries calls this scheme a “graduated response” plan, which will see Time Warner Cable, Cablevision, Comcast, Verizon, AT&T and others spying on users’ Internet activities and watching for potential copyright infringement. Users who are “caught” infringing on a creator’s protected work can then be interrupted with a notice that piracy is forbidden by law and carries penalties of up to $150,000 per infringement, requiring the user to click through saying they understand the consequences before bandwidth is restored, and they could still be subject to copyright infringement lawsuits.

Participating ISPs have a range of options for dealing with customers who continue to pirate media, at that point: They can require that an alleged repeat offender undergo an educational course before their service is restored. They can utilize multiple warnings, restrict access to only certain major websites like Google, Facebook or a list of the top 200 sites going, reduce someone’s bandwidth to practically nothing and even share information on repeat offenders with competing ISPs, effectively creating a sort of Internet blacklist — although publicly, none of the network operators have agreed to “terminate” a customer’s service.

It is because of those reasons that the content industries believe this program achieves much more than what might have been possible in the realm of public policy, and the ISPs appear to agree. The voluntary scheme will be paid for mostly by the content industries, which will share some costs with the ISPs.

Not everyone sees it as a positive: The Electronic Frontier Foundation, a digital rights advocacy group, argued that the “graduated response” scheme lacks transparency, and that copyright holders could wield the network operators like a blunt instrument in cases where their claims may not be entirely valid — which is the biggest problem with statutes codified by the Digital Millennium Copyright Act. They also pressed for assurances that claim reviews will be conducted by a neutral party, and suggested that users should be given some form of due process before their bandwidth is turned down or cut off entirely.

The EFF also took issue with the system of protest the program puts in place, which only gives users six predetermined “defenses” against a copyright claim. “And even the six enumerated defenses are incomplete,” they complained. “For example, the ‘public domain’ defense applies only if the work was created before 1923 — even though works created after 1923 can enter the public domain in a variety of ways.”

A legislative effort that would have achieved some, but not all, of these ends was utterly destroyed by the Internet’s first ever mass work stoppage late last year, which saw thousands of popular websites go dark in protest. (Disclosure: The Raw Story participated in that protest.)

It’s not yet clear how the tech world will react to the ISPs siding with the content industries to do what the government simply could not.

I don't want to live in this country anymore, and I'm dead serious.

I know piracy needs to be monitored, but I don't trust the entertainment industry with power farther than I can throw a mountain. It also seems that the RIAA and MPAA doesn't need govt. legislation to police the internet.

http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2012/03/15/american-isps-to-launch-massive-copyright-spying-scheme-on-july-12/




Nemmerle Forum Mod

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#2 6 years ago

I guess we'll be going back to the days of videotaped anime being sent to people....

Seriously though - this has been the case on some file sharing sites for years. At least in that they'll take down your content if they know what it is. People just took to sticking it in locked ZIPs. Not the most secure method admittedly, but there are vastly more secure methods out there, that I think people will use if ISPs really start to push this sort of thing.

It's not like you have to send your files unencrypted over a public network. ISPs want to break up the party - mayhaps they'll find they're not invited....

Reminds me of a few years back, when gov was trying to make encryption illegal.

-sigh-

I don't see this ending well for anyone. On the company side, they'll use enforced TPM. Well, they've already started with Blu-ray and graphics cards....

On the public side it'll be file encryption, mass disobedience - perhaps refusal to purchase the crippled equipment at all.

Encryption is obviously the ultimate endgame. It's where both sides are going to have to go to keep their game up.

The companies will need to try and outlaw open source media players to keep people using their TPMs....

Edit: Heck you don't want to live in America over that? Seems to be a more general trend to me.

http://www.texasobserver.org/cover-story/the-right-not-to-know

Some things you've got to sit down and just think --- how fucking twisted some people are. And they seem to be getting more traction. Ya' know. Economy going down the drain, losing military power by reference to other nations, increasingly extremist politics, religion and erosion of civil liberties.... Might be time to get out.

Then again, I've been thinking much the same of the UK lately....




MrFancypants Forum Admin

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#3 6 years ago

I'd like to say that Germany is different, but politicians from all major parties here are big fans of anti-piracy legislation.

We do have the pirate party though. Not exactly a great political party, but at least they put some pressure on the other parties.




Nittany Tiger Forum Mod

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#4 6 years ago

But Germany seems to have strict copyright laws.




Totes

Misanthrope

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#5 6 years ago

Greeeeeaat. Welp, better start preparing for prison.




Nittany Tiger Forum Mod

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#6 6 years ago

Yeah. It's sad that a petty crime is equated to a felony. This wouldn't be as big of a deal if the punishment fit the crime. It also wouldn't be a big deal if the entertainment industry wasn't pushing for control of the internet so virulently.




Commissar MercZ

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29th January 2005

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#7 6 years ago
Killer Kyle;5622289But Germany seems to have strict copyright laws.

I think that would confirm his stance that Germany's major parties are all pretty strongly in favor of 'anti-piracy' measures. And he's right, it holds true to many countries. Beyond some 'rogue' members of a party trying to hold back against it, or some interest-parties like the Pirates, most political groups have either come out in favor of implementing these things (save jobs, help the economy, etc.) or avoid taking a position on it.

Hopefully with the success of groups like the Pirates it may move this issue into more mainstream discourse, but as things stand it'll be difficult. One of those cases where it's not just a 'government' interest but also a business one too.

Stateside, the major IP provides are Comcast, Verizon, and TimeWarner, and Cablevision are moving to implement this voluntary anti-piracy measures. Not sure about ATT, but I'm sure they'll probably jump on board too.




MrFancypants Forum Admin

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#8 6 years ago
Killer Kyle;5622289But Germany seems to have strict copyright laws.

I guess it depends how you define strict. It is similar to what most other countries have, although we have no 3-strikes rule as they do in France. Not yet, at least.

Politicians are pushing for laws like ACTA though. And they are being total dicks about it too - when a protest movement formed recently the signing of ACTA was delayed. Apparently politicians want to avoid any confrontation and sneak the law past the crowd when people are occupied with something else.




Crazy Wolf VIP Member

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#9 6 years ago

Well, I think everyone's going to get a lot more familiar with encryption software. It'll discourage the everyday user, but those with a middling interest or those who stand to make money off of piracy (international bootleggers?) will adapt fairly quickly.




Nemmerle Forum Mod

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#10 6 years ago

I don't know that it will discourage anyone, I think people will build it right into the torrenting programs and make it accessible that way.




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