Americanisms 53 replies

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aeroSPACE_engineer

Something less arrogant

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20th October 2005

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#1 13 years ago

Basically, American words which do not exist in English in the UK, American phrases which don't have any meaning here in the UK, American spellings of words, American alternative meanings for words, American pronounciation that is different to that of English in the UK. for example: words that we don't have like "diaper" (if that's even spelt right) spellings like "color" words that mean different things like "fanny" (which I'm going to argue should be acceptable for me to write in this context, should anyone have an issue with it, especially since it is technically a persons name, but also because I know very many Americans that have got into trouble by using that word in the UK) for pronounciation, "tomato" springs to mind, but there are others. different grammar such as "different than" instead of "different to" or "different from" Include any such similar thing. Americans also feel free to write from the opposite perspective. The idea is to discuss where these words came from, why they are different, whether or not it annoys us (not expressing the annoyance over-zealously) and to enlighten both of us so that we don't misread sentences so much.




Inyri Forge VIP Member

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15th March 2005

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#2 13 years ago

You guys are the ones that call cigarettes "fags." I must say you're smarter than us, though, putting your periods outside of the quotation marks. One of the few English-only things I am actually jealous of.

By the way, it's "daiper." Phonetics, dear. It's not "dee-ap-er."




Pethegreat VIP Member

Lord of the Peach

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19th April 2004

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#3 13 years ago

Then once your in the US you have a ton of sub dilects(sp?) with their own words and pronunications.

The one I speak is [SIZE=-1]Pittsburghese[/SIZE]. Insted of "clean up your room" we have "redd up your room". Insted of downtown it is pronunced

The great speaker of this language is sports caster Myron Cope. He is [SIZE=-1]Pittsburghese if it could be a human

If you want some more info, click me. They will even teach you how to speak it! [/SIZE]

This is my favorite

Allegheny Whitefish=Condom floating down the river

:giggle:




masked_marsoe VIP Member

Heaven's gonna burn your eyes

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16th April 2005

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#4 13 years ago

And every English speaking country has it's own words/dialects. We share some with the Aussies (dunny) and then have others that mean different things (thongs), as well as words borrowed from maori that have made their way into everyday use, like pakeha (white guy).




Pb2Au

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4th October 2004

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#5 13 years ago
'Inyri Forge'By the way, it's "daiper." Phonetics, dear. It's not "dee-ap-er."

Actually, Inyri, it IS diaper. Like sword, it makes absolutely no sense, but that's the way it is spelled. Hmmmm... Americanisms Wrench-spanner Pants-trousers Grey-gray Elevator-lift Trunk-boot (car) Spring to mind. I grew up in an international school where all the teachers were British, so I picked up quite a few of these.




Inyri Forge VIP Member

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#6 13 years ago

Haha darn, you're right aren't you? Just another reason the English language is so screwed up. I blame the Brits. It's their language. Had we made it first it would've been right.

Actually, we should probably blame the Germans, as English is Germanic language.




Admiral Donutz VIP Member

Wanna go Double Dutch?

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9th December 2003

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#7 13 years ago

Blame Germania ;). Did you know that old Dutch and Old English looked more alike then Old Dutch compared to Old German?

My uncle has a book about the history of English language and it has a sentance that could just as well have been (old) Dutch. It was something along the lines of "Eet tis broad foor et is ma lichama" ("at this bread for it is my body" in modern English and "Eet dit brood voor het is mijn lichaam" in modern Dutch).

PS: Note that the above "old" English line could be way off, it's all from memory. I should ask my uncle to show me that page again when I see him agian.




masked_marsoe VIP Member

Heaven's gonna burn your eyes

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16th April 2005

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#8 13 years ago

Hah, it's not like we native English speakers can understand Englisc. aelfric.gif

Aside from a few phonetics and some words we've carried though )child children, sheep), it's a different language.




Crazy Wolf VIP Member

Snipes With Artillery

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22nd March 2005

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#9 13 years ago

Indeed. Lets see, I'm assuming you know ain't by now.(present tense negative, that ain't right, It ain't like that) wanker isn't used as much over here. Rubber(UK)-eraser (US) Rubber(US)-condom(UK)... we have lots of different words for this one Pronunciation is different. Racoon is an Algonquin word, so its American. Moccasin and other Native words like haole(Hawaiian for 'cracka') are American.




aeroSPACE_engineer

Something less arrogant

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20th October 2005

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#10 13 years ago

ain't is actually a cockney expression for is/are not, it is much older than Americans, and exists for both of us. Diaper is phonetic spelling, Dye-a-per, but if you say it fast it sounds right, it is technically 3 syllables. However, using latin pronounciation for ai, Daiper would sound the same, but is only 2 syllables. Bonnet - hood (car also) color - Color (I don't understand why you dropped the 'u', it makes no sense) most words in America that you spell -ize at the end, we spell -ise. Aluminium pron. ah-luh-min-E-um NOT Aluminum pron. ah-loo-mi-num But especially the word I mentioned at the start, I understand f*nny, refers to your bottom in America. However in this country it refers to something different and specific to women, so I'll leave you to figure it out, if you don't already know.