Anonymous hacks into call between FBI and Scotland Yard 6 replies

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Commissar MercZ

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#1 6 years ago

Anonymous hacks into phone call between FBI and Scotland Yard | Technology | The Guardian

Hackers from the group Anonymous have broadcast a private conference call between the FBI and Scotland Yard exposing details of an international cybercrime investigation, the FBI has confirmed.

The FBI and Scotland Yard admitted that the security of the call had been breached.

Investigators can be heard discussing their joint inquiry into a cybercrime investigation going through the British courts, and linked to investigations in New York, Baltimore, Los Angeles and Ireland.

It is understood the breach occurred at the US end of the call. As the news broke, Anonymous began taunting the FBI, asking if it was curious about how the group could keep reading the bureau's internal communications.

Investigators can be heard on the broadcast talking about named individuals who have been charged in the UK with hacking into the website of the Serious Organised Crime Agency (Soca).

In one lengthy exchange, the British contingent can be heard discussing a 15-year-old hacker as a "wannabe" and a "pain in the bum". The 15-minute call has been broadcast on the internet, but the names of some of the individuals being sought have been bleeped out by the hackers.

Scotland Yard said: "We are aware of the video which relates to an FBI conference call involving a PCeU [member of the e-crime unit] representative. The matter is being investigated by the FBI.

"At this stage no operational risks to the MPS have been identified; however, we continue to carry out a full assessment. We are not prepared to discuss [it] further."

The conference call was one that appears to be held weekly between officers from the Metropolitan police's e-crime unit and the FBI in New York and Los Angeles.

The law enforcement agencies are working together on a cybercrime investigation involving teenagers and young people from the UK, Ireland, Germany and the US, it is understood.

Six people are going through the British courts charged in connection with hacking into computers belonging to Soca. They include Ryan Cleary, a British teenager who is charged with five offences of hacking websites. Cleary, 19, from Wickford, Essex, was arrested in June last year. His arrest was linked to a series of cyber-attacks by a group called LulzSec.

Cleary was charged over cyber-attacks against British-based targets. He is due to appear at Southwark crown court with his co-accused, Jake Davis, on 11 May. Four other individuals, are due to appear at the same court in March as part of the same investigation. Cleary has been charged with three attacks – on the London-based International Federation of the Phonographic Industry in November 2010, the British Phonographic Industry in October 2010, and on Soca.

The method he is alleged to have used is a distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack against all three websites. He was also charged with constructing a botnet, a network of infected computers that can be used remotely to direct attacks.

On the intercepted call, the British police officers joke with their FBI counterparts early in the conversation while they wait for others to join, and are heard making fun of Sheffield - where the Acpo cybercrime conference is being held next week. "It's a khazi - not exactly a jewel in England's crown," says the British detective. The call, which took place nearly a fortnight ago – it is understood – includes a conversation about the appearance of Cleary and Davis at Southwark crown court last Friday.

The FBI official expresses his gratitude to the British officers for "being flexible" and co-ordinating with them. "New York appreciates it," the FBI operative says.

In response, the British detective says: "We have cocked things up in the past."

The British detective then gives the FBI details of a 15-year-old who was arrested in the UK before Christmas. He calls the 15-year-old a "wannabe" and is connected with two other teenagers who are known as CSL sec "Cant Stop Laughing Security".

"He is just a pain in the bum," the officer says. The call ends with all parties agreeing to talk again the following Monday.

The events leading to the arrest of Cleary involved an investigation by British police and the FBI. The bureau's involvement, plus the nature of the targets, raised the prospect of Washington seeking the teenager's extradition to the US.

The conference call reveals that two other individuals are to be arrested in the future. It makes clear that the investigation is complex, stretching across international boundaries and focusing on teenage hackers in many different cases.

Karen Todner, a lawyer for Cleary, said the recording could be "incredibly sensitive" and warned such data breaches had the potential to derail the police's work. If they haven't secured their email it could potentially prejudice the investigation," she told Associated Press.Anonymous is a collection of internet enthusiasts, pranksters and activists whose targets have included the Church of Scientology, the music industry, and financial companies such as Visa and MasterCard.

Some of the inane conversations in the video are funny, but anyways, this is believed to have been connected to the arrests of hackers connected to lulzsec. Of note too is the FBI's interest in extraditing the suspect to the US for trial.

'Anonymous' has also done other things, including to but not limited to hacking neo-nazis and other racists in Germany and the United States, and the hacking of the website of the lawyers that defended the 'Haditha Marine' who was recently able to walk away without facing significant legal punishment. Earlier sites- including the Department of Justice, FBI, the Copyright Office, MPAA, RIAA- were temporarily brought down following the closure of megaupload.




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#2 6 years ago

What a bunch of assholes. Harassing lawyers who defended a United States Marine? Do they not understand the legal process? Why not go after any number of the real scumbag lawyers out there?

And interfering with a legtimate criminal investigation because they're mad over Megaupload? America, where it's okay for the TSA to fondle our balls at the airport but God forbid you mess with our torrents. :rolleyes:

However in a sense it's good that they expose these security flaws that any number of legitimate threats to national security could take advantage of. it's not an excuse for their actions, but it may have been one of the factors that has gotten the federal government to pay more attention to cybersecurity in recent months.




Pethegreat VIP Member

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#3 6 years ago
America, where it's okay for the TSA to fondle our balls at the airport but God forbid you mess with our torrents.

You can't exactly hack a TSA agent's mind as easily as you can hack a website.

I am glad to see that Anon can do something other than "Firin' mah lazor" with the LOIC at infrequently used websites. The nice thing about cyberspace is that a small group can wield just as much power as a large army.

I would love to see Anon release the full case files on the people who got arrested. The FBI and Scotland Yard may need a new pair of pants if that happens.




Schofield VIP Member

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#4 6 years ago

I sincerely hope the term "hack" is being used very lightly.




Nemmerle Forum Mod

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#5 6 years ago

... How retarded. This stuff shouldn't even be possible, let alone easy. Seriously - you found the passwords in some emails? Jesus. What a cluster fuck for the security services.




Commissar MercZ

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#6 6 years ago

ElCommissar;5607799What a bunch of assholes. Harassing lawyers who defended a United States Marine? Do they not understand the legal process? Why not go after any number of the real scumbag lawyers out there? [/quote]

Oh, there's plenty of scumbag lawyers- but in terms of those that have created a pretty negative image for the US abroad, I think those involved with the Haditha murder cases is pretty shocking. The emails revealed show some nasty angles to this case- the fact that no one got seriously punished for an act that had caused relations between troops and locals to get even worse is rather sad. Just seeing how Iraq reacted to the news of the decision was telling enough I mean, I believe you said earlier that people like Private Manning are a 'disgrace' to the US's image- what about those that have killed civilians 'acting under orders' and getting off more or less scot-free?

And interfering with a legtimate criminal investigation because they're mad over Megaupload? America, where it's okay for the TSA to fondle our balls at the airport but God forbid you mess with our torrents. :rolleyes:

Aren't concerned that the government can just shut down websites on the fly like that? SOPA/PIPA not show you anything? That kind of disruption to internet activity apparently isn't concerning, ok. I agree with your last bit about internet security though.

[QUOTE=Nemmerle;5607825]... How retarded. This stuff shouldn't even be possible, let alone easy. Seriously - you found the passwords in some emails? Jesus. What a cluster fuck for the security services.

Yeah, considering how much money is poured into domestic security and law enforcement nowadays, one would think they could prevent things like this. But they'll just keep deflecting it with appeals to patriotism and moral outrage.




Nemmerle Forum Mod

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#7 6 years ago

Mmm-hmm. The patriotism bit suggests a thought to me: Perhaps this sort of thing is an intentional flaw.

Like when you're boxing and you leave a hole in your guard you know is there to tempt them in - and then, if the other person goes for it, you've got them cold.

Creating pretext....

Commissar MercZ;5608298Oh, there's plenty of scumbag lawyers- but in terms of those that have created a pretty negative image for the US abroad, I think those involved with the Haditha murder cases is pretty shocking. The emails revealed show some nasty angles to this case- the fact that no one got seriously punished for an act that had caused relations between troops and locals to get even worse is rather sad. Just seeing how Iraq reacted to the news of the decision was telling enough I mean, I believe you said earlier that people like Private Manning are a 'disgrace' to the US's image- what about those that have killed civilians 'acting under orders' and getting off more or less scot-free?

Amen. If you hung those people out by their balls, you'd have looked a hell of a lot better.