Arrested for asking a policeman for his badge number 35 replies

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Blank Stare

AE

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24th July 2004

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#11 11 years ago

Nemmerle;4934090The woman essentially asked for his collar number, which he is under no obligation to give her. She could have asked for his warrant card, but since she said she wanted it to file a complaint and since - at least according to the film - he hadn't done anything worthy of complaint yet the request would be deemed unreasonable. Since he knows the complaint would be eronious granting the request would arguably have been aiding her to comit a crime. Meaning he would only really have been breaking the law if he HAD shown it to her.

It may not have been the world's finest arrest but she got off much more lightly than she could have done.They didn't do her for assaulting a police officer, (since I saw her appear to kick one of them,) they didn't do her for resisting arrest, which again they could have done. True, she didn't really hurt any of them and I think you'd be hard put to get the CPS to prosecute because of a lack of public interest, but if you want to talk about what the law says....

In my opinion she was intentionally being an awkward shit and got smacked down for it. Boo hoo.

This post delivers.




Smitty025

The local Paultard

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24th May 2003

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#12 11 years ago
Nemmerle;4934090The woman essentially asked for his collar number, which he is under no obligation to give her. She could have asked for his warrant card, but since she said she wanted it to file a complaint and since - at least according to the film - he hadn't done anything worthy of complaint yet the request would be deemed unreasonable. Since he knows the complaint would be eronious granting the request would arguably have been aiding her to comit a crime. Meaning he would only really have been breaking the law if he HAD shown it to her.

I don't really know how it works over there but what is the difference between a warrant card and a collar number?

Here in the U.S. a police officer is obligated to give you his badge number anytime you ask for any reason, regardless of whether he thinks it's "reasonable" or not.




Nemmerle Advanced Member

Voice of joy and sunshine

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26th May 2003

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#13 11 years ago
Smitty025;4934171I don't really know how it works over there but what is the difference between a warrant card and a collar number?

A collar number isn't really unique, it's like a callsign; some areas will have different ways of annotating the number to show what division you work in but there'll usually be a few people out there with the same number. A warrant card is a card that verifies your legal authority; back in the day when there was a distinction between a constable and a watchman this would be whatever said you were a constable. Generally speaking it'll be kept in the wallet opposite the badge. It has a picture of you, a unique service number that identifies you specifically, the symbol of the police area you work in, and a hologram for purposes of authentication. Sometimes it will also carry areas for additional authorities you may have, firearms for instance.




Admiral Donutz Advanced Member

Wanna go Double Dutch?

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9th December 2003

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#14 11 years ago

Nemmerle;4934090The woman essentially asked for his collar number, which he is under no obligation to give her. She could have asked for his warrant card, but since she said she wanted it to file a complaint and since - at least according to the film - he hadn't done anything worthy of complaint yet the request would be deemed unreasonable. Since he knows the complaint would be eronious granting the request would arguably have been aiding her to comit a crime. Meaning he would only really have been breaking the law if he HAD shown it to her.

It may not have been the world's finest arrest but she got off much more lightly than she could have done.They didn't do her for assaulting a police officer, (since I saw her appear to kick one of them,) they didn't do her for resisting arrest, which again they could have done. True, she didn't really hurt any of them and I think you'd be hard put to get the CPS to prosecute because of a lack of public interest, but if you want to talk about what the law says....

In my opinion she was intentionally being an awkward shit and got smacked down for it. Boo hoo.

I don't know the difference between those two, as far as I'm aware overhere the police simply has a police ID (badge/cart whatever) which allows you to identify that police officer and what their authority (workfield) is. And any citizen can ask for any officer (or other goverment official or people who ask to enter your property like the gasmeterguy, cableguy etc.) for identification. Wether that request is reasonable or not doesn't matter (that would be quite a loophole, the officer could then refuse to abide the request because of whatever reason and potentialy get away with it).

It's quite simple: she asks ID, he shows ID, she may use ID to file complaint, police looks at complaint and may reject it as "false" or such.




Mitch Connor

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6th August 2008

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#15 11 years ago

I like when she asks him to get off her foot and the only reason he's doing that is so she won't struggle. And as soon as he lets off her foot she starts trying to kick and squirm. The officers may not have handled the job in the best manner but the "victims" weren't exactly upright and proper citizens. Police officers are just like any other human being in that they do make mistakes on occasion, so to treat them as tyrants is like saying a surgeon who couldn't save a terminal patient is a "butcher". It's an unfair accusation as none of us were there to see it all.




EO Violation

If you ain't Cav, you ain't...

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#16 11 years ago

Oh for fuck's sake...

Yep, we're clearly entering a police state just like 1984.

Seriously?

Has this ever happened to you? Ever happened to anyone you know? Of course not. Stories about cops being douchebags are isolated for the most part. Just because some jagoff goes out and screws up big time like this doesn't mean cops are all out to trample on your freedom. They're human beings just like everyone else. Act all retarded with 'em, and they're going to get pissed off. Act civil, and you're good.

I dunno, maybe that's just because my driver's license has a picture of me in ACUs.




NiteStryker

Biggest F-ing A-hole 2010

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24th April 2003

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#17 11 years ago

Jeff this thread is fail. :thumbsdown:




emonkies

I'm too cool to Post

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16th July 2003

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#18 11 years ago

And here I thought heavy handed cops were a US trademark. I guess we dont have the market cornered.

While I think the women were probably liberal twits who probably run on at the mouth a bit much it also seems the two were singled out for the very reason that they belong to a organization that watches the watchers.

The claim was that the man was not wearing any identifiable markingas or ID and she would have been in her right to ask for identification. When she asked for another photograph and she and her friend were grabbed and taken across the road and restrained. IMHO they did nothing wrong to incur the treatment. After they were arrested yes she could be arrested for resisting arrest. But I see no reason the two women were treated as they were other than the video show them being ID'd and singled out. I do fully believe that the two were removed and detained to prevent anyone from recording any happenings at the protests.

Cops in the US have repeatedly done the same thing but there seems to be better accountability in the UK. US cops can literally get away with murder once the blue line kicks in. I have seen people arrested just for taking pictures and I have seen cops confiscate cameras.

In the US a cop in uniform has a badge he wears with a badge number. He is supposed to wear that badge while in uniform and in plain clothes usually will have it on him. Its as simple as reading the number on the badge.

My city of Indianapolis has had its fair share of jackass cops.

Like the 4 cops who were drunk and jumped a black guy on the street and when a white guy who happened by tried to help the black guy he wound up getting arrested and beaten up. Turns out the 4 drunk guys were undercover cops who ID themselves when cops showed up and the two suspects were arrested and supposedly beaten while in custody.

Police Brutality in Indianapolis

Or the infamous story of the 16 year old kid who was sitting in the back seat of a cop car with his hands cuffed behind him and he still managed to shoot himself in the side of the head. FBI investigated that one.

Michael Taylor: The recent police encounters have exacerbated tensions between the African-American community and the predominantly white police force stemming from earlier cases that were not resolved to the community's satisfaction. In one, sixteen-year-old Michael Taylor was shot in the head while he was handcuffed with his hands behind his back in a police patrol car in September 1987; the police and a coroner contended that it was a suicide.15 Nonetheless, in a civillawsuit a jury awarded Taylor's family approximately $3 million dollars; as of September 1997, the city was appealing the case.16 After the jury found against the city, the Justice Department said that it would reconsider the case. Because the explanation provided by the police seemed so absurd, many African-Americans were outraged and cited it as an example of impunity, even ten years later.

Here is a link to some of the incidents. Shielded from Justice: Indianapolis

IMHO this is a good article.

America?s Police Brutality Pandemic By Paul Craig Roberts Dandelion Salad

Yet another disturbing aspect is that a minority of citizens will justify each act of police brutality no matter how brutal and how unprovoked. For example, WNDU.com’s poll of its viewers found that 64.2% agreed that Snyder was a victim of police brutality, but 27.8% thought that Snyder got what was coming to him. “Law and order conservatives” and other authoritarian personalities invariably defend acts of police brutality.



Roaming East

Ultima ratio regum

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7th November 2005

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#19 11 years ago

It varies from region to region. Metro cops tend to be on the level. Local smokies tend to be sub-educated knuckle draggers. Ive been hassled by cops plenty of times and the ones that always annoyed me were the unprofessional power trippers out in the rural and suburban environs




Dot Com

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#20 11 years ago
EO Violation;4934517Has this ever happened to you?

It hasn't happened to most people because they rightfully piss themselves whenever a cop is present. Cops are the law and can hide behind the shield any time they want. If they happen to commit some unsavory crime, they are protected by the blue wall of comradery. Like a fraternity, each cop will protect the other even at the cost of an innocent civilian. They hold the power to lie their asses off and get away with it.

I trust a cop as much as I trust any other stranger.

Just because some jagoff goes out and screws up big time like this doesn't mean cops are all out to trample on your freedom.

If cops are complacent enough to follow the hypocritical and bullshit enforcement of the "War on Drugs", then they are out to trample my freedom. "To serve and protect" in some cases, "To annoy and harass" in many others. Why solve real crimes when you can cuff a lone reefer smoker minding his own business in the park or some guy taking a swig out of a wine bottle in public. It's great for the prison industrial complex and provides jobs!

And please spare me "the law is the law" diatribe. It's a lame argument that holds no water.

I dunno, maybe that's just because my driver's license has a picture of me in ACUs.

I don't know the police/military relationship, so I can't tell ya.