Benazir Bhutto 'killed in blast' 45 replies

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emonkies

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#41 12 years ago

True or False: Did Abu ʿAli Al-Ḥusayn Ibn ʿAbd Allah Ibn Sina, aka Avincenna, write "The Canon Of Medicine" which was used by Muslim AND Western Universities til the 19th century?

True or False: Did Abu Musa Jābir ibn Hayyān, aka Gerber, make any significant contributions to the art of Alchemy which became the Science of Chemistry?

True or False: Did Muhammad Ibn Musa Al-Khwarizmi have any influence or play any role in Modern Mathematics?

True or False: Did Ibn al-Haytham make any contributions to the field of Optics and Physics? Did he or did he not write the "Book Of Optics"?

Was the city of Cordoba a accident? Was it by chance that Cordoba was considered one of the largest and most advanced cities in all of Europe while under the Caliphate of Cordoba?

Sure the west may have developed the technologies later but history remembers who did it first. Many ideas and technologies existed but History often remembers who brought it all together.

Were the Romans that great of a Civilization or did they borrow alot from the Greeks and other conquered territories?

To say Islamic culture had no effect on history and society is like saying China or Rome had no influence.

No one is saying Islamic culture was the saviour of civilization.

But to dismiss any accomplishments with the wave of a hand is ignorant and borderline racist. You are stereotyping.




Pietje

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#42 12 years ago
Anlushac11;4138079True or False: Did Abu ʿAli Al-Ḥusayn Ibn ʿAbd Allah Ibn Sina, aka Avincenna, write "The Canon Of Medicine" which was used by Muslim AND Western Universities til the 19th century? True or False: Did Abu Musa Jābir ibn Hayyān, aka Gerber, make any significant contributions to the art of Alchemy which became the Science of Chemistry? True or False: Did Muhammad Ibn Musa Al-Khwarizmi have any influence or play any role in Modern Mathematics? True or False: Did Ibn al-Haytham make any contributions to the field of Optics and Physics? Did he or did he not write the "Book Of Optics"? Was the city of Cordoba a accident? Was it by chance that Cordoba was considered one of the largest and most advanced cities in all of Europe while under the Caliphate of Cordoba? Sure the west may have developed the technologies later but history remembers who did it first. Many ideas and technologies existed but History often remembers who brought it all together. Were the Romans that great of a Civilization or did they borrow alot from the Greeks and other conquered territories? To say Islamic culture had no effect on history and society is like saying China or Rome had no influence. No one is saying Islamic culture was the saviour of civilization. But to dismiss any accomplishments with the wave of a hand is ignorant and borderline racist. You are stereotyping.

In that case i have a question for you. Why is it that Islamitic cultures are seriously lagging behind compared to other countries. Surely if they are so advanced then they should be far ahead of us. Am i right or wrong here? That is what i have been saying all the time. I do not deny that there where Muslim born scientists that invented or advanced certain things but to claim that they all invented it on their own is beyond ridicilious. They borrowed alot from other cultures. Even then most Muslim born scientists where more often then not considered to be heretics and atleast one of them, al-Razi was even considered to be a blasphemer because he didnt adhere to the Islam and even mocked it. For example, the algebraic concept of “zero”, is erroneously attributed to Islam, but it was, in fact, created by the Hindus and merely introduced to the West by Muslims - along with the products of other cultures that were found to be useful to their new rulers. Chess is another interesting example. One interesting point is most of those renowned Muslim born scientists were not Arabians. Such as: Al-Khwarizmi (Uzbekistan); Al-Razi (Tehran); Al-Ghazzali (Khorman, Iran); Al-Tabari (Tabristan); Al-Farabi (Turkistan); Al-Biruni (Khwarizm, Uzbekistan); Ibn Sina (Bukhara, Central Asia); Ibn Rushd (Cordoba, Spain) and so on. All those scientists/philosophers happened to be sons of Muslim. But these links here explains it on a more appriotate way. American Thinker: Hyping Islam 's role in the History of Science Cryptic Subterranean: Islamic Invention?




emonkies

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#43 12 years ago

Once again and I did state it above I am referring to Islam as a religious based cultural area within defined boundaries, not by the persons actual religious belief.

Im sure there are Muslims who arent devout followers just as there are Christians who dont go to Church every Sunday. Does that mean the person is not religious?

Was Martin Luther not being religious when he nailed the 95 theses to the church door in Wittenburg and thereby defied the Catholic Church? Were Muslim Scholars any less religious for criticizing their faith?

Some of the Islamic scholars got in trouble with the Muslim religion just as Galileo did with the Catholic Church.

So you have to be born a Arab and be a devout Muslim for it to count, is that it?

Here's a rebuttle for you. Why has any civilization fallen? Sumerian, Babylonian, Egyptian, Greek, Roman, Persians, etc?

Why did Europe fall into the Dark Ages after Rome fell?

Al-Khwarizmi was born in Uzbekistan but where did he spend most of his life? In Baghdad studying in "The House Of Wisdom".

And you did not answer my questions. The men I listed contributed to science and society. Yes the book The Canon of Health was used in Universities

One of your links mocks the Islamic use of "Camera Obscura" since its obviously a latin term.

Tell me then what Camera Obscura translates to from Latin to English. Also please if you would tell me what Arabic to English "Al-Bayt al-Muthlim" translates to?

Also Ibn Al-Haitham is erronously credited with inventing the term Camera Obscura. He did not. What he did do was conduct experiments and made detailed notes thus setting a precedence for Scientific process requiring experiments and repeatable results.

Rosanna Gorini wrote the following on Ibn al-Haytham's introduction of the scientific method:

"According to the majority of the historians al-Haytham was the pioneer of the modern scientific method. With his book he changed the meaning of the term optics and established experiments as the norm of proof in the field. His investigations are based not on abstract theories, but on experimental evidences and his experiments were systematic and repeatable."

What Ibn al-Haytham did do was be one of the first persons to describe that light travels in time, that it takes light time to go from point A and arrive at point B.

He is also one of the first to put in writing a accurate description of how the Camera Obscura works. He is also one of the first to correctly state that the smaller the pinhole is the clearer the picture is.




Pietje

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#44 12 years ago
Anlushac11;4138473Long text[/quote] Correct, i did not answer your questions but i will do so in this post on different way, though. However, my question, which you didnt answer, remains though why are Islamitic cultures lagging behind compared to other cultures? However, i do believe that alot what you mentioned has to do with the so called Mu’tazillites and the liberal minded Abbasid Kingdom. Keep in mind i left out some parts which arent relevant to the discussion. The link that i posted might be not suited for all people, though. Islam Watch - "Nostalgia of Islamic Golden Age vs. History of Science" by Syed Kamran Mirza [quote=]In conclusion, I can unambiguously summarize the fact that the so called Islamic Golden Age...rather it was due to short-lived opportunity of freethinking and rationalism induced by the famous Mu’tazillites and facilitated by the liberal minded Abbasid Kingdom. What was the ideology of Mu’tazila which actually opened the window for rational thinkers? The defining philosophy of Mu’tazila was freewill, rationalism and scientific thought which was rooted in the Hellenic-age Greek philosophy. Mu’tazila ideology was greatly promoted during Abbasid Caliphate (8-13th century) but after that Islamic re-incarnation by Ahadiths collection by Muslim al –hajjaj, al-Bukhari, Abu daud, al-Timidi and rise of islamic zealots by the leadership of Imam Ghazali put the final nail to the coffin of defeated Mu’tazillites—leading to the end of enlightenment during 13th century and subsequently rise of Islamic devoutness (darkness of close minds and superstitions) in the Islamic world, which ended the so called Islamic Golden Age for good.



emonkies

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#45 12 years ago

Christianity recovered from the Dark Ages and the power of the Church was contained as people finally saw the Church as being power hungry.

Unfortunately it seems Islam did not recover from their religious reformation.




Pietje

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#46 12 years ago
Anlushac11;4138595Christianity recovered from the Dark Ages and the power of the Church was contained as people finally saw the Church as being power hungry. Unfortunately it seems Islam did not recover from their religious reformation.

Unfortunate indeed, the way things look now it wont be happening any time soon either. Who knows how Islamitic cultures would be in the modern day if the Mu’tazillites were not wiped out. Perhaps they would be standing on equal foot with other cultures instead of lagging behind. One cant help but wonder at all the things that could have been invented or improved if the Mu’tazillites where to cooperate with scientists from other cultures. Sadly, this is nothing but wishful thinking.