Christopher Hitchens dies at 62 6 replies

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Commissar MercZ

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#1 6 years ago

BBC News - Christopher Hitchens dies after battle with cancer

Christopher Hitchens dies after battle with cancer

British author, literary critic and journalist Christopher Hitchens has died, aged 62, according to Vanity Fair magazine.

He died from pneumonia, a complication of the esophageal cancer he was suffering from, at a Texas hospital.

Vanity Fair said there would "never be another like Christopher".

He is survived by his wife, Carol Blue, and their daughter, Antonia, and his children from a previous marriage, Alexander and Sophia.

Vanity Fair editor Graydon Carter described the writer as someone "of ferocious intellect, who was as vibrant on the page as he was at the bar".

"Those who read him felt they knew him, and those who knew him were profoundly fortunate souls."

Mr Hitchens was born in Portsmouth, in 1949 and graduated from Oxford in 1970. He became contributing editor to Vanity Fair in November 1992.

Prolific writer

He wrote for numerous publications including The Times Literary Supplement, the Daily Express, the London Evening Standard, Newsday and The Atlantic.

He was the author of 17 books, including The Trial of Henry Kissinger, God is not Great, How Religion Poisons Everything, and a memoir, Hitch-22.

Arguably, a collection of his essays, was released this year.

Another thing he was notable for was providing another angle of defense for the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, at least to American viewers, where he was invited by conservative commentators for that purpose. But of course he'll be remembered for his vocal opinions on all religions.




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#2 6 years ago

Christian commentators can finally stop the speculating as to whether he'll undergo a deathbed conversion.




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#3 6 years ago
Emperor Benedictine;5594008Christian commentators can finally stop the speculating as to whether he'll undergo a deathbed conversion.

Knowing them they might get an 'inside' scoop that he did so, even if it's false. I recall for example a story about Darwin, over 30 years after his death, published by someone claiming she was there in his last days when he 'returned' to his faith and published a story to that effect, which was repeatedly recounted by commentators then, and for decades afterwards even though it was false.

Another story I remember reading regarding a Marxist theoretician and prisoner in Mussolini's jails, Antonio Gramsci, who for decades after his death was claimed (by a priest) that he had returned back to Catholicism before his death, even though it wasn't reported then or by records then either. Still persisted considering the role Gramsci had in the Communist Party, the biggest opposition to the more Catholic-influenced PPP. Of course there'd be an interest in killing the Communist's 'sacred cow' as it were by claiming the erstwhile atheist recanted.




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#4 6 years ago

There was no other like him.




Nemmerle Forum Mod

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#5 6 years ago

If you liked Hitchens' writing I suspect you would also like Robert Ingersoll's Some Mistakes of Moses - published more than a hundred years earlier - who had many of the same lines of attack.

http://www.archive.org/stream/somemistakesmose00ingeuoft#page/n11/mode/2up

As for myself, it is my belief that he was a bad political commentator who made a quick buck popularising other people's arguments, (which had been made in many cases hundreds of years earlier,) at a time when the thing he was arguing for was already in full swing. If you look at the rates of decay in religion his books don't seem to have caused a whole lot of difference.

I'm not exactly thrilled he's dead, but to my mind he was primarily a cheerleader for the Iraq war rather than a philosopher.




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#6 6 years ago

Aye, his views on the war I strongly disagreed with. I did however like his verbose critiques of religious monstrosities.

The regurgitated views you mentioned, yeah... originality in this area of philosophy is is a rare commodity.

I swear Hitchens had a token of Nietzsche to him, but very little. It was probably the similarities in disdain. Oh and I do like Ingorsoll




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#7 6 years ago

Nemmerle;5595877

I'm not exactly thrilled he's dead, but to my mind he was primarily a cheerleader for the Iraq war rather than a philosopher.

That position has probably done more to wreck his standing among his original supporters/followers more than anything else I think. I know he always 'justified' this by claiming he had seen real horrors from the effects of Anfal and the 1991 uprisings in Iraq, but I'm really not sure why he thought that the recent war would necessarily 'fix' that. I guess his antics in the past decade probably did a lot to make what ever 'contributions' from the previous years irrelevant.