Conspiracy: Putin 6 replies

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Admiral Donutz VIP Member

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#1 14 years ago

Is Vladimir Putin really as good as he wants us to think he is? Despite the collapse of the USSR, Vladamir Putin, has placed many of his former KGB colleagues in positions of authority alongside him. Is he trying to gain more and more power by accusing the Chechnians for things they didn't done? Those bombings suited him wel, he gained (international) support on his own war on terror by it. Some things look to support the fact that Puttin is behind or atleast knew that the Federal Security Service (FSB) commit "terrorist" attacks, allowing Putin to accuse the Chechnians thereby legalising a "war" against them.

Is Putin (the FSB) behind the 9/99 attacks? the following articel which I found proves that he does:

[size=+2] The Terror of 9/99: Fact Sheet[/size]

The Bombings

September 1999 was the month of terror in Russia. Several bombs went off within days of each other, killing nearly 300 and injuring more than 550.

On August 31st, 1999, a bomb exploded during rush hour at the Manezh shopping mall in the center of Moscow. Forty people were injured, one person died.

On September 4th, a truck exploded in the military housing complex in the city of Buinaksk. Sixty-four people died under the ruins of a five-story building, 23 of them children. 133 were injured.

On the night of September 9th, a powerful blast destroyed an apartment building on Guryanov Street in Moscow. Ninety-four people died, 164 were injured.

On September 13th at 5a.m. - another blast on Kashirskoye Shosse in Moscow killed 119 people in their sleep.

Three days later, on September 16th, an apartment building in Volgodonsk went up into the air. Seventeen people died under the ruins of the building, 72 were injured.

On September 22nd, an imminent explosion was averted in the city of Ryazan. Sacks of white substance and a detonator were found in the basement of an apartment building. Experts determined that the white powder was hexogen, a powerful explosive. The residents were evacuated, and soon congratulated by government officials with having been saved from a deadly explosion, as the bomb was supposed to go off at 5:30am.

The Ryazan local police got on the trail and, within 48 hours, arrested the suspects. Much to the surprise of the arresting officers, the terrorists produced identification from Russia's Federal Security Service (FSB), a successor of the KGB. Faced with a national scandal, the government changed the story and claimed that the incident in Ryazan was not an averted terrorist act, but FSB's 'readiness exercise'. Nikolai Patrushev, director of the FSB, said that the sacks contained sugar and the detonator was a dummy.

The Ryazan incident led to widespread speculations about the involvement of Russian secret services in all previous explosions. But the FSB classified all Ryazan evidence "top secret" for reasons of "national security". (Full Ryazan story)"

The War and Putin's Presidency

The government blamed the explosions on Chechen separatists, swaying the public opinion in favor of the new war. On September 23, 1999, Prime Minister Vladimir Putin ordered air strikes against Chechnya. The nationalist hysteria set off by the bombings helped Mr. Putin win Presidential elections in 2000.

But the quick, victorious war that the new President promised to the Russian people turned out to be a bloody quagmire. Thousands of Russian soldiers, and tens of thousand of Chechen civilians have been killed, and many more lost their homes, making Chechnya a humanitarian catastrophe. Atrocities penetrated by the Russian army - unsurpassed in Europe since World War II - prompted accusations of genocide.

As for the bombings of September '99, in the words of the Wall Street Journal, "questions about those attacks, like Russia's conduct in Chechnya, continue to follow Mr. Putin like a shadow", and indeed put the very legitimacy of the government in question. According to opinion polls, about half of the Russians believe that the FSB may have been complicit in the bombings.

Official Investigation

Over the years, the authorities have been desperately trying to prove a Chechen connection to the bombings.

In the aftermath of the blasts, the police picked up Timur Dakhilgov, a native of Chechnya, who confessed to the bombings under torture, only to be released a few weeks later without charges. By the end of 2001, five Chechen rebels had been accused by the FSB of the Moscow attacks, but the charges were dropped for lack of evidence.

In December 2003, two Chechen rebels, Adam Dekkushev and Yusuf Krymshamkhalov, went on trial for complicity in the bombings. Their trial was closed to the press and the public. According to unofficial reports, no evidence linking the defendants to the Moscow blasts was presented. Dekkushev pleaded innocent on all counts. Krymshamkhalov admitted involvement in the preparation of the Volgodonsk bomb. But he said that he later came to suspect the organizers -- who had told him that the bomb was for a Russian military target -- of being FSB plants.

According to the FSB, the main suspect in the Moscow bombings is Achemez Gochiyayev, who is believed to be hiding in Georgia. The FSB says he personally rented the basements in the Moscow apartment houses where the bombs were planted.

A Note from the Prime Suspect: What Gochiyaev told Litvinenko

In July 2002, Alexander Litvinenko, an ex-FSB agent who has been granted political asylum in England, and has co-authored a book about the bombings, published a letter from Achemez Gochiyayev, the main suspect, sent from his hideout.

Gochiyayev claimed that he had nothing to do with the bombings, but had been framed by a business associate, whom he later suspected of being an FSB agent. The man, he said, had rented the basements in four residential buildings, ostensibly as storage space for their company. Notably, Gochiyayev said that after the second blast, before going into hiding, he tipped off the police about the two other bombs. The authorities never explained how these bombs were found.

A Lawyer in Jail: The Findings of Mikhail Trepashkin

Mikhail Trepashkin, a lawyer representing a victim's family, was arrested in Moscow on a fabricated charge a week before he was to take part in the bombings trial of December 2003. At the trial, he planned to present new evidence linking the FSB to the Moscow blasts.

After Trepashkin's arrest, a Moscow newspaper published his report. He found the landlord of one of the bombed buildings who identified the man who had rented the space. This was not Gochiyayev, but an undercover agent of the FSB who specialized in infiltration of the Chechen groups, and who was killed in a hit-and-run car accident some months after the blasts.

Trepashkin is held for illegal arms possession, but he says that a gun has been planted by the FSB in his car in order to prevent him from appearing in court.

Three Suspicious Incidents

Over the years, three other suspicious incidents came to light, which were never investigated or explained by the authorities:

- On September 14, 1999, Gennady Seleznev, the speaker of the Duma known for his close links with the FSB, announced a terrorist attack on the previous night. But he made a mistake -- instead of referring to the bombings at Kashirskoye Shosse in Moscow, he spoke about a building blown up in Volgodonsk -- three days before it actually happened.

- Shortly after the Moscow bombings, a soldier, Pvt. Pinyaev, has discovered sacks marked "sugar" at a military warehouse he was guarding. He took some to sweeten his tea only to discover that the substance was anything but sweet. An investigation ensued establishing that the sacks contained hexogen, the explosive used in the bombings. The story was leaked to the press and led to the FSB's investigation of the "breach of national security" and the transfer of Pvt. Pinyaev.

- In March 2002, Nikita Chekulin, the Deputy Director of Moscow Explosives Research Institute, requested asylum in the U.K. He disclosed documents demonstrating that large quantities of hexogen have been illegally transferred from military depots to several front companies, which he suspected were set up by the FSB. An investigation of these transactions initiated by the police has been suppressed by the FSB.

Unofficial Investigation: Two Lawmakers Dead

The pro-government majority in the State Duma has blocked the initial efforts of a parliamentary investigation into the 9/99 blasts. An independent Public Commission for investigation of the bombings headed by human rights activist Sergei Kovalev has been formed in Moscow, but its activities have been hampered by lack of official cooperation.

A member of Duma, Sergey Yushenkov, who called for parliamentary inquiry and who was the driving force of the Public Commission has been assassinated. His colleague, Yuri Shchekochikhin, was apparently poisoned three months later. Another member of the Commission, Yuli Rybakov, has lost his seat in the Duma in what observers called a rigged election. After the lost of its three most prominent members, the activities of the Public Commission have come to a hault.

source: http://eng.terror99.ru/explosions/




MrFancypants Forum Admin

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#2 14 years ago

An interesting article. But somehow I doubt that it was written by a neutral or objective author, as there are only information supporting one side. I also thought about starting a similar thread with all those things going on in Russia at the moment.




MrFancypants Forum Admin

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#3 14 years ago

bump, that article is ineteresting, read it, also if it's long. You guys start threads about the war in Iraq every second day, why not read this? :)




Mihail VIP Member

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#4 14 years ago

So? Do you question when former CIA agents get apointed new postions? Even if so, why would you not surround yourself with people you know you can trust? Thats what president bush did, he made sure he was surrounded by those with ties with oil companies. I find that even more so intresting.

And there has always been support here about the conflict down south, And there always has been these sorts of random attacks since 1994, I highly doubt putin is behind the cause of recent events since his term.




Admiral Donutz VIP Member

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#5 14 years ago

Well he gained a lot of support after all those attacks. The attacks suited him nicely, maybe a little bit too nicely?

I have this really intresting article in a dutch magazine, i don't have it here ATM but i will post it in the weekend. BTW i think that Bush is far more worse then Putin, but i don't think that Putin is totally innocent or "clean" either.




Red Toxa

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#6 14 years ago
Großadmiral DönitzWell he gained a lot of support after all those attacks. The attacks suited him nicely, maybe a little bit too nicely? I have this really intresting article in a dutch magazine, i don't have it here ATM but i will post it in the weekend. BTW i think that Bush is far more worse then Putin, but i don't think that Putin is totally innocent or "clean" either.[/QUOTE] At least he is better than Eltsyn, Kuchma or Lukashenko. [QUOTE=Großadmiral Dönitz]Is Vladimir Putin really as good as he wants us to think he is? Despite the collapse of the USSR, Vladamir Putin, has placed many of his former KGB colleagues in positions of authority alongside him. Is he trying to gain more and more power by accusing the Chechnians for things they didn't done? Those bombings suited him wel, he gained (international) support on his own war on terror by it. Some things look to support the fact that Puttin is behind or atleast knew that the Federal Security Service (FSB) commit "terrorist" attacks, allowing Putin to accuse the Chechnians thereby legalising a "war" against them. .

Same with bush, CIA and 9/11... so what now?




Master of Reality

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#7 14 years ago

putins the best president Russia has had (obviously not counting the USSR). but he just makes life easy for the rich, and it just gets harder for the poor.

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