Court rules Brexit "Article 50" can't be triggered without Parliament approval 19 replies

  • 1
  • 2

Please wait...

FileTrekker Über Admin

I'm spending a year dead for tax reasons.

266,987 XP

15th December 2002

36 Uploads

22,448 Posts

1,693 Threads

#1 1 year ago

So I saw this on the news this morning, the upshot being, that the government can no longer simply invoke Article 50 - it has to go before a vote in Parliament, and only with parliamentary approval can Brexit go ahead.

Now, I don't for one second think that MP's will vote against Brexit, but at least it will ensure a more favourable position at the bargaining table once Article 50 is invoked.

But the question for me is, should MP's vote against Brexit, how will the British public react at this stage? Given how close the referendum was, how many people would have swung to remain, given the effects it had afterwards?

The decision will be appealed yet, so more delays to Brexit in the meantime, though, which just leads to more financial uncertainty.


Danny King | Community Manager | GameFront.com



Lindale Forum Mod

Mister Angry Rules Guy

240,766 XP

1st February 2010

0 Uploads

23,399 Posts

2 Threads

#2 1 year ago

The Disunited Queendom was stronger as a part of the EU. Since Brexit, the constituent nations have done downhill fast.

First, and the biggest red flag, was that the government didn't have a plan. They went into this without thinking of the consequences. As a result, everyone who voted to stay quit their jobs, and everyone who voted to leave also quit because they have no idea what they are doing. The current members of the government are more or less there out of emergency.

Next, the Pound dropped to the lowest it has ever been. It was actually lower than the American Dollar for a few weeks. Which, if your money is worth less than America's, you know you are in trouble.

Now, hate crime has risen 40%, because England has decided that the immigrants are the problem. Basically, England is becoming America, just without the guns.

A lot of English have moved to Scotland. And I foresee Scotland calling for another vote to become independent. This time, I do not think that vote will meet resistance. In fact, a lot of those who originally voted against it have now turned full for it.

And to think all of this is all because the Brexit vote 51/49, essentially a coin toss. Heads, we stay. Tails, we leave. Oh! Tails! Goodbye, EU!

This can be solved in one of three ways, all of which I have spoken about a few times before. 1: Have a plan BEFORE you call a vote. Tell the nation about that plan, and let the citizens analyse that plan. If they approve or not, that is what will determine the outcome of the vote. And the outcome of that vote will be displayed by....

2: Any votes need to be won via 2/3 majority. A coin flip is NOT a valid result when you are dealing with the fate of nations. If a vote should meet less than 2/3 one way or the other, redo it until it does. If the second results in a coin toss result, then....

3: If your votes are consistency reaching a coin flip, you need to analyse why this is happening. Then you need to rethink your plan on that basis. Don't call the vote until you have a plan that the majority of the nation will agree or disagree.


filesnation_by_lindale_ff-da1kplo.png



Serio VIP Member

The Dane

149,846 XP

11th November 2006

3 Uploads

12,506 Posts

37 Threads

#3 1 year ago

It's brilliant. I'm seeing Brexiteers calling this "undemocratic" and "against the will of the British public". This is democratic, scuttleheads. This decision is no longer in the hands of an unelected prime minister, but rather the elected and appointed parliament of the United Kingdom.

And yes, this will likely make it a soft Brexit, which will be better for both the UK and the EU. Essentially, rather than a full closure on the borders and freedom of movement, there'll be concessions made(which Steel Queen May would never go along with) in favour of keeping a warm relationship with Brussels.

Also note that the Pound actually soared a bit when this happened. So this is good for the economy. Keep notes, Boris Johnson.




Mikey Über Admin

Caffiene Fuelled Ravings of an undiagnosed Sociopath.

45,264 XP

13th June 2008

1 Uploads

3,844 Posts

213 Threads

#4 1 year ago

Just do what you're gonna do and be fucking done with it. No one will be happy with the result.


Mikey - GameFront.com - Lead Developer



MrFancypants Forum Admin

The Bad

216,813 XP

7th December 2003

0 Uploads

19,996 Posts

6 Threads

#5 1 year ago

Like Serio says, people are often confused about what referendums and democracy. There is a good reason most democratic nations avoid direct democracy - most of the time the population doesn't have a clue. So we vote for people who pretend like they have a clue and let them make the tough decisions.

I'd like the UK to stay in the EU. There are many problems with the EU, but without the UK I don't see it working out in the long term. Individual nation states are not going to fare too well when they try to compete with countries like India or China for global markets.




Serio VIP Member

The Dane

149,846 XP

11th November 2006

3 Uploads

12,506 Posts

37 Threads

#6 1 year ago

I actually have a different view on the EU's future. I think that without the UK, it might have a chance to stand the test of time. From what I've heard, the UK was very much a "divisive force" in Brussels. They wanted Turkey to gain entrance to the EU, whereas France opposed that(and Germany too, I think?). Without the UK's support, and with Erdogan completely going full dictator, that distant fear of a Turkish accession to the EU is now gone. Now, I wasn't too worried about Turkish people or immigration. I was more worried about aligning with a nation that wasn't very happy about democracy.

And yeah - referendums are a way to gauge the public opinion. Often, their results are pursued but they are by no means legally binding. There would be zero legal consequences for any incumbent ministers or Theresa May for failing to invoke Article 50. Zero. 

In theory, letting the public decide is a good idea. In practice, it's a very poor idea. As individuals, we're smart, but as a crowd? We're susceptible to mass hysteria, panic, influence from media and third party sources. We're afraid to stand out and say "I disagree!", even if that can start others doing the same.




Admiral Donutz VIP Member

Wanna go Double Dutch?

735,261 XP

9th December 2003

0 Uploads

71,460 Posts

0 Threads

#7 1 year ago

I consider the UK as a good friend of us Dutch, Germans, Danes etc. But if it comes to real cooperation, unity, the UK just does not seem very enthousiastic. So without the UK the EU might find itself more united and decisive. If the EU would also get reformed such as allowing a Dutchman to vote on a Spanish based party during EU Parlaimential electionsit could emerge stronger from a Brexit.  

Regarding the court ruling, it makes perfect sense to me that a very drastic event or decision like Brexit would need some sort of extra confirmation that the public wants to continue with it and finds the proposed Brexit package reasonable enough so that the Britons can live with the outcome. Either asking parliament to have a say, or IMHO better yet have general elections. Just as you wouldn't want people to decide on the death penalty or who is eligable to vote in elections based on a referendum result! 




M!tch VIP Member

intermittently erratic

130,170 XP

12th March 2004

0 Uploads

11,767 Posts

0 Threads

#8 1 year ago

Bit late, but as a Brexit voter, I am frustrated by the haters that want to stay in what I consider to be a failing EU, run by  politicians that have no idea of the  complexity of the different countries needs or feelings about how the EU is run. .  . this is just another attempt to keep The UK in the EU to serve no one else ego except politicians and civil servant' that are scared of losing their easy lifestyles.

As a Common Market with good trading between the countries, it was a great idea, but then politicians got involved and fucked it up.


Thinking about it.



Serio VIP Member

The Dane

149,846 XP

11th November 2006

3 Uploads

12,506 Posts

37 Threads

#9 1 year ago

"M!tch"Bit late, but as a Brexit voter, I am frustrated by the haters that want to stay in what I consider to be a failing EU, run by  politicians that have no idea of the  complexity of the different countries needs or feelings about how the EU is run. .  . this is just another attempt to keep The UK in the EU to serve no one else ego except politicians and civil servant' that are scared of losing their easy lifestyles.

As a Common Market with good trading between the countries, it was a great idea, but then politicians got involved and fucked it up.

The EU is still a good idea, but the UK was one of the forces that was preventing it from functioning. British politicians were behind the idea of Turkish accession, which is now being blocked by Germany and France. You also have differing ideas on healthcare and education. Whereas the EU pushes the idea of state funded, universal healthcare and education, the UK is moving towards dismantling the NHS and moving towards privatized institutions. It was only a matter of time before the two went their separate ways.




Lindale Forum Mod

Mister Angry Rules Guy

240,766 XP

1st February 2010

0 Uploads

23,399 Posts

2 Threads

#10 1 year ago

The main problem with the EU is certain nations,  such as Greece, not contributing at all. Greece is dead weight on the best of days. I still cannot understand why Greece has not been kicked out of the EU.


filesnation_by_lindale_ff-da1kplo.png



  • 1
  • 2