Dinosaurs 30 replies

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Flash525

The Carbon Comrade

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14th July 2004

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#1 8 years ago

Okay, I know they're all practically dead, and there is little hope of using their bones or other material to make them walk again, but I've been thinking about this in some deep thought. I don't think the Dinosaurs we're wiped out in a mass extinction.

Many people speculate that Dinosaurs died due to a meteorite, a global flood, atmospheric changes, or an alien invasion etc...yeah, okay, I added that last one in there, but it might as well be true if any of the others could be.

Anyway, I'm not going to begin to pretend I know all the evidence here, nor what scientists have so say figured out. I haven't read into everything just yet, so you could say I'm jumping the gun a little bit here, but that's irrelevant for the moment I think. We've essentially got three periods of Dinosaur existence. The Triassic, Jurassic, and Cretaceous.

Now, for an example here of what I am trying to get at, both the Stegosaurus and Allosaurus lived in the late-Jurassic period, others, such as the Triceratops and Tyrannosaurus lived in the late-Cretaceous. I'm pretty sure there wasn't a pre-Cretaceous meteorite that knocked out the Stegosaurus and Allosaurus before the Cretaceous period started.

The question then, is what happened to the Stegosaurus and Allosaurus, along with all others from the Jurassic period? We must also ask what happened to the Triassic Dinosaurs, before the Stegosaurus and Allosaurus came along.

I'm currently thinking that there wasn't no global catastrophe, but that life just evolved, or died out. At some point in the past (to be precise 65 million years ago) Dinosaurs were simply replaced. They weren't annihilated by a meteorite or anything.

To think, Dinosaurs have walked this Earth somewhere between 250 - 65 million years ago. Humanity has walked the Earth for some.. what? 200,000 years? Compared to how long them Dinosaurs were walking around, we've barely been here. It doesn't take much to believe that a specific Dinosaur species evolved over time to become something else (given the time frame allowed).

I only say all this, cause it seems to be the only thing that would explain the loss of Dinosaurs from the Triassic and Jurassic not being around in the Cretaceous.

Thoughts?

PS: Anyone who believes the planet has only been around for 5000 years, please ignore everything I have just written. Your brain hasn't yet developed to a high enough level to be able to contemplate any of this. Thank You! :)




Schofield VIP Member

om :A

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#2 8 years ago

I think both theories are as accurate as the next, it may have been evolution and a catastrophe. And it's 65 million, not 65 billion.=p




Flash525

The Carbon Comrade

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14th July 2004

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#3 8 years ago
Schofield;5377168And it's 65 million, not 65 billion.

My Bad.

Edited.




Rich19

Italicised no more

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14th August 2004

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#4 8 years ago

Aerilon;5377147Okay, I know they're all practically dead, and there is little hope of using their bones or other material to make them walk again, but I've been thinking about this in some deep thought. I don't think the Dinosaurs we're wiped out in a mass extinction.[/quote]

Stop the presses! Throw out all of the old theories! Some guy on a computer gaming forum has had some deep thought on the subject!

Aerilon;5377147Many people speculate that Dinosaurs died due to a meteorite, a global flood, atmospheric changes, or an alien invasion etc...yeah, okay, I added that last one in there, but it might as well be true if any of the others could be.

Anyway, I'm not going to begin to pretend I know all the evidence here, nor what scientists have so say figured out.

It isn't speculation, it's a single carefully laid out theory (and I'm using the word theory in the scientific sense here, so there's no real uncertainty whatsoever about this). The Cretaceous period ended at the K-T extinction which was caused by an impact event. There is evidence for this - there is a thin layer of the chemical element iridium at concentrations hugely greater than normal in essentially all sedimentary layers that are 65 million years old in the world. Iridium is so rare on earth that, essentially, it doesn't occur naturally. Yet we have found it to be very common in meteroites. This thin layer corresponds to a large, irridium rich meteroite crashing into the earth 65 million years ago. We also have a crater that is the correct age.

[QUOTE=Aerilon;5377147]I haven't read into everything just yet, so you could say I'm jumping the gun a little bit here, but that's irrelevant for the moment I think. We've essentially got three periods of Dinosaur existence. The Triassic, Jurassic, and Cretaceous.

Now, for an example here of what I am trying to get at, both the Stegosaurus and Allosaurus lived in the late-Jurassic period, others, such as the Triceratops and Tyrannosaurus lived in the late-Cretaceous. I'm pretty sure there wasn't a pre-Cretaceous meteorite that knocked out the Stegosaurus and Allosaurus before the Cretaceous period started.

The question then, is what happened to the Stegosaurus and Allosaurus, along with all others from the Jurassic period? We must also ask what happened to the Triassic Dinosaurs, before the Stegosaurus and Allosaurus came along.

I'm currently thinking that there wasn't no global catastrophe, but that life just evolved, or died out. At some point in the past (to be precise 65 million years ago) Dinosaurs were simply replaced. They weren't annihilated by a meteorite or anything.

To think, Dinosaurs have walked this Earth somewhere between 250 - 65 million years ago. Humanity has walked the Earth for some.. what? 200,000 years? Compared to how long them Dinosaurs were walking around, we've barely been here. It doesn't take much to believe that a specific Dinosaur species evolved over time to become something else (given the time frame allowed).

I only say all this, cause it seems to be the only thing that would explain the loss of Dinosaurs from the Triassic and Jurassic not being around in the Cretaceous.

Thoughts?

You're thinking along the right lines - afaik there is no Jurassic-Cretaceous extinction event. But there was plenty of time for the Jurrasic dinosaurs to evolve. We know there was an extinction event around 65 million years ago (as opposed to simply having everything evolve into something new) because of the disappearance of the various dinosaur types. The stuff that came after (mainly mammals) show a clear progression from before the event to afterwards, whereas the dinosaur body types etc simply disappear. A dinosaur-like body type to evolve into a mammal-like body type would take an awful long time.




Joe Bonham

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10th December 2005

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#5 8 years ago

That's why we split up that whole timespan into three distinct periods - hundreds of species died off or evolved into something else.




jackripped

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#6 8 years ago

My understanding is the large dino's were all wiped out 65 mill years ago, but the dinosore dna lives on in birds.




Emperor Benedictine

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#7 8 years ago
AerilonI'm currently thinking that there wasn't no global catastrophe, but that life just evolved, or died out. At some point in the past (to be precise 65 million years ago) Dinosaurs were simply replaced. They weren't annihilated by a meteorite or anything. To think, Dinosaurs have walked this Earth somewhere between 250 - 65 million years ago. Humanity has walked the Earth for some.. what? 200,000 years? Compared to how long them Dinosaurs were walking around, we've barely been here. It doesn't take much to believe that a specific Dinosaur species evolved over time to become something else (given the time frame allowed). I only say all this, cause it seems to be the only thing that would explain the loss of Dinosaurs from the Triassic and Jurassic not being around in the Cretaceous.

Aside from the fact that there is strong evidence of an extinction event, why would the natural course of evolution kill off all the dinosaurs in such a short space of time? They seemed to be doing okay for themselves for over a hundred and fifty million years before then (much longer than they've been extinct for). And then what... large reptiles suddenly weren't competitive anymore? Yes, dinosaurs evolved and died out over time like any other species, but that doesn't mean they weren't wiped out by a meteor impact.




Keyser_Soze

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#8 8 years ago

if i remember right, the theory for triassic dinosaurs disappearing was a hypernova (gamma ray burst), although i'm not so sure, as surely that'd wipe out life in its entirety? jurassic dinosaurs died out due to rising sea levels, i think.




AegenemmnoN VIP Member

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#9 8 years ago

Aerilon;5377147

PS: Anyone who believes the planet has only been around for 5000 years, please ignore everything I have just written. Your brain hasn't yet developed to a high enough level to be able to contemplate any of this. Thank You! :)

I see that and raise you:

Jesus_Horses_by_WhiteRabbitxx06.jpg




Zipacna VIP Member

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#10 8 years ago

Aerilon;5377147The question then, is what happened to the Stegosaurus and Allosaurus, along with all others from the Jurassic period? We must also ask what happened to the Triassic Dinosaurs, before the Stegosaurus and Allosaurus came along.

I'm currently thinking that there wasn't no global catastrophe, but that life just evolved, or died out. At some point in the past (to be precise 65 million years ago) Dinosaurs were simply replaced. They weren't annihilated by a meteorite or anything.[/QUOTE]

Well, we're talking about a very long time for this to come along and it is no new theory that old species are replaced by new ones, either because of new enemies against which the new species has a greater advantage or because the new species is better at getting food (mostly for carnivores of course).

[QUOTE=Rich19;5377212]It isn't speculation, it's a single carefully laid out theory (and I'm using the word theory in the scientific sense here, so there's no real uncertainty whatsoever about this). The Cretaceous period ended at the K-T extinction which was caused by an impact event. There is evidence for this - there is a thin layer of the chemical element iridium at concentrations hugely greater than normal in essentially all sedimentary layers that are 65 million years old in the world. Iridium is so rare on earth that, essentially, it doesn't occur naturally. Yet we have found it to be very common in meteroites. This thin layer corresponds to a large, irridium rich meteroite crashing into the earth 65 million years ago. We also have a crater that is the correct age.

Actually, another for me much more plausible theory would be the volcano theory. Two main reasons that would rather discredit the meteorite theory are the following: 1. It is highly unlikely a meteor impact would cover the earth in an evenly distributed layer of Iridium. 2. There is a crater. But where is the meteor? Also, why didn't the crater deform during continental drift? It is possible that the "crater" only formed later. Also, the size the meteor would have to have to cover the entire Earth in a layer of Iridium (especially since the meteor is certainly not 100% Iridium) is cartoonish. (3. A meteor impact would all be good and fine, but what about the actual cause of death of the animals?)

Additionally, this is not the only extinction event we know. The most notable other one is the Perminan-Triassic extinction event. Another one occured at the end of the Cambrian. There are some more but you can look them up yourself. Iridium is not very prominent in the Earth's upper layers, however there are huge quantities in the core. Therefore, a supervolcano event such as the Siberian Traps, which could distribute Iridium over the biggest part of the Earth, if not over the Earth entirely, is plausible. Mass extinction due to climate change happened before and could certainly have happened through a super volcano / several volcanos. The lack of a big magma pouch not far beneath the surface after its presence for a long time could even be the cause for the cooler climate which made it harder for reptiles to survive (since they were accustomed to tropical temperatures virtually everywhere) than for mammals.


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