Drugs 210 replies

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homo sine domino

 

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1st September 2002

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#1 11 years ago

I'd like to here your opinions on drugs, legal and illegal. Why are some legal, why are some illegal? Why should it stay that way or why not?

In my opinion it should be the individual's choice what he or she wants to consume in regard to drugs. I'm not quite able to relate to the average government opinion that alcohol is "ok" while e. g. marihuana is not.

Although I don't approve of excessive drug use, the individual should be free to make his choice. Even if that leads to what some view as a decline in culture.




Guest

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#2 11 years ago

I think drugs should be banned, it corrupts too many people




Analysis

Nice....

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5th September 2007

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#3 11 years ago

Drugs screw up peoples lives. They first take it,then they can't stop. Similar to cigarettes but far worse. You become corrupt,you change and you keep taking. These things should be banned,they are good for noone.:mad:




homo sine domino

 

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#4 11 years ago
Lionman363;4018046Drugs screw up peoples lives. They first take it,then they can't stop.[/quote]It's their life, so why should you care?
Lionman363;4018046Similar to cigarettes but far worse. You become corrupt,you change and you keep taking.[/QUOTE]People should be allowed to change the way they act and think, so long as they don't harm others. [QUOTE=Lionman363;4018046]These things should be banned,they are good for noone.:mad:
The individual knows best, what is good for him and what is not. May I ask what you base this on? The same could possibly be said about pornographic material and other material/activities deemed immoral.[QUOTE=nanobot_swarm;4018034]I think drugs should be banned, it corrupts too many people

Money corrupts, power corrupts, many things corrupt. Banning drugs will not stop people from becoming corrupt, it will only dictate people how to live their life and that's not the government's job.




Angel_Mommy

Angel of death

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17th February 2006

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#5 11 years ago

the government 'okays' alcohol because its NOT a drug, its a drink. marijihana (sp?) on the other hand has been led to cause so many problems, seizers, memory loss and lots of other things people kill over it just so they can get one quick high. now, dont get me wrong, alochol does have its downs as well, liver and kidney problems. but with all things, they both can become addictive, but marijihana has more of an addiction tendicy (though those that have done, or are on it deny that)




Aeroflot

I would die without GF

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2nd May 2003

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#6 11 years ago

Do we have any proof that marijuana is more addictive than alcohol?




foodmaniac2003

Gelato pwns all

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11th March 2006

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#7 11 years ago

I believe that if drugs were to be legalized, there should be no help nor mercy to those who decide to inject/smoke/chew crack/heroine/opium/whatever.

This is due to the fact that if someone is stupid enough to think that downing 3 bottles of cough syrup in 15 minutes isn't going to do anything to them deserves to face the consequences of their actions.

By this I mean: -No medical treatment (ambulance, hospital, etc.), or at least not covered in insurance policy, for those who need it, if their aliments are caused directly or indirectly with the use of drugs. Medical help for this will be much, much more expensive than usual. -The penalty for violent crimes, disturbing the peace, DUI, etc. caused by drug use will be much higher than that not caused by it. -Citizens who decide to exceed certain pre-established limits on drugs deny their right to Medicare or forms of socialized medicine in their old age.




Ensign Riles VIP Member

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#8 11 years ago
Angel_Mommy;4018272the government 'okays' alcohol because its NOT a drug, its a drink.

Alcohol is as much of a drug as the caffeine found in coffee. The medium through which a drug is ingested has no bearing on its status.

From my personal opinion I would like government to continue banning recreational drug use. There is simply no need for it. Going out for a walk on a sunny day is a much healthier high than filling the body with chemicals that will eventually kill it.

Unfortunately prohibition does not work. The only positive I could see from relaxed laws is a possible reduction in crime as supply increased.

But then the question comes to production and regulation. Would we let criminals in other countries produce our drugs? We all know that drug dealers are really honest people would only use the purest of substances. The alternative is the government producing recreational drugs. The last thing I want my tax dollars funding is someone else's addiction which could end up killing a member of my family.




masked_marsoe VIP Member

Heaven's gonna burn your eyes

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16th April 2005

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#9 11 years ago

I think drugs should be legalised for personal, private use.

But at the same time it is pointless to do it in a society that cannot cope with the realities of drugs. So for me the pre-condition on the legalisation of drugs is proof that they can be used and enjoyed in a non-destructive manner.




elevatormusic

slouching toward nirvana

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19th July 2006

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#10 11 years ago

Drugs should be legalized and regulated. Making them illegal hasn't truly worked yet. Without the creation of a totalitarian police state it won't. If it's going to exist, why shouldn't the government attempt to make money off it? Consider, the amount of marijuana smuggled from Canada to the United States is approximately $7 billion, and the amount the United States government spends on marijuana prohibition? Approximately $7 billion. Governments should get involved, make some money, impose taxes on it.

The only real way for the government to affect the drug trade is to try and get in on the action themselves, this is also a possible solution to harder drugs as well. That money should then be taken and put towards health care, social services and education... things that MIGHT just have some real benefit.

Of course no country is really ready for that. The original reasons for the criminalization of marijuana include such lovely claims as: - "Marijuana is the most violence causing drug in the history of mankind." - "Marijuana is an addictive drug which produces in its users insanity, criminality and death." - "The primary reason to outlaw marijuana is its effects on the degenerate races." - "This marijuana can cause white women to seek sexual relations with Negroes, entertainers and any others."

Take that as a beginning and add another 60 years of bullshit rhetoric backed up by biased studies and you have the modern government perspective. The notion of a 'gateway' drug, or that marijuana is physically addictive, or that it makes you a complete moron and the myth that it's stronger now than ever before.

To be honest I find the concept of the government saying I can't burn a plant if I want to laughable, as well as the opinions of those who don't smoke pot or do drugs themselves. This is a group of people who really have no idea what they're talking about, they haven't experienced what they're trying to deal with or malign.

Have some sources: •Info Facts – Marijuana, NIDA, InfoFacts - Marijuana •Marijuana – Drug Facts, ONDCP, Facts& Figures: Marijuana - Drug Facts, ONDCP •DEA, DEA Briefs & Background, Drugs and Drug Abuse, Drug Descriptions, Marijuana •Frank Discussion: marijuana statistics, Frank Discussion: Canadian marijuana statistics and opinion poll results •Should Government Legalize and Tax Marijuana? Should Governments Legalize and Tax Marijuana? •Jiggins, John, Legislating morality: The war on Cannabis, Social Alternatives; Jul95, Vol. 14 Issue 3 •Booth, Martin. Cannabis: A History. New York/2003 •Gieringer, Dale, The forgotten Origins of Cannabis Prohibition in California. Contemporary drug problems 26, summer 1999, page 10, volume 26, issue 2 •Koch, Lewis Z., War Of Drugs Targets Tech, Interactive Week, 10787259, 2/5/2001, Vol. 8, Issue 5 •Claude Nolin, Pierre. Cannabis: Our Position for a Canadian Public Policy, Summary Report of the Senate Special Committee on Illegal Drugs. September, 2002 •The Real Costs of Prisons, The Real Cost of Prisons Weblog: 771,608 people arrested for marijuana in 2004 •Marijuana.com, Marijuana.com An Herb Garden of Knowledge