EEA (Enemy Expatriation Act) 13 replies

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Deus Oblivionis

Domini de Umbra

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12th August 2008

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#1 6 years ago

Article concerning the details

Different Article, same Act

Yes, it is true. Representative Dent of Pennsylvania has proposed a bill, The Enemy Expatriation Act, that will allow the government to strip you of your citizenship.

In response, Anonymous has called for a day of protest asking every US citizen to take action against this Act.

The EEA is even being compared to the Nazi Factions Nuremberg laws that allowed Hitler to strip German people of their citizenship based on race, religion, etc.

The worst part of this whole thing, is that it proves that America is moving towards a far right agenda that may lead to our becoming a second Nazi Germany.

Watch my friends, for you have lived to see the days where America falls. Where the nation becomes the monster it has fought for so long. Truly Nietzche was right:

"He who fights with monsters should look that he himself does not become a monster...when you gaze long into the Abyss...the Abyss also gazes into you."


Alucardsig2-1.jpg



Schofield VIP Member

om :A

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24th October 2007

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#2 6 years ago

I don't agree with that Nietzche quote on a national scaling, most allied nations fought the same enemies, and only America seems to be turning into the enemy we all fought. =p

Anyway I've seen it coming for a few years now, as have many. This site is kind of extreme, but you can't ignore the trends:

America 2011 is Germany 1939




Schofield VIP Member

om :A

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#3 6 years ago

I don't agree with that Nietzche quote on a national scaling, most allied nations fought the same enemies, and only America seems to be turning into the enemy we all fought. =p

Anyway I've seen it coming for a few years now, as have many. This site is kind of extreme, but you can't ignore the trends:

America 2011 is Germany 1939




Warborg

Revenge was here.

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2nd August 2002

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#4 6 years ago

I don't know why any American would not support this:

A new bill has been introduced in Congress that, if passed, would strip Americans of their citizenship for just supporting hostilities against the United States.

However, like the SOPA concept it would be abused greatly and used for control purposes.

So the end result is I don't support this bill.




Commissar MercZ

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#5 6 years ago

I've seen this making the rounds on the internet in the past few weeks- the problem however is the bill got pigeonholed during committee when it was first introduced back in October. It didn't even get to a vote on the floor like the detainment portions of the National Defense Authorization Act did.

The House Version (Dent) The Senate Version (Lieberman)

I like govtrack because it is, for the most part, updated with the progress of various bills, and much easier to use than the Thomas Service that Library of Congress provides.

I'm not really sure how this just started getting kicked around now, since it died off in October. I'm guessing someone wanted to get in on the attention from NDAA had and figured no one would read up on the bill itself on their own.

I also warn users of the two sites. American Thinker has been known to go sensationalist on some of these things before without adequately researching up on it. Just look at some of the hard-hitting journalism we see in some recent articles there- "Gingrich v. Leftism", "On the Intellectual Inferiority of Liberalism", "White Middle-Schooler Beaten Unconscious by Group of Black Students", and hard-hitting analysis of the radical subversion of the Department of the Interior and Obama's islamofascist buddies in Egypt in the form of the Muslim Brotherhood. The Digital Journal cites the ever lovable conspiracy nut 'FEMA Camps' Alex Jones for commentary. Even the video it has at the end is back from October- yet both American Thinker and the Digital Journal article say that the bill has just been introduced this month.

What is of concern though is why Dent and Lieberman even introduced them in the first place. Both houses of Congress get inundated with some weird legislation, many that don't get beyond committee either due to similar legislation (possibly the detainment protocols of NDAA going through at the time), too vague (this proposal was less than a page in both versions- how do you implement it?), or the risks of controversy outweighs the power of an interest group pushing for it or legal clusterfuck that could arise.




Emperor Benedictine

You can't fire me, I quit

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16th April 2005

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#6 6 years ago

Is this open seasons on the ideals of liberty lately or what? :Puzzled:

Warborg;5604157I don't know why any American would not support this:
A new bill has been introduced in Congress that, if passed, would strip Americans of their citizenship for just supporting hostilities against the United States.

I dunno, because of the concept of freedom of speech maybe?




Warborg

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#7 6 years ago
Emperor Benedictine;5604331Is this open seasons on the ideals of liberty lately or what? :Puzzled: I dunno, because of the concept of freedom of speech maybe?

I've always been a firm believer in this for America "Love it or leave it"

Now let's take it a step further. If someone(American) hates America enough to attempt to harm it or declare war on it...why on Earth should we still allow them to be a citizen?

Here's an example: Your living in a house with 5 people, One of them has tried to kill the rest and blow the house up. He has declared a hatred of the rest and the house. Is it really smart to leave this person in the house so he can try it again?




Emperor Benedictine

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#8 6 years ago

The quote didn't say anything about trying to harm America, just "supporting" attacks on America. Yes it's probably unwise to remain in a country you hate, but apparently Americans have a constitutional right to hold whatever opinions they want to anyway...




Commissar MercZ

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#9 6 years ago

Warborg;5604443I've always been a firm believer in this for America "Love it or leave it"

Now let's take it a step further. If someone(American) hates America enough to attempt to harm it or declare war on it...why on Earth should we still allow them to be a citizen?

Here's an example: Your living in a house with 5 people, One of them has tried to kill the rest and blow the house up. He has declared a hatred of the rest and the house. Is it really smart to leave this person in the house so he can try it again?

Here's my question- how would you determine who is 'patriotic' enough? How do you determine what cuts for being 'hateful' towards the country and what falls within the realms of free speech? Who gets to decide that? How do we make sure it doesn't get politicized when presidencies come and go? How does it prevent marginalization and suspicion towards naturalized citizens?

I don't really think this is a good line to pursue. It may sound good from the usual proclamations of feel-good patriotism (love it or hate it, as you said...), but it's a slippery slope when you begin trying to impose litmus tests on who are good citizens and who aren't.

I don't really think the US government needs any more power than it already has to combat against 'domestic' threats anyways.




Warborg

Revenge was here.

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#10 6 years ago

Commissar MercZ;5604602Here's my question- how would you determine who is 'patriotic' enough? How do you determine what cuts for being 'hateful' towards the country and what falls within the realms of free speech?[/QUOTE]

Free speech would be anything verbal. As I said... it goes beyond free speech when one would attempt to harm or declare war on America

Commissar MercZ;5604602 Who gets to decide that? How do we make sure it doesn't get politicized when presidencies come and go? How does it prevent marginalization and suspicion towards naturalized citizens? [/QUOTE]Good questions, see my last statement [QUOTE=Commissar MercZ;5604602] I don't really think this is a good line to pursue. It may sound good from the usual proclamations of feel-good patriotism (love it or hate it, as you said...), but it's a slippery slope when you begin trying to impose litmus tests on who are good citizens and who aren't.

While I like the phrase 'love it or leave it'. That's all it is...is a phrase. It has no power. At best it's a suggestion [QUOTE=Commissar MercZ;5604602] I don't really think the US government needs any more power than it already has to combat against 'domestic' threats anyways.

I agree, which is why in the end I would not support this bill. It it has too many holes in it for the Government to abuse. It would not take them long to go outside what it's intended purpose is.




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