Flashing lights to warn of Police 27 replies

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Warborg

Revenge was here.

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2nd August 2002

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#1 9 years ago

I heard this on the news as a guy is fighting a ticket he got for warning cars about police doing speed traps.

The police say he interfered in Police matters

He brought up a good point about it warns other cars to slow down while passing a police car(a law if lights are flashing...polite at other times).

I got to thinking... what is suppose to be the real reason for speeding tickets? It is for people to slow down and stop speeding. So, what is wrong with someone flashing their lights and the other cars slow down?

We know the true reason why the police gave him the ticket, because they could not give a speeder a ticket(MONEY).

I've always had a love/hate relationship with the police. This is one of the major hates I have with police. I think 90% of speeding tickets are wasteful and only serve to collect money.

Agree or disagree?




TodtheWraith

the exception

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3rd March 2008

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#2 9 years ago

Agree. Except for one thing.

Warborg;4952458I think 100% of speeding tickets are wasteful and only serve to collect money.

/Fixed




Nemmerle Forum Mod

Voice of joy and sunshine

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26th May 2003

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#3 9 years ago
Warborg;4952458I got to thinking... what is suppose to be the real reason for speeding tickets? It is for people to slow down and stop speeding. So, what is wrong with someone flashing their lights and the other cars slow down?

If you tell people where the police are they're just going to slow down on that one bit and speed up the minute they're out of sight again. By and large it's not speed that kills anyway, it's acceleration, people speeding up and slowing down in a hurry. Kinda like people seeing the police speed trap, flashing their lights and braking.




Warborg

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#4 9 years ago
Nemmerle;4952488If you tell people where the police are they're just going to slow down on that one bit and speed up the minute they're out of sight again.

True, but the police also use this method... like putting dummies in police cars and leaving the car on the side of the road. Police themselves even post in the paper where they are going to do radar sometimes.




Huffardo

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29th November 2003

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#5 9 years ago

What insane law gave the police the right to give that guy a ticket for making other people aware of the situation, unless he was disturbing the traffic?




Warborg

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#6 9 years ago

Better late then never, I found a link to the real story behind my post

Spoiler: Show

Drivers Warning About Police At Issue in Montgomery Case

Mark Zaid was driving to a baseball game recently when a driver coming in the opposite direction flashed his lights. It was a warning: Montgomery County police had set up an enforcement zone.

As a common courtesy, Zaid says, he flashed his lights back. A police officer saw it and issued him a $50 citation, telling Zaid that it was illegal in Maryland to flash headlights while driving and that he could actually be charged with something worse: "obstructing a police investigation."

That officer might have picked the wrong guy to ticket: Zaid, of the District, is a lawyer who represents government whistleblowers. He believes he did nothing wrong. "The more I thought about it, I realized I'm going to make an issue of this," he said.

Zaid appeared in Montgomery County District Court yesterday to fight the ticket. The officer who issued the citation, near Westlake Drive in Bethesda, did not appear -- he is on military leave, according to Montgomery police -- so the judge dismissed the ticket. Now Zaid is demanding an apology and says he will file a lawsuit if he doesn't get one.

Montgomery County police defended the citation, saying Zaid was violating a state law that prohibits driving with flashing lights.

Zaid isn't alone in his anger. The issue of whether motorists have a right to warn others about enforcement zones has been the subject of much debate across the United States and Canada, though there has been no definitive court ruling. In Franklin, Tenn., one man spent more than $1,000 to fight a $10 ticket.

David Rocah, an attorney with the American Civil Liberties Union of Maryland, agrees with Zaid. Rocah said the state's law "clearly refers" to flashing lights as an "adjective, not a verb." He said that means it is not legal to drive with a continuously flashing light on a vehicle, but flashing a light once to communicate with someone on the road is not a violation.

"There's no debate," Rocah said. "What [Zaid] did was not illegal."

Lt. Paul Starks, a Montgomery police spokesman, said the law does allow an officer to issue a ticket for warning drivers of an enforcement zone. "It's very general," he said.

Starks said the department does not have a policy on such tickets and the issue will be discussed.

Although opponents scoff at the enforcement zones as a way to raise revenue, Starks said the zones are set up when residents or business owners complain about a speeding problem. Moreover, he said that the number of tickets issued for flashing lights has been "insignificant compared to the number of tickets issued."

Zaid doesn't see it as insignificant. As a lawyer whose career has included representing government whistleblowers, suing a congressman for libel and tackling constitutional issues, he thinks he's found a case of the government overstepping its bounds.

"I like making the government jump through hoops, because they do it to everyone else," Zaid said of his work.

When the officer who ticketed Zaid didn't show up in court yesterday, the judge also dismissed all the other citations the officer issued at the enforcement zone.

"I knew it was bogus, ridiculous and no judge would uphold this," said Stephen Coyne, who received a ticket in the same area as Zaid.

Coyne, who was pulled over while driving home from church with his son, was also cited after he flashed his lights to thank a driver for warning him.

D.C. Man Fights Citation for Warning Other Drivers - washingtonpost.com




Huffardo

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#7 9 years ago

Good. Flashing your headlights is common practice not only for warning other drivers of speed controls, but also (and a lot more commonly so) to tell them if their headlights are not on and to warn for moose, reindeer and other large animals on or close to the road, making the practice illegal would be plain stupid.




Mihail VIP Member

President of Novistrana

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19th January 2003

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#8 9 years ago

It's to incur cost on locals to fund local townships and the states




[WOLF] Ionizer

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#9 9 years ago

To the "Flashing lights is illegal" part, I have to say that (in NJ, at least) as part of driver's ed, you are taught to flash your high beams at night if doing so will alert other drivers without blinding them (such as at stop signs where your vehicle may be obstructed by parked cars, approaching blind corners, etc). And that particular law is obviously geared towards continuously flashing lights that may be a distraction or that might be confused with police cruiser lights, not a single flash of high beams.




Rikupsoni

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#10 9 years ago

So it's fine to slow down for a moment and then always keep overspeed elsewhere? They're called speed traps for a reason.

I would never flash my lights because I do think speeding drivers deserve their penalty.

Overspeed has a huge difference to braking distance and concentration on other road users. We've seen enough especially young drivers take not only their own life, but their friends' lives as well by speeding. And not just staying at that, sure you like nice overspeed which makes it impossible to brake in time incase of an abrupt child crossing the street. Is that cool?

Seems like that's the attitude here as well. Although I'm probably younger than most of you, I can only say grow up with your youthful flamboyance and take some responsibility. :nodding: