Holocaust Rail Justice Act 18 replies

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#1 6 years ago
Germany's national railway, Deutsche Bahn, has hired a law firm and PR agency in the United States to prepare for legislation being considered by Congress that would allow Holocaust survivors to sue European railway companies for damages in American courts. Deutsche Bahn fears victims could sue for millions if the legislation passes.

US Holocaust Legislation: German National Railway Fears Flood of Lawsuits - SPIEGEL ONLINE - News - International

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Nemmerle Forum Mod

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#2 6 years ago

How odd. You wouldn't think DB would have anything that could be sued in America anyway.




Huffardo

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#3 6 years ago

So the US will invade Germany again to give money to holocaust survivors? Sounds legit.




Andron Taps Forum Mod

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#4 6 years ago

I think we're just about due for another visit.


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Octovon

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5th August 2003

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#5 6 years ago
Germany's national railway, Deutsche Bahn, has hired a law firm and PR agency in the United States to prepare for legislation being considered by Congress that would allow Holocaust survivors to sue European railway companies for damages in American courts. Deutsche Bahn fears victims could sue for millions if the legislation passes.

Is it only me who thinks this is stupid? Don't get me wrong, the Holocaust was bad (massive understatement) but suing a railway company 70+ years later just seems petty and even greedy. I feel that way about America's boner for suing people over random shit, but what is suing a company more than half a century later going to accomplish? Are Holocaust victims suddenly going to feel better and have peace of mind because they got some money from a railway company?




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#6 6 years ago

I agree, Octovon. I'm also quite certain that the railways had no choice but to comply. You can't sue infrastructure for war crimes, it's absurd.




MrFancypants Forum Admin

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#7 6 years ago

Strange. I think Germany signed a treaty with the US a couple of years ago which led to a "voluntary" fund of about 10 billion DMark for victims in exchange for the assurance that no German companies would be sued in the future.

Compensation is a delicate topic. Germany was good in avoiding compensation in a lot of cases, which makes survivors angry. On the other hand, the Allies were willing to turn a blind eye after WW2 due to Germany's importance for the Cold War, so many of the people who were actually responsible were never punished.




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#8 6 years ago

It is all quite messy. Everyone screwed up, and often repatriations are good, even necessary. But this is going overboard. Personally, I think we should just move on. Yes, it was bloody horrible. But the people in today's Germany, and its rail companies, had zero say in what happened then. It's punishing a child for their parent's actions.




wjlaslo

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#9 6 years ago

Wait...so Holocaust survivors, living (and presumably citizens of) the USA, are going to sue...a German national company...for acts committed in Germany...with an American court?

What?

Shouldn't this go to the International Court of Justice? The first article says that it's ridiculously difficult to sue other countries from outside of them, so I would almost think it would be less trouble that way. But what do I know about the Hague.

And I don't want to blame the victim here, I having nothing against them, let me make that clear - but wouldn't this have been easier to take care of 70 years ago, when the victims and the perpetrators were right there in Germany where it happened?




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#10 6 years ago

It definitely would have been easier. Unfortunately, everyone was being particularly bad about it, and neglected capturing a lot of the Nazi leaders, and then the Cold War happened.

What blows my mind is they want to sue the railway company. That's like suing, in California, Caltrans (road workers and such) for the interment of the Japanese because they made the roads to the camps, or motor companies because they made the vehicles that carried them. That's absurd.




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