IF we did find life | Out there 69 replies

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Kwould

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#61 10 years ago
Karst;4286167Bacteria aren't nearly all linked to diseases. The vast majority live "peacefully" in other organisms or the environment. Many are even crucial for the human metabolism. It seems highly unlikely that an alien bacterium would be capable of causing disease in humans considering it would never have adapted to such a role.

Of course not, and you are absolutely right. Only a small fraction of a percent of bacteria strains present on earth are harmful to humans. But theoretically, the possibility of a non-terrestrial micro-organism causing harm to any number of earth bound species is still there.




Mr. Matt VIP Member

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#62 10 years ago

Presumably, any intelligent alien lifeform would be as varied and diverse as the human race is, regardless of what form they took. Some people watch Star Trek too much - "all Klingons are violent," "all Vulcans are logical," "all Romulans are sneaky and suspicious," etc. Life ain't so clear-cut in reality. They would likely have different religions, different philosophies, different reactions, just like the human race does.

And why do people keep saying that the human race is 'primitive' or a 'child race'? To our present knowledge, the human race is the most advanced civilisation that has ever existed. Hardly primitive...

Anyway, given how hostile our own galaxy is, it's pretty unlikely that much life has survived long enough to evolve into anything intelligent. Humans have had a lot of near-misses already, and you only need to look back casually to see plenty of mass extinctions in our own history. It's doubtful we'll contact anything intelligent for a long time to come - they'd have to be as lucky as we are to survive long enough.




AlDaja

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#63 10 years ago
Mr. Matt;4289198Presumably, any intelligent alien lifeform would be as varied and diverse as the human race is, regardless of what form they took. Some people watch Star Trek too much - "all Klingons are violent," "all Vulcans are logical," "all Romulans are sneaky and suspicious," etc. Life ain't so clear-cut in reality. They would likely have different religions, different philosophies, different reactions, just like the human race does.

I’d imagine we’d have a lot in common, if we were to believe life is a reflection than perhaps there are species with similar histories or social inadequacies such as ours. However, I do think that life on Earth is unique, as cosmic/geological events through millennia have shaped evolution on this planet to where we are now.

And why do people keep saying that the human race is 'primitive' or a 'child race'? To our present knowledge, the human race is the most advanced civilisation that has ever existed. Hardly primitive...

We refer to ourselves as such as a humbling observation of who we are and what we aspire to be. But yeah, to our knowledge we are the most advanced species in the known galaxy, or shall I say our solar system. We can’t really make the claim of “galaxy” until we move further out. It is warming to know that we at least see the faults within ourselves and the majority of the planet strives to do better pulling the reluctant amongst us kicking and screaming.

Anyway, given how hostile our own galaxy is, it's pretty unlikely that much life has survived long enough to evolve into anything intelligent. Humans have had a lot of near-misses already, and you only need to look back casually to see plenty of mass extinctions in our own history.

This is where the Drake Equation comes into play. By happenstance, we have managed to survive potential catastrophic geological and/or cosmic events to become the dominant species on the planet. It is only now that we have survived long enough on the planet to witness another geological change: Climate. We just have the unique ability to be the first species on this planet to alter that change, and if we can’t we are intuitive enough to adapt. Through thousands of years of genetic manipulation our species has evolved to such, that we can live and thrive on every corner of the globe – only arachnids and virus have achieved such ability.

It's doubtful we'll contact anything intelligent for a long time to come - they'd have to be as lucky as we are to survive long enough.

Yup, space is big…and who’s to say that we aren’t the first species to make it this far. The Drake Equation also suggests that social/technological conflicts would eliminate many species from existence (which we ourselves are on the balance). Either we break through this conundrum or eliminate ourselves from the galactic community. Besides, we are on the edge or our galaxy, and astronomy has shown that all the good stuff further in. So, we are in the boondocks of galactic central point.:lookaround:




Mr. Pedantic

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#64 10 years ago
And why do people keep saying that the human race is 'primitive' or a 'child race'? To our present knowledge, the human race is the most advanced civilisation that has ever existed. Hardly primitive...

The fact that we are the the most advanced civilization that we know about is hardly an achievement. The same is true for a bacterium (if it could think).

It's doubtful we'll contact anything intelligent for a long time to come - they'd have to be as lucky as we are to survive long enough.

The galaxy is a big place.




Darth Taxi

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#65 10 years ago

If we find anything intelligent let's learn as much as we can about them loot all their knowledge and destroy them. Other life could only bring another fragmented factions to world and that would be a nuisance. Hostile policy might help us to unite a little.




Mr. Matt VIP Member

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#66 10 years ago
AlDaja;4289223This is where the Drake Equation comes into play.[/quote] The Drake Equation is a numbers game, highly speculative and with no actual basis in reality. I wish people would stop quoting it. It was a thought experiment, an attempt to calculate the odds. That's not to say that life can't exist anywhere, but the Drake Equation is neither evidence of such nor should it be used in that way. Nothing is certain. [quote=Archmage Cleps;4289304]The fact that we are the the most advanced civilization that we know about is hardly an achievement. The same is true for a bacterium (if it could think).

Bacteria don't have civilisation in any way, shape or form, so I haven't a clue what you're going on about there. And yes, it's a massive achievement. How many other species do you know of that have developed what we've developed? The simple fact of the matter is, until something else does come along then we're the most advanced species in the known universe.

The galaxy is a big place.

The galaxy is about 100,000 lightyears in diameter. Some of the dangerous cosmic phenomenon around are quite comparable in size. To say nothing of the fact that any planet in any solar system is going to be subject to the same, or possibly worse (given Jupiter's unique role in our solar system) extinction-triggering events such as comet and meteor impacts. And then you have the fact that vast swathes of the galaxy lie within radiation belts, precluding any form of life developing there and also hindering any future interstellar exploration we might want to undertake ourselves. Worse still, a lot of the stars out there are little more than enormous gamma radiation flares... It's a big, dangerous galaxy. We're in a highly fortunate position here. And we've had a few near misses in our own, fairly short, period of existence.




Mr. Pedantic

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#67 10 years ago
The galaxy is about 100,000 lightyears in diameter. Some of the dangerous cosmic phenomenon around are quite comparable in size. To say nothing of the fact that any planet in any solar system is going to be subject to the same, or possibly worse (given Jupiter's unique role in our solar system) extinction-triggering events such as comet and meteor impacts. And then you have the fact that vast swathes of the galaxy lie within radiation belts, precluding any form of life developing there and also hindering any future interstellar exploration we might want to undertake ourselves. Worse still, a lot of the stars out there are little more than enormous gamma radiation flares...

I'm aware of that. At the same time, however, there are vast portions of the galaxy with stars like ours or smaller, suited to life. And there are many more galaxies out there. Ours isn't the only one.




AlDaja

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#68 10 years ago
Mr. Matt;4289362The Drake Equation is a numbers game, highly speculative and with no actual basis in reality.

Well the scientific community would disagree with you. It is a numbers game, but one that currently fits theoritical models.

It's a big, dangerous galaxy. We're in a highly fortunate position here. And we've had a few near misses in our own, fairly short, period of existence.

Ok...but if we've made it, logic would suggest others have. I will not accept that we are the only ones in the galaxy that have achieved advancement as we know it thus far. Yes the universe is a vast power of destruction and creation, but somewhere in the middle of it life takes hold. Our planet has been abused by cosmic events numerous times and the biosphere destroyed according to paleological accounts on several occasions, but our planet recovered and life continued. We can't assume that just because we have yet to encounter ET or heard from them that we are alone. It is safe to assume that: A. We represent the pinnacle of organized intelligent life (god help us if we are, as we represent a poor example) and the reason we have yet to encounter or observe life is because we are the only ones that possess the ability to do so. B: Other on equal or greater civilizations exist but because of the vastness of space and laws of pysics, communication is near to impossible or impractical, in which case we could have neighbors and not knowing of the other; or they are aware of us, but much as we imagine choose to ignore/observe our species until such time we reach a point in our social evolution that warrents "first contact" or we "bump" into each other in space and contact is forced (hopefully in peaceful contact). or C: The improbability that we truly are the last, a planet caught in an oasis of safety by happenstance, our relative safety assured by the two great bodies that deflect the majority of obstacles out of our path (Jupiter and our Sun). If this were ever to be true, then shame on us. A planet occupied by a bunch of fearful uncertain humanoids bent on squabbling over religious and political trivialities, while holding hostage our little world with the threat of nuclear annihilation. Edit: Kuddos to Darth Taxi. You've mentioned a quality we humans share, regardless of what our differences may be - that cataclysmic events seem to unite us and bring out the best qualities of what it means to be human...that alone may be what saves us in the end.




Nemmerle Forum Mod

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#69 10 years ago
AlDaja;4289551Well the scientific community would disagree with you. It is a numbers game, but one that currently fits theoritical models.

You can flip coins all your life and always get head, it's unlikely but it's possible.

Asides from which there's not enough data to plug into it to produce any really interesting results.

[INDENT]'And let's say that a certain percentage of these planets eventually produce a technological civilisation' Insert mostly random number. [/INDENT]

Equations are useless if you don't have the stuff to plug into them and we don't.




Mr. Pedantic

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#70 10 years ago

The Drake Equation is speculation, nothing else. But for want of anything better, it is the best we have.

If we find anything intelligent let's learn as much as we can about them loot all their knowledge and destroy them. Other life could only bring another fragmented factions to world and that would be a nuisance. Hostile policy might help us to unite a little.

Surely if we have anything to learn from such beings they would at the very least give us a run for our money in any war for survival, if not absolutely thrash us.