Illinois bans smoking in public places 46 replies

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26th June 2000

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#1 12 years ago

CHICAGO - Illinois smokers are in for a cold winter. Gov. Rod Blagojevich signed legislation Monday making Illinois the latest state to ban smoking in public places — including bars, restaurants and work places. The law goes into effect Jan. 1.

Chicago and dozens of other communities already restrict smoking, but the new law trumps local ordinances that are weaker or that exempt businesses with air filtration systems, state health officials said.

Smokers will still be allowed to light up in their homes, cars, at retail tobacco shops, in certain motel rooms and outdoors. If they get caught smoking in a public place off limits under the new law, though, they could be fined up to $250, and the business could get a $2,500 fine.

"This law will save lives," said Blagojevich, who signed the measure at Chicago's Northwestern Memorial Hospital. Supporters have highlighted the health dangers of tobacco and second-hand smoke in pushing for the ban.

Bar owners and smokers weren't so pleased.

"I feel like it's the Nazi regime coming in here, talking away all of our rights, said Tim Main, as he cleaned up Mike's Ten-Pin Lounge in Alton. "First they make it so you have to wear seat belts, and now they want to put a stop to smoking. What's next?"

Chicago carpenter Rob Nelson saw a chilly future. "It looks like I'll be spending a lot of time outside," he said.

We understand that smoking is a health risk, but why don't you let the businesses decide for themselves whether or not to allow smoking in their friggin private property. Thank you government for sticking your nose where it shouldn't belong and telling us what's good for us




colonel_bob

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4th June 2004

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#2 12 years ago
Jeffro;3815844Why can't the businesses decide whether or not to allow smoking in their establishment instead of the government deciding it for themselves?

Because there will always be the people that can't stand to see someone doing something they don't like, and will whine to the government. I don't think its the government's place to tell private businesses (like bars and restaurants, especially) whether they should or should not allow patrons to smoke on their premises.




General Rommel

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25th October 2004

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#3 12 years ago

I think this is good, people can die from second hand smoke just as easily as people smoking the cigarette. Plus, smoke smells really bad.




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#4 12 years ago

Talk of this has been around for a while in Chicago. I say let the smokers decide if they want to die from lung cancer or not.




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#5 12 years ago

For a truly public building, where absolutely anyone can go there such as Civic Centers, City Halls, Libraries and such places smoking should be banned but if it is a private business it should be up to them if they want to ban smoking in their bar or restaurant or whatever, not the government.




masked_marsoe VIP Member

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16th April 2005

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#6 12 years ago

This has been around many countries for years - (just the English-speaking ones listed) New Zealand, Ireland, Britain, Canada, Australia (except NT). Wikipedia lists 49 countries with smoking bans (at national or state level).

This is not about a person's right to smoke. It's about people's right to be smoke free if they wish. In a bar or a restaurant, even with a designated smokefree room, its almost impossible to avoid the smoke, as it lingers.

There is even a new word for what the smokers get up to here - smirting. Any guesses?




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#7 12 years ago
masked_marsoe;3816130It's about people's right to be smoke free if they wish.

They can be, by not going to restaurants that allow smokers.




masked_marsoe VIP Member

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#8 12 years ago

In the pubs here, every one of them allowed it. I think that there were less than a handful in the entire country that were completely smokefree. Since the law went into force, pubs have seen a 30% increase in revenue.

And its really pleasant. I didn't go into many pubs before the bill, but enough to know the feel of them. Now they are clean (have you ever cleaned a smokers house? Try mopping the ceiling), and they are enjoyable. And you can go into any one in the country and know that it'll have these same health standards.




MrFancypants Forum Admin

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#9 12 years ago

I don't see a problem with banning smoking in public places. There are even some good arguments against allowing smoking in private places: people may have the right to smoke themselves to death, but I don't think they should have a right to burden potentially existing social security systems with the consequences of their addictions. Treating someone with lung-cancer isn't exactly cheap. But I guess additional taxes can cover this problem.




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#10 12 years ago

masked_marsoe;3816153In the pubs here, every one of them allowed it. I think that there were less than a handful in the entire country that were completely smokefree. Since the law went into force, pubs have seen a 30% increase in revenue.

And its really pleasant. I didn't go into many pubs before the bill, but enough to know the feel of them. Now they are clean (have you ever cleaned a smokers house? Try mopping the ceiling), and they are enjoyable. And you can go into any one in the country and know that it'll have these same health standards.[/quote]It is still an invasion of the rights of the private establishments. It should be THEIR choice, not the government's. I bet knowing that there has been an actual increase in revenue by catering to a smoke free group will show the proprietors of those establishments that maybe they should have smoke free bars anyways. Or they can just as easily create an effective smoke free section by placing ventilation fans in the smoking section. Simply setting the smokers and non-smokers apart does nothing, proper ventilation does as it actively pulls smoke out of the room.

[quote=MrFancypants;3816172]I don't see a problem with banning smoking in public places. There are even some good arguments against allowing smoking in private places: people may have the right to smoke themselves to death, but I don't think they should have a right to burden potentially existing social security systems with the consequences of their addictions. Treating someone with lung-cancer isn't exactly cheap. But I guess additional taxes can cover this problem.

Or you cut smokers out of the system(or get rid of the system entirly, but that is a whole other topic)