Kim Jong-Il is Dead 23 replies

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RadioactiveLobster Forum Admin

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#1 6 years ago

Kim Jong Il, North Korea's mercurial and enigmatic leader, has died. He was 69.

Kim's death was announced Monday by state television from the North Korean capital, Pyongyang.

Kim is believed to have suffered a stroke in 2008 but appeared relatively vigorous in photos and video from recent trips to China and Russia and in numerous trips around the country carefully documented by state media.

The leader, reputed to have had a taste for cigars, cognac and gourmet cuisine, was believed to have had diabetes and heart disease.

The news came as North Korea prepared for a hereditary succession. Kim Jong Il inherited power after his father, revered North Korean founder Kim Il Sung, died in 1994.

In September 2010, Kim Jong Il unveiled his third son, the twenty-something Kim Jong Un, as his successor, putting him in high-ranking posts.

Source: Fox News

I say good riddance


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Fortune

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19th February 2005

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#2 6 years ago

It's always sad when God takes his children during the holidays, I frequently quote the poet Aesc- loljk.

Hopefully his son has even more fascinating eccentricities with at least less than half the dangerous quirks that his father had.

Have fun in hell bro!




redgroupclan

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#3 6 years ago

I stop checking the news for one hour and suddenly the entire Internet blows up about the worlds craziest dictator dying...




CKY2K

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#4 6 years ago

I just heard and for some reason the first thing I did was come here! LoL

Anyway, I'm glad he's out of power. Funny how some people have no problem with living lavish lives at the expense of millions of others...




Commissar MercZ

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#5 6 years ago

S.T.A.L.K.E.R.;5594572

I say good riddance

Indeed. Hopefully he'll be keeping a spot for the rest of the warmongers still out there. Be it our 'axis of evil' or certain figures within developed nations. I'm sure a lot of people will be wishing George W. Bush or Obama 'good riddance' (among others) after the mess in Iraq and Afghanistan to the locals when they kick the bucket.

But I don't think anyone had the 'theme song' he did to overcompensate for his shortcomings.

Not sure how long we'll have to wait for the rest of NK to crumble. Country's pretty much run by the military anyways, with or without a 'dominating' Kim. Arguably Kim Il-Sung was more of a 'involved' leader than Kim Jong-Il, but I wonder whose 'mourning' will out do the other. Where will he fit in? His father is already 'Eternal President', I guess he'll be "Eternal President" in a different font.




Fortune

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#6 6 years ago
Commissar MercZ;5594604

You know it's kind of a fascinating insight into the place, and even more-so into the human character.

Anywhere else, Kim Jong Il probably would has been an apparently uninteresting, Blockbuster employee with a creepy fetish and an on and off, unattractive girlfriend. Yet somehow in this country, by some strange fate; this guy who I wouldn't even put in a position to be an effective mailman, is somehow seen and worshiped as the epitome of what a man can possibly be in North Korea.

It brings me the same warm feeling in my stomach when I see a fat guy with a hot girlfriend; the subtle illusion that I could obviously do 10x better if I wanted, I'm just passing it off till later so the biography they make about my life will be more dramatic for the first hour.




Commissar MercZ

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#7 6 years ago
Fortune;5594621You know it's kind of a fascinating insight into the place, and even more-so into the human character.

It also says alot when you see how they reacted to the death of Kim Il-Sung:

That's one of three parts of the same video. It gets pretty crazy at some parts, even it was staged/encouraged for cameras.

With regards to the rest of your post, that is true. Elsewhere Kim Jong-Il would have been an unremarkable person. But we have many countries with political and/or corporate families which essentially involve being born in the right place- regardless if the place is a technically a monarchy or run on nobility or not. Though again Kim Jong-Il was only one part of a power structure in North Korea- the military (as a whole institution) is essentially what will run (and has run) North Korea for all this time. Kim Jong-Il was necessary to continue the 'legacy' of Kim Il-Sung that was set up both with his propaganda and what 'achievements' could be attributed to him. Same thing will be seen with the kid currently- media has been particularity interested in his own children. His eldest, Kim Jong-nam, pretty much lost his chance at any power when he was busted as seen being eccentric, namely when he tried to go to Japan with a fake identity to go to Disneyland in Tokyo, passing it to Kim Jong-un who we now know currently. We got some pictures from him when he was attending private schools/academies in Europe that ended up in the hands of the media.




emonkies

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#8 6 years ago

Same thing, when I heard he died I came here.

It depends how the military responds. The son was raised in the west so he is more "westernized" but will the military allow him more leeway?




Commissar MercZ

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#9 6 years ago

Anlushac11;5594625Same thing, when I heard he died I came here.

It depends how the military responds. The son was raised in the west so he is more "westernized" but will the military allow him more leeway?

The son is definitely more exposed to 'western' ideas like you say, though again it also depends on what degree his position in the North Korea hierarchy gives him. As I said it's arguable that the transition from Kim Il-Sung to Kim Jong-Il saw the military command assume more power.

Plus, with Juche enshrined as much as it is (superseding the original 'Marxist-Leninst' line back in the 70s) and it's espousal of Songun, the military will retain powerful force. Both in the practical sense, with the military being the greatest beneficiary of the economy and in the psychological sense, with the policy designating the soldiers and what not within the military as the 'revolutionary' force in North Korea (and therefore the very backbone), rather than the traditional Marxist-Leninist focus on industrial and agrarian workers.

However the fact that really no one knows what's going to happen in the end or the positions of those that will create the new power structure is precisely why Asian markets actually dipped upon this news being broken. They're not sure what that means for progressions on the continent, especially with the recent flareups in the past few years.

Edit: Plus, with Qaddafi AND Kim Jong-Il meeting their demise, some of the most popular psychotic dictators to make fun of are gone. We're running out of the screwballs... (and yes I'm aware of the people suffering/ed under them, I'm not trivializing that)




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Misanthrope

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#10 6 years ago

I didn't even know Kim Jong was il!

:giggle: