Liberal Massachusetts fires a warning shot at the White House 36 replies

Please wait...

AlDaja

SFC III Troubleshooter.

50 XP

5th September 2006

0 Uploads

11,263 Posts

0 Threads

#1 11 years ago
Spoiler: Show

BOSTON (AP) - In an epic upset in liberal Massachusetts, Republican Scott Brown rode a wave of voter anger to win the U.S. Senate seat held by the late Edward M. Kennedy for nearly half a century, leaving President Barack Obama's health care overhaul in doubt and marring the end of his first year in office. adlabel_horz.gif Addressing an exuberant victory celebration Tuesday night, Brown declared he was "ready to go to Washington without delay" as the crowd chanted, "Seat him now." Democrats indicated they would, deflating a budding controversy over whether they would try to block Brown long enough to complete congressional passage of the health care plan he has promised to oppose.

"The people of Massachusetts have spoken. We welcome Scott Brown to the Senate and will move to seat him as soon as the proper paperwork has been received," said Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev. Massachusetts Secretary of State William Galvin said he would notify the Senate on Wednesday that Brown had been elected.

The loss by the once-favored Democrat Martha Coakley in the Democratic stronghold was a stunning embarrassment for the White House after Obama rushed to Boston on Sunday to try to save the foundering candidate. Her defeat on Tuesday signaled big political problems for the president's party this fall when House, Senate and gubernatorial candidates are on the ballot nationwide.

Brown's victory was the third major loss for Democrats in statewide elections since Obama became president. Republicans won governors' seats in Virginia and New Jersey in November.

"I have no interest in sugarcoating what happened in Massachusetts," said Sen. Robert Menendez, the head of the Senate Democrats' campaign committee. "There is a lot of anxiety in the country right now. Americans are understandably impatient."

Brown will become the 41st Republican in the 100-member Senate, which could allow the GOP to block the president's health care legislation. Democrats needed Coakley to win for a 60th vote to thwart Republican filibusters. The trouble may go deeper: Democratic lawmakers could read the results as a vote against Obama's broader agenda, weakening their support for the president. The results could scare some Democrats from seeking office this fall.

The Republican will finish Kennedy's unexpired term, facing re-election in 2012. Brown led by 52 per cent to 47 percent with all but 3 percent of precincts counted. Turnout was exceptional for a special election in January, with light snow reported in parts of the state. More voters showed up at the polls Tuesday than in any non-presidential general election in Massachusetts since 1990.

One day shy of the first anniversary of Obama's swearing-in, the election played out amid a backdrop of animosity and resentment from voters over persistently high unemployment, Wall Street bailouts, exploding federal budget deficits and partisan wrangling over health care.

"I voted for Obama because I wanted change. ... I thought he'd bring it to us, but I just don't like the direction that he's heading," said John Triolo, 38, a registered independent who voted in Fitchburg. He said his frustrations, including what he considered the too-quick pace of health care legislation, led him to vote for Brown.

For weeks considered a long shot, Brown seized on voter discontent to overtake Coakley in the campaign's final stretch. His candidacy energized Republicans, including backers of the "tea party" protest movement, while attracting disappointed Democrats and independents uneasy with where they felt the nation was heading.

A cornerstone of Brown's campaign was his promise to vote against the health care plan.

Though the president wasn't on the ballot, he was on many voters' minds. Coakley called Brown conceding the race, and Obama talked to both Brown and Coakley, congratulating them on the race.

The Democrat said the president told her: "We can't win them all." Brown will be the first Republican senator from Massachusetts in 30 years. Even before the first results were announced, administration officials were privately accusing Coakley of a poorly run campaign and playing down the notion that Obama or a toxic political landscape had much to do with the outcome.

Coakley's supporters, in turn, blamed that very environment, saying her lead dropped significantly after the Senate passed health care reform shortly before Christmas and after the Christmas Day attempted airliner bombing that Obama himself said showed a failure of his administration.

Days before the polls closed, Democrats were fingerpointing and laying blame. Rep. Chris Van Hollen of Maryland, head of the House Democrats' campaign effort, said Coakley's loss won't deter his colleagues from continuing to blame the previous administration.

"President George W. Bush and House Republicans drove our economy into a ditch and tried to run away from the accident," he said. "President Obama and congressional Democrats have been focused repairing the damage to our economy."

At Boston's Park Plaza Hotel, giddy Republicans cheered, chanted "USA" and waved the "tea party" version of the American flag.

Even before Brown won, the grass-roots network fueled by antiestablishment frustrations, sought credit for the victory, much like the liberal MoveOn.org did in the 2006 midterm elections when Democrats rose to power.

GOP chairman Michael Steele said Brown's "message of lower taxes, smaller government and fiscal responsibility clearly resonated with independent-minded voters in Massachusetts who were looking for a solution to decades of failed Democrat leadership."

Wall Street watched the election closely. The Dow Jones industrial average rose 116 points, and analysts attributed the increase to hopes the election would make it harder for Obama to make his changes to health care. That eased investor concerns that profits at companies such as insurers and drug makers would suffer.

Across Massachusetts, voters who had been bombarded with phone calls and dizzied with nonstop campaign commercials for Coakley and Brown gave a fitting turnout despite intermittent snow and rain statewide.

Galvin, who discounted sporadic reports of voter irregularities throughout the day, predicted turnout ranging from 1.6 million to 2.2 million, 40 percent to 55 percent of registered voters. The Dec. 8 primary had a scant turnout of about 20 percent. Voters considered national issues including health care and the federal budget deficits.

Fears about spending drove Karla Bunch, 49, to vote for Brown. "It's time for the country, for the taxpayers, to take back their money," she said. And Elizabeth Reddin, 65, voted for Brown because she said she was turned off by the Democrat's negative advertisements, saying: "The Coakley stuff was disgusting." (Copyright Associated Press, All Rights Reserved)

An interesting turn of events, never would have expected it from Massachusetts - a state that traditionally votes very left leaning candidates into public office. As I noted already in another thread, this puts the Democrats in a pickle over the health care issue and a further warning not to impede the new Senator to his seat in order to push through an unpopular bill. The plus side personally...my stocks did well, an apparent sigh of relief that rippled through Wall Street, well, we will see.




EO Violation

If you ain't Cav, you ain't...

50 XP

5th October 2007

0 Uploads

2,108 Posts

0 Threads

#2 11 years ago

Made my day.




Admiral Donutz Advanced Member

Wanna go Double Dutch?

735,271 XP

9th December 2003

0 Uploads

71,460 Posts

0 Threads

#3 11 years ago

The thread title sounds a bit funny, as I fail to see how this is a "warning" to the white house. The democrat simply sucked judging from what The Dailyshow showed so yeah.. With an other candidate and/or better campaign they may very well have kept their senator seat.




Zipacna Advanced Member

Re-heally?

44,378 XP

10th January 2008

0 Uploads

4,283 Posts

59 Threads

#4 11 years ago

I concur. From all I have heard about the issue, it seems the Democratic candidate was somewhat sniffy and dismissive. I would not interpret too much into that. (Oh, and I must say... I really had to laugh a lot about the Daily Show on Monday. =p )


sigpic191442_14.gif



AlDaja

SFC III Troubleshooter.

50 XP

5th September 2006

0 Uploads

11,263 Posts

0 Threads

#5 11 years ago

Whu? NO...What the f'ck does this have to do with some show on Comedy Central? This is about Americans telling the White House NO on Health care and the direction the country is going. Holly sh't...you guys really need to pay more attention.




Admiral Donutz Advanced Member

Wanna go Double Dutch?

735,271 XP

9th December 2003

0 Uploads

71,460 Posts

0 Threads

#6 11 years ago

I thought it was about electing the most competent runner with the "best" plan or vision to represent the state of Massachusetts? :uhm:




AlDaja

SFC III Troubleshooter.

50 XP

5th September 2006

0 Uploads

11,263 Posts

0 Threads

#7 11 years ago
Admiral Donutz;5216097I thought it was about electing the most competent runner with the "best" plan or vision to represent the state of Massachusetts? :uhm:

Ah...yeah, but not in the typical fashion. Watch sound bites from voters MSNBC, FOX and CNN have some on their sites. Massachusetts is very liberal (almost 87%) of the voters, and much like many of our members melt when they come in contact with a conservative. Their main drive is to tell their guy, that hey...you are not doing what you promised, and the last thing our state needs is more expense and a health system that has gone way, way off track from its original agreed upon charter.




RadioactiveLobster Site Administrator

Jeff is a missing boss

567,832 XP

28th July 2002

0 Uploads

53,251 Posts

1,339 Threads

#8 11 years ago

It is sad that a lot of people use "The Daily Show" as a base to get their political news. It's a COMEDY SHOW


If there is no image, Mikey broke something...



AlDaja

SFC III Troubleshooter.

50 XP

5th September 2006

0 Uploads

11,263 Posts

0 Threads

#9 11 years ago
S.T.A.L.K.E.R.;5216109It is sad that a lot of people use "The Daily Show" as a base to get their political news. It's a COMEDY SHOW

Years ago, I would hear people use this show as a basis to argue with me and I had no idea what they were referencing, cause I don't watch much TV...then I found out it was on Comedy Central and lol.




Admiral Donutz Advanced Member

Wanna go Double Dutch?

735,271 XP

9th December 2003

0 Uploads

71,460 Posts

0 Threads

#10 11 years ago
S.T.A.L.K.E.R.;5216109It is sad that a lot of people use "The Daily Show" as a base to get their political news. It's a COMEDY SHOW

Or perhaps it just happens to be the only place this was mentioned rsther then intending to use it as a news source?

Lets put it this way, if I hadn't seen TDS I wouldn't have known about this at all as it's not significant foreign news, it's not going to make internationa headlines. Though I just checked an Dutch online news site and it briefly mentions the events (seat goes to Republican X, used to be late the seat of democratic senator Kennedy, blablabla, now senate has X democratic seats blablabla"). If I really wished felt like knowing all about these elections rather then a minute of camera footage where the democrat is portrayed in a way that makes you go "Lol, oh dear... hehe" I would. But honestly, I don't care that much. Seat went from Dem to Rep... that's all I need to know.

Incase I actively wish to inquire about politcla events I watch the news, read the newspaper, perhaps google around a bit incase it concenrs foreign events that aren't major news and so on.

If you happen to hear mentioning of some Dutch politcal news on some show,what's so bad about that? It may draw your interest and lead you to look up some news source to learn more about the event... if anything it can tribute to increasing politcal interest.