Move to ban Turkey's ruling party for anti-secularism 6 replies

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masked_marsoe VIP Member

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16th April 2005

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#1 10 years ago

Al Jazeera English - News - Move To Ban Turkey's Ruling Party

Abdurrahman Yalcinkaya, the court of appeals chief prosecutor, as quoted by Turkish television as saying he wanted senior party members, including the president and prime minister, banned from politics for five years...

The AK Party has been locked in a battle with Turkey's secularist establishment, including judges and army generals, since it first came to power in 2002...

The party received more than 46 per cent of the vote in the general election last July...

The constitutional court has previously banned several political parties, including the Welfare Party of Necmettin Erbakan, Turkey's first Islamist prime minister and mentor of Recep Tayyip Erdogan, the current premier.

I find it pretty incredible, especially as it is coming from a top state prosecutor. Normally such calls would come from a small, little-known opposition group.

It will certainly be interesting to see how this pans out. The pressure on the party may either consolidate support, or erode it drastically.




GuineaPig

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#2 10 years ago

Wow. Talk about a judge not sucking up to the government. Never thought I'd find myself admiring the Turkish judicial system. That's quite impressive; and goddamn brave.




Red Menace

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#3 10 years ago

The Kemalist ideology is founded in a secular nation-state. Kemalists obviously view the election of an anti-secularist party as a threat to Kemalism and will do anything in their power to stop what they see as subversion of that ideology. I agree that it should be something interesting to watch.


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#4 10 years ago

Why are head scarves banned in Universities? It seems to me lifting said ban is the appropriate thing to do, or did Freedom of Religion die?




masked_marsoe VIP Member

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#5 10 years ago
Afterburner;4261294Why are head scarves banned in Universities? It seems to me lifting said ban is the appropriate thing to do, or did Freedom of Religion die?

It's the issue over overt religious symbols.

Allowing overt religious symbols in state institutions is seen as religion and state getting too close. France had the same argument over overt religious symbols is public schools a few years ago.




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#6 10 years ago

masked_marsoe;4261304It's the issue over overt religious symbols.

Allowing overt religious symbols in state institutions is seen as religion and state getting too close. France had the same argument over overt religious symbols is public schools a few years ago.

A person's body is private property, and they have a right to wear those religious symbols absolutely anywhere they please. As long as all religious symbols are allowed to be worn, and they are neither encouraged or required than it is fine. In fact I dare say it is a human rights violation.

It's not about religion and state being "close" it is about the state mandating about religion, which is exactly what banning that headscarf is doing. The state should not mandate on ANYTHING religious unless it explicitly is harming someone else's freedom.

Now unless someone can point me to the "Freedom to not look at a piece of clothing," included in some bill of rights somewhere, I'm going to have to call this a gross overstepping of governmental bounds, and a violation of human rights.




masked_marsoe VIP Member

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#7 10 years ago

Afterburner;4261310A person's body is private property, and they have a right to wear those religious symbols absolutely anywhere they please. As long as all religious symbols are allowed to be worn, and they are neither encouraged or required than it is fine. In fact I dare say it is a human rights violation.

It's not about religion and state being "close" it is about the state mandating about religion, which is exactly what banning that headscarf is doing. The state should not mandate on ANYTHING religious unless it explicitly is harming someone else's freedom.

Now unless someone can point me to the "Freedom to not look at a piece of clothing," included in some bill of rights somewhere, I'm going to have to call this a gross overstepping of governmental bounds, and a violation of human rights.[/quote]The initial ban came in 1997, it was partially overturned 3 weeks ago:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/europe/7259694.stmA strict headscarf ban had been in force in Turkish universities since 1997. The ban came after the staunchly secularist military exerted pressure to oust a government it saw as too Islamist.

The changes state that only traditional scarves will be permitted in universities, tied loosely under the chin.

Headscarves that cover the neck are still banned, as is the chador and the all-enveloping burka. [/QUOTE]

[QUOTE=Afterburner]In fact I dare say it is a human rights violation.

It's not recognised as such (though I agree with you), and cases have been brought before both the Supreme Court in Turkey, and the EU's Court of Human Rights.

[QUOTE=http://www.turkishdailynews.com.tr/archives.php?id=37737]The Turkish military believes that Islamic fundamentalism is one of Turkey's greatest national security threats and feels that "if we are not careful about political Islam, it will lead Turkey to a new Dark Age." A fiercely secularist establishment led by the military has drawn criticism from human rights groups about the means of opposing the rising influence of Islamic fundamentalism.