Police 8 replies

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Antilles VIP Member

The Imaginative

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17th July 2006

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#1 6 years ago

For the Life of my, cant really think of anything else for a title.

Anyways

file.php?id=10632&t=1

So, this photo has brought up much debate on a local forum as of late. It brought up alot of questions as to what the officer was doing. There were people on the side that officer was being lazy and just getting some Timmy's. While others saying they were probably just doing their job and it was the closest available spot close to the entrance.

Also been alot of talk about police in general. How people seem to think they can do whatever they want, what not.

Hell, one person even said this.

just another nut with a gun breaking the law, time to get rid of this armed gang.

Castanet • Cop being lazy? What do you think of this? - View topic ^link

Spoiler: Show

So, it turns out the officer was responding to a shoplifting call, in which someone had stolen from several stores. So the officer was doing her job. While she could have parked in the lane that runs outside the doors, its barely wide enough for 2 vehicles as is, and would have blocked the road. I know for a fact, because of how busy this entrance is, it is hard to get a spot close to the door, as it is quite busy. While the Handicap spots are almost always empty.

Because of the picture, the Police are actually investigating this, as to what happened, what not.

Finally, the RCMP in this area are actually the busiest in Canada per Capita because our detachment is severely shorthanded. A recent survey done by StatsCan said to properly police the area, we need another 40 officers. The city gave them 9.

^What happened and some details on local cops for insight.

Anyways, this is basically me offering the police up to debate, and offering this story as a launch point, because in reality this is a non-issue event, but gives a good start to talk. DEBATE! :P


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Schofield VIP Member

om :A

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#2 6 years ago

I've seen so MANY people do that before, it's not just cops. I'm even guilty of it if I'm going to Tim's for like 5 seconds.

People want this to be a cop abusing power so they can go off into their little rebellious/anarchy circle jerk.

Edit: I'd like to say I have only ever parked in a handicapped spot once and it was when the parking lot was absolutely full.




Crazy Wolf VIP Member

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#3 6 years ago

Cops need to be nearly perfect, to instill trust and faith in the government and its laws. If the lights were kept on, then the picture wouldn't have aroused as much suspicion. I still think perhaps that loading zone would have been a better choice when it comes to how people perceive it. I mean, parking in a handicapped space tends to be viewed as roughly equal in dickery as parking in a fire lane (opinions vary on whether it's better or worse), but loading zones don't arouse as much ire.




Rikupsoni

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26th April 2004

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#4 6 years ago

I have great respect for the police in my country, I've rarely seen any errors or abuse by the police. Indeed, I remember reading in some article that the citizens of Finland trust the police most in Europe.

It just might be stereotypes got from the media, but the American police force just seems to come from another planet. Just today I read that some police officer had tazered a 14-year-old girl in the crotch because she "resisted arrest" while in reality she did not as everybody could see from the video. I've read about cases where people became paralyzed as police stormed to arrest him, and he wasn't actually even the guy they were looking for.

So I'd say there are quite many sadists in the police like in the military too than compared with rest of profesions. Some people just want this job because they can use force and authority. This combined with the large number of cops in the USA, there are a lot of uneducated people too. They like to use a lot for force when making arrests. I even remember watching a Vietnam War era documentary where US police officers boasted about smacking student protestors with batons and seemed to be annoyed at university people coming from "richer families". That pretty much sums the problem.

But I'd also point out that the US police force has to deal perhaps with one of the most dangerous situations in the world atleast in the big cities (actually probably nothing like Latin American drug war cartel, but John Doe doesn't know anything about policing there). Does it rationalize all that aggressive behavior? I don't know.




Guest

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#5 6 years ago

The fact is, cops are people, just like everyone else. Further, many people in America become cops for some reason like "school sucks, I like physical activity, and it's an exciting job." And so they just happen to be on the right side of the law, but they are messed up people, just like anyone else who would likely be seen as a criminal. Of coarse, there are good cops too, they just don't get the spotlight as often, because they're just doing their job, and no one really notices them. What the media and people in general do notice is when they do something wrong.

That said, it's disturbing how many cops do what normally would be considered breaking the law for retarded or made-up reasons and get away with it. Too bad there isn't a better way to filter out would-be cops. Even if that measure isn't taken, at least have consequences for things like tazing people without reason, more than just taking the guy's tazer away.




Antilles VIP Member

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#6 6 years ago

Well, I dont know the standards of American Police forces, but I know that the RCMP has quite high standards for the most part.

You go through 3 separate interviews, a polygraph and a physical. Then there is the hole 6 months at the depot in Regina, Saskatchewan. 32 applicants a term, with an average of about 6 dropping out I believe it was.

Compared to the Vancouver PD, where they go 6 weeks at the Justice Institute of BC.


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Nemmerle Forum Mod

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26th May 2003

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#7 6 years ago

The standard of the police depends a lot on the local culture, the local laws, the local police regulations....

In so far as you can talk in generalities. I've noticed police in the UK becoming a lot more belligerent over the last twenty odd years. And a lot of that seems to be down to the fact that performance is now assessed by the number of arrests, rather than the absence of crime.

So you're a bit of an arse to someone, he says fuck you - which violates s.5 of the public order act (foul or abusive language), you nick him and your arrest stats for the month go up. Whereas, before, they'd have been looking for an excuse not to nick you in order to avoid the paperwork.

I honestly do think the law should be set up to let the police be fairly lazy about most things. There are some things, like murder, theft, more severe acts of trespass - that you need to stamp on. But a lot of it - a guy swearing or the like, he's just having a bad night. It does no-one any good to spend the money taking him to court over it. You know, if you'd left him alone - chances are nothing would have happened.

And a lot of our legal system was set up around the assumption that the police would let it slide. Policemen are given incredibly broad authority to make the decision as to whether to arrest someone or not, in this country. Generally the law empowers them, rather than obligating them.

And then when you get to the custody suite the sergeant has to accept the arrest, and then the Crown Prosecution Service is meant to believe there's a public interest in pushing the case forward.

Which works fine, as long as there's no percentage for them to be arsey with it.

You even notice a certain cultural difference between forces, just from the sort of problems and people they have to deal with on a day to day basis given their resources. Central London cops are fairly smart okay people. The Met on the other hand... much more likely to run across an arsehole.

I've got to admit, around where I live, I just don't trust the cops. I've reported people on my land before and they've asked me to go and check they're still there. I've reported people walking across my land regularly, every night, and they've not been able to spare me someone to come wait down the bottom of the garden to pick them up. And then when I went down there myself and performed a citizens arrest the officers that turned up were all, 'Well, you should have had us do that really.' No, really?

And then they go around giving people orders without explaining themselves - which technically they have no authority to do. Believe it or not a policeman can't just turn up and ask for your I.D., can't just search you because he wants to - not without cause for his belief that you've done something.

But god damn, if they don't think they can.

A lot of that seems to be down to the rather poor training they get in this country though. Doesn't test long-term retention properly. Too similar to the school exams system.

Theoretically their two years probation under more experienced officers should see to that. But a lot of the more experienced officers have been getting out of the force as the standards have been slipping towards arrest quotas and greater amounts of paperwork and less funding and so on.

So....

Yeah.

I think the police service inherently attracts people who like power over others, or a bit of excitement, or both. And in the absence of enforcing certain standards on the police it will inherently tend to slide towards the negative end of the scale over time.... Even if you're in a situation where most of the people in the police are fairly decent.

I also think there's a lot of incentive for government - a system where the people's jobs exist to create laws - to let that happen. Part of it's just economic - the police and prison services employ a lot of people. Part of it's just survival. After all if there were no or little disorder it would be difficult to justify creating ever more laws.




Huffardo

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#8 6 years ago

Admiral Antilles;5614744Well, I dont know the standards of American Police forces, but I know that the RCMP has quite high standards for the most part.

You go through 3 separate interviews, a polygraph and a physical. Then there is the hole 6 months at the depot in Regina, Saskatchewan. 32 applicants a term, with an average of about 6 dropping out I believe it was.

Compared to the Vancouver PD, where they go 6 weeks at the Justice Institute of BC.

I guess that might partially explain why the Finnish police has such a good reputation despite only having 146 police officers per 100 000 people (Canada: 195, US: 233, UK: 333, Russia: 976), the basic police degree is 110 weeks or 2,5 years. To that you add any specialist courses etc.

How are the entrance exams in other areas? Here they start with a physical fitness test (for males: 1500 m run, weighted sit-ups, climbing a 230 cm high wall, carrying a 80 kg doll 20 m, chin-ups, bench press, swimming 100 m), a language exam, a written exam and a psychological review. The applicants who successfully passed these are invited to the second round. This includes an interview, a team work exercise and a second psychological review. The chosen applicants then have a full physical examination before they can start their studies. In 2011 less than 14 % of applicants received a study place at the police college.




Admiral Donutz VIP Member

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#9 6 years ago

Admiral Antilles;5614414For the Life of my, cant really think of anything else for a title.

Anyways

file.php?id=10632&t=1 (...)

Spoiler: Show

So, it turns out the officer was responding to a shoplifting call, in which someone had stolen from several stores. So the officer was doing her job. While she could have parked in the lane that runs outside the doors, its barely wide enough for 2 vehicles as is, and would have blocked the road. I know for a fact, because of how busy this entrance is, it is hard to get a spot close to the door, as it is quite busy. While the Handicap spots are almost always empty.

Because of the picture, the Police are actually investigating this, as to what happened, what not.

Finally, the RCMP in this area are actually the busiest in Canada per Capita because our detachment is severely shorthanded. A recent survey done by StatsCan said to properly police the area, we need another 40 officers. The city gave them 9.

Just seeing a (police)car parked like that shouldn't be a reason to jump to conclusions. In this case it turned out to be because the cop responded to an incident. Parking elsewhere might have been less practical or efficient so no harm done here. Obviously there are also plenty of cases in which cops do act like assholes and drive like idiots because they are lazy: illegal parking to grab a snack from a nearby shop, driving the wrong way to get to a shop for a snack etc.

The same rule of thumb should apply to anyone regardless of who they are: abide the rules including traffic (parking) rules. In certain situations it may be acceptable to ignore these rules such as an emergency. For example: Driving against traffic in a one way street (with very light or no traffic) to rush to the hospital with a passanger... if done responsibly I see no harm in that. That's why cops can let you go with a warning or take no action at all: there should be some flexibility because no law is perfect. Use common sense in daily life, sadly this can't be made into a law or objecively be enforced... ;)