Putin's United Russia wins elections 12 replies

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masked_marsoe VIP Member

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16th April 2005

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#1 11 years ago

Not really a surprise, but some interesting figures stand out:

United Russia has taken 63% of the vote, with 85% counted.

UR's support in Chechnya was 99.4%

The Communists are the second largest party, with just more than 11%, while the liberals of Russia have been in deep decline over the past years, only one liberal party making it above the threshold.

Putin may become Prime Minister after his term as President is up in 2008.




Flodgy

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27th May 2004

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#2 11 years ago

masked_marsoe;4067717Not really a surprise, but some interesting figures stand out:

United Russia has taken 63% of the vote, with 85% counted.

UR's support in Chechnya was 99.4%

The Communists are the second largest party, with just more than 11%, while the liberals of Russia have been in deep decline over the past years, only one liberal party making it above the threshold.

Putin may become Prime Minister after his term as President is up in 2008.

Yea just saw this on the news. No surprise at all, I mean, with what Putin believes in, easy for people to get swept up like that.

What do you think this could mean Marsoe?




masked_marsoe VIP Member

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#3 11 years ago

It's not just Putin's popularity, the other parties (especially the liberals) have struggled to survive. In an Al Jazeera report I saw, the reporter could only find two billboards suggesting there was even an election coming up, and one was the official election committee's, the other United Russia's.

But the Chechnya result surprised me the most. Putin oversaw the Second Chechen War in 1999 which virtually levelled the capital of Groznyy. Surely there must be more than 0.6% opposition.




Guest

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#4 11 years ago

well is this a good thing or a bad thing for the world?




Chemix2

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16th March 2005

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#5 11 years ago

Is this good or bad? See: Putin Vladimir Putin; Former head of KGB, current head of FSB (FSB= post USSR KGB). Possibly a murderer (or one who ordered the murder) of several media reporters as well as a former KGB operative. Kisses babies (on the head or stomach) while touring streets at election time. Strong involvement in the Chechnyan wars, as well as various more than immoral military actions. Potentially one of the evilist people alive on Earth today.

Good: No Bad: Zvyess




Karst

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6th January 2005

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#6 11 years ago

No surprise really, if the ruling party basically bans all opposition campains. There is no real opposition in Russia, just some unhappy individuals that can't bring together a coordinated effort against Putin because they don't agree on issues among each other.

What really dominated the poll was voter apathy. Even with widespread reports of people being forced to vote and manipulation, turnout was only 59 percent. 63 % of that really isn't that much.




MrFancypants Forum Admin

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#7 11 years ago

An election with 99% of votes for one party only happens in a totalitarian state, but then again it is not difficult to understand the Russian perspective, which accuses western media of being biased; whenever there is an allegation against Russia people are willing to believe it while similar accusations against other countries are either ignored or belittled as conspiracy-theories and that although Russia is currently far more peaceful than other countries and uses it's political capital to avoid worsening of current conflicts.

You also don't see a lot of articles about why Putin is so popular among Russians: after a long period of chaos and depression he is regarded as the reason why Russia is getting back some of it's former importance and wealth.




Chemix2

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#8 11 years ago

But wealth and importance for who? Where is the wealth of the children that we abandoned to orphanages that care nothing for them? What importance does the country have except as a relatively neutral nuclear power? which they had before Putin.




MrFancypants Forum Admin

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#9 11 years ago
Chemix2;4068155But wealth and importance for who? Where is the wealth of the children that we abandoned to orphanages that care nothing for them? What importance does the country have except as a relatively neutral nuclear power? which they had before Putin.

Sure, much of the wealth is unevenly distributed, but that's true for most countries. For the average Russian things are still better now than they were in the 90s, even if that's not great compared to some western nations.

As for importance, Russia has a lot of influence mostly because of their resources. Germany, for example, imports huge amounts of energy, which is a likely reason why German criticism of Russia is often not very strong. Russia also uses a lot of money to participate in European companies (or at least they try to), just as China does. Putin was also able to redirect more money to the military which is a good way to gain popularity in a country as patriotic as Russia.




Rikupsoni

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#10 11 years ago

It was intended that there would not be any political ads on the election day, yet it is funny to know what official signs the Moscow squares had:

_44241223_moscowputin_afp416b.jpg

MOSCOW VOTES FOR PUTIN!

Anyway, since the fanatical Putin Youth organisations have been enabled, it's been clear what is the direction of all this. Even problematic regions' elections such as Kosovo's last month have been a lot more democratic than Russia's. Russia is definately the most undemocratic country in Europe, after Belarus.

But you must understand that Russia has always had more or less a dictatorship, duke, tsar, Soviet premier. You can't except anything to change dramatically in a 120 million people country.

Of course it wouldn't matter that much to us, but since Russia is trying to flex muscles and boss smaller nations, we need to organize an united front against Russia.

Former Yugoslav republics need quickly to be integrated to European Union, before Russia starts influencing their politics. Ukraine can be integrated to Europe from Russia still, hope is not lost. It would be also very positive for former Yugoslav republics, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Kazakshtan, Austria, Ireland, Finland and Sweden to join NATO in near future.




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