Question, MASS 21 replies

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Red_Fist

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28th April 2010

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#1 8 years ago

Lets say we burned all the oil in the earth, created a carbon dust throughout time. Wouldn't the suns gravitational pull and our lower MASS change beyond enough to change our orbit ? (farther away) or not.




Nittany Tiger Forum Mod

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#2 8 years ago

No, because we never lost any mass. Burning it just creates more diffuse by-products, but the total mass of the by-products stays the same.




Andron Taps Forum Mod

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#3 8 years ago

^This.

Just remember the first law of thermodynamics:

Matter cannot be created or destroyed, it can only change form.


"I'd shush her zephyr." ~ Zephyr.



Red_Fist

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#4 8 years ago

A full cavern of un-burnt oil weighs a lot more before burning it.




MrFancypants Forum Admin

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#5 8 years ago
Red_Fist;5388908A full cavern of un-burnt oil weighs a lot more before burning it.

That may be because gas has a low density and escapes burning caverns, especially if a lot of gas is produced that increases the pressure in the cavern above the outside pressure. If you bottle up all the gas you get from burning one kg of oil you still end up with one kg of gas.




Nemmerle Forum Mod

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#6 8 years ago
Killer Kyle;5388797No, because we never lost any mass. Burning it just creates more diffuse by-products, but the total mass of the by-products stays the same.

How'd you get energy out of it then?




Mr. Matt VIP Member

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#7 8 years ago
Red_Fist;5388908A full cavern of un-burnt oil weighs a lot more before burning it.

I'm not sure what chemistry lessons are like in secondary school these days, but I think you have a basic misunderstanding of how combustion works.

Combustion, at its most basic, involves the combination of fuels with oxidants, with the energy potential of the fuel being released in the process - which is what we use to power our technology. We humans say that fire 'destroys' because it tends to cause havoc to our manmade structures. But in reality, in terms of raw physics, fire simply converts.

When you burn oil, the basic elements that it consists of remain alive and well. They are simply recombined into different chemical compounds. No mass is lost, simply dispersed. For example, oil is carbon-rich, and when combined with an oxidant such as air, a large quantity of carbon dioxide is produced as a result. It is transformed, not destroyed.

If you were to burn the entire oil supply of the planet, Earth's mass would remain the same. The only thing you would accomplish is depositing a lot of extra carbon dioxide, amongst other substances, into the atmosphere. And making our cars pretty redundant in the process.

The only way to do what you propose, would be to take all of the oil in the world and blast it off into space. Then the mass of the Earth itself would be affected, as you would have physically removed some of it.

Even then I very much doubt there's enough oil hidden in the crust of the planet to have a particularly dramatic effect on its mass. Why you would even want to try is beyond me.




MrFancypants Forum Admin

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#8 8 years ago

Nemmerle;5388944How'd you get energy out of it then?[/QUOTE] Most of the energy we get out of fuels is chemical energy; a result of changing the potential energy between different molecules. To harness the energy contained within atoms you'd have to use nuclear powerplants and even those convert only a fraction of the mass into energy. To convert 100% of a mass into energy you'd need a matter-antimatter reaction. Luckily that doesn't happen when you burn things.

[QUOTE=Mr. Matt;5388946] The only way to do what you propose, would be to take all of the oil in the world and blast it off into space. Then the mass of the Earth itself would be affected, as you would have physically removed some of it.

Even then I very much doubt there's enough oil hidden in the crust of the planet to have a particularly dramatic effect on its mass. Why you would even want to try is beyond me.

Shooting millions of tons of oil into space might have a bit of an effect due to the recoil though.




Mr. Matt VIP Member

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#9 8 years ago
MrFancypants;5388971Shooting millions of tons of oil into space might have a bit of an effect due to the recoil though.

Giant, low-pressure hose pipe.




Pethegreat VIP Member

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#10 8 years ago
No, because we never lost any mass. Burning it just creates more diffuse by-products, but the total mass of the by-products stays the same.

This.

The main byproducts of hydrocarbon combustion, CO2 and water, are used by plants. In an idea case when those plants die the carbon they trapped is put in the earth.

If you bottle up all the gas you get from burning one kg of oil you still end up with one kg of gas.

Actually you would end up with far more than 1kg of gas from burning 1kg of oil. You combine the oil with oxygen in order for combustion to actually occur. The ratio on average is 10 mols of oxygen(which weighs about 320grams) to every 1 mol of oil(which weights about 90 grams)

Note: the ratios above are an approximation. If you want the actual numbers with the math involved(simple algebra) let me know.