"You Crazy Kids!" 7 replies

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crisissuit3

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#1 8 years ago

Well I was working on a research paper for my advanced composition class and I chose the topic about why teenagers act recklessly. I first went into the mental aspect of the frontal lobes not being fully connected until I stumbled onto a completely different type of research. Basically its society and adults that keeps making teenagers do stupid things. So I'm going to post my paper and I'm not asking you guys to grade it or anything, I just want to know how my paper holds up from an argumentive stand point. also these were the links I got my research from. The Myth of the Teen Brain: A Q&A with Dr. Epstein , Christian Homeschooling, Education, Page 5 http://drrobertepstein.com/pdf/Epstein-THE_MYTH_OF_THE_TEEN_BRAIN-Scientific_American_Mind-4-07.pdf I am most certain that there are plenty of flaws within my arguments as well as grammar errors but this was done well into the dead of night.

Spoiler: Show
[COLOR=white]You Crazy Kids[/COLOR]

[COLOR=white]“Don’t do this!” “Why did you do this?” “What were you thinking?” These are comments that the typical teen hears from his or her parents. Teenagers are notorious for doing things that parents consider stupid. These stupid acts range from fighting with a sibling, drinking, and intense physical stunts. What causes them to want to do this? Is it a cry for help or a brash statement to the world? [/COLOR]

[COLOR=white]Teens have been the test subjects for countless studies on how the common teenager acts. The fact is that many teenagers have become young freedom fighters; they now fight against the belittlement from adults and against restrictions placed on them. As generations go on, restrictions have been placed on teens little by little to where they are treated as infants. Teenagers are barred from basic leisurely activities such as talking to friends at a mall as security swoops down telling them to leave the premises. [/COLOR]

[COLOR=white]In Robert Epstein’s article The Myth of the Teen Brain, he argues that society’s mistreatment of teens has caused them to become problematic in the eyes of society. To the average parent, teens have caused a variety of problems through drugs, teen pregnancy, violent outbursts, and overall laziness. Parents have good reason to believe that teens will be the end of the world as crimes can begin as early as age 13, possibly younger. So it is not shocking that laws and restrictions are placed on children to keep them safe from themselves.[/COLOR]

[COLOR=white]In an interview with Andrea Longbottom, Mr. Epstein stated that, “If you deny all young people the opportunity to join the adult world, many will become depressed, angry, and oppositional.” Teens are usually put at the bottom of the food chain when it comes to the world of work. Adults have a higher priority and this causes anger and frustration among teens as they are given less freedom to prove themselves amongst their elders and are yet again put down. Teens who are in this position then to begin feeling depressed as they feel as though they cannot succeed in life, angry that they are kept down like this, and are opposed to those who keep them down.[/COLOR]

[COLOR=white]However, teenager can be just as productive as adults; in fact, they have the potential be better than adults in the work force. In 2004, a study was conducted to see if there was a difference between teenagers and young adults in terms of work ethic. The testers were told to press a button when a light flashed and it would determine if they earned or lost money. An MRI scan showed that the portion of the brain that controlled motivation showed that both groups performed at an equal level. “When we treat kids like adults, they almost immediately rise to the challenge.”[/COLOR]

[COLOR=white]When teens feel like they have been abandoned by the adult world and are thought of as annoyances, they begin to search for others like them. They search for other teens who share their frustration in an attempt to seek acceptance. Mr. Epstein also says, “Today, with teens trapped in the frivolous world of peer culture, they learn virtually everything they know from one another rather than from the people they are about to become. Isolated from adults and wrongly treated like children, it is no wonder that some teens behave, by adult standards, recklessly or irresponsibly.” Basically, Mr. Epstein states that teens today do not learn from adults with experience, but from their peers who learn most of their life skills from the media like TV. And, what teens see on TV is usually not the discovery channel or news, but pop culture shows that emphasizes on personal gain.[/COLOR]

[COLOR=white]Many would argue that this is just another generational gap. They would say that the older generation has always looked down upon the younger generation and did everything they could to hold teens back. But over the past century, “teens have 10 times as many restrictions as adults, twice as many as active-duty U.S. marines, and twice as many as incarcerated felons.” So with double the restrictions, the younger generation will become even more troubling for adults. Obviously not every child is a bad seed but the risk has increased exponentially over the past few decades.[/COLOR]

[COLOR=white]Others would agree that teens are unruly but instead blame the mental factor of a young and underdeveloped brain. To this many agree that if that was to be the case, there would have been a long history, maybe even ancient history, of rowdy teenagers, in which there is no documented incident. In fact, most families were started in the early teen years which support the fact that teens did have the mental capability of making important decisions. This was due to the fact that most families were always together as sons and daughters were learning specific skills from a parent as well as certain values. Unlike today, most kids are forcefully taken from their parents to be put in an environment where they mainly learn from their peers who are inexperienced with the adult life.[/COLOR]

[COLOR=white]Unfortunately, many people would greatly oppose a society where teenagers are viewed as equal to adults. Industries that contribute to today’s culture are afraid of losing their no. 1 customers, parents who are afraid that their child may make a mistake somewhere down the road and entire fields of science would greatly fear the sudden change of teen mentality as it would be costly. So when you see a skateboarder grinding down the rails outside of a public library, you should think, “He is trying to prove that he is physically adept at this task.” When you see a pregnant teen walking on the sidewalk, try to think, “She is trying to prove that she can make the sacrifice.”[/COLOR]

[COLOR=white]Obviously there should be limits to this mentality, as a skateboarder can be relatable to the professional skateboarder who makes a living out of skating. The pregnant teen can be related with your everyday adult mother. But, if a teen speeds 80 miles per hour down a 30 mph road then that can be agreed by both teens and adults as reckless. Perhaps as time goes on there will be that perfect society where all teens are cared for and nurtured by their parents and are given the tools they need to succeed in a dog eat dog world. Maybe one day we will rid the term teenagers altogether and only have child and adult. [/COLOR]



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#2 8 years ago

Work hard.U will get success.Thanks.




MrFancypants Forum Admin

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#3 8 years ago

Interesting, but some points I don't agree with:

"The fact is that many teenagers have become young freedom fighters" The fact that teenagers rebel against their parents and authority in general isn't anything new. Teens have been doing that for ages, the only difference is that in our society these protests can take a different form. Teenage pregnancies could be considered one of these new forms, but it is wrong to say that they are acceptable. It is only possible at a larger scale due to bad parenting, bad education and tolerance to what would have made you a social outcast a few generations ago.

You could apply the same logic to any behavior of teens and justify or be at least apologetic about anything, thereby blaming the evil adults. Ultimately teens are responsible for their own actions, this includes overestimation of their own capabilities such as plans to give birth to a child when they aren't able to support or educate it on their own.

Also, I don't think teens suffer from more restrictions. The opposite is the case. Teens have more money available than ever (one of the reasons why their are a target group for many industries which in turn causes a bunch of problems such as alcohol addictions). They can easily circumvent any age restrictions on goods or media. School education keeps getting worse; there is less discipline and kids learn less.




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#4 8 years ago
MrFancypants;5421315 Also, I don't think teens suffer from more restrictions. The opposite is the case. Teens have more money available than ever (one of the reasons why their are a target group for many industries which in turn causes a bunch of problems such as alcohol addictions). They can easily circumvent any age restrictions on goods or media. School education keeps getting worse; there is less discipline and kids learn less.

Absolutely this. I should say that I had relative freedom to do pretty much whatever I wanted to, but for me there wasn't really anything that peaked my interests, I guess skateboarding and whatnot weren't things that looked fun. I always wanted to do adult things, I wanted to go to work at the earliest possible opportunity, but like you said, it seems most teens do have a hard time getting a good job almost anywhere. However, that's not to say that the possibility of working and making money is completely gone; when I was 16, I started an apprenticeship with my father in the field of HVAC, I learned a valuable trade, and I made good money from it.

Really, being a teenager is a phase of learning about adulthood, and how you choose to live out your teenage years is up to you. I personally don't think that all adults are part of some evil race of corporate businessmen that are trying to keep teenagers down to a lower level, some parents are incredibly stupid (I'm looking at the push-overs when I say this), but don't forget, it's the parents that are paying for your meals, your medical insurance, and your education, and they too had to start out as teenagers and prove themselves ready for adulthood.

I guess what I'm trying to say is that being a teenager is what you make of it, if you want to be treated like a child, then act like a child, but if you want to be treated like an adult, then act like an adult.


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#5 8 years ago

You should definitely be aware of this article: Electromagnetic pulse can be used to disrupt morality in the human brain It discusses a recent MIT experiment where a portion of the brain (the RTJP center) was blasted with electromagnetic rays while subjects made moral decisions. Under the influence of electromagnetism their moral center shut down and the risk/reward center became dominant. Situation: you are offered cake to kick puppies Your brain unmagnetized: I wouldn't kick puppies, it's wrong Your brain on magnetism: There is reward involved, so it's justified Interestingly,

Previous studies have found that the RTPJ becomes especially active when people think about others' behavior or thoughts. The new research suggests it plays an important role in moral judgments that involve understanding other people's intentions. "What is interesting is that this is a region that is very late developing - into adolescence and beyond right into the 20s," said Sarah-Jayne Blakemore of University College London "The next step would be to look at how or whether moral development changes through childhood into adulthood."

*Edit: My full comments (red)

Spoiler: Show
[COLOR=white]You Crazy Kids[/COLOR]

[COLOR=white]“Don’t do this!” “Why did you do this?” “What were you thinking?” These are comments that the typical teen hears from his or her parents. Teenagers are notorious for doing things that parents consider stupid[COLOR=red], such as[/COLOR] fighting with [COLOR=red]siblings[/COLOR], drinking, and intense physical stunts. Is [COLOR=red]the cause of this behavior[/COLOR] a cry for help or a brash statement to the world? [You need a thesis statement here. Is it a cry for help or a brash statement?][/COLOR]

[COLOR=white]Teens have been the test subjects for countless studies on how the common teenager acts [COLOR=red][This sentence is redundant, of course teens are the subjects of experiments on teenaged behavior][/COLOR]. The fact is that many teenagers have become young freedom fighters; they now fight against the belittlement from adults and against restrictions placed on them [COLOR=red][unsubstantiated][/COLOR]. As generations go on, restrictions have been placed on teens little by little to where they are treated as infants. Teenagers are barred from basic leisurely activities such as talking to friends at a mall as security swoops down telling them to leave the premises [COLOR=red][The average modern teen spends more time communicating with his peers via texting, facebook, and other social media than every before in history][/COLOR]. [/COLOR]

[COLOR=white]In Robert Epstein’s article The Myth of the Teen Brain, he argues that society’s mistreatment of teens has caused them to become problematic in the eyes of society. To the average parent, teens have caused a variety of problems through drugs, teen pregnancy, violent outbursts, and overall laziness. Parents have good reason to believe that teens will be the end of the world as crimes can begin as early as age 13, possibly younger. So it is not shocking that laws and restrictions are placed on children to keep them safe from themselves.[/COLOR]

[COLOR=white]In an interview with Andrea Longbottom, Mr. Epstein stated that, “If you deny all young people the opportunity to join the adult world, many will become depressed, angry, and oppositional.” Teens are usually put at the bottom of the food chain when it comes to the world of work. Adults have a higher priority and this causes anger and frustration among teens as they are given less freedom to prove themselves amongst their elders and are yet again put down. Teens who are in this position then to begin feeling depressed as they feel as though they cannot succeed in life, angry that they are kept down like this, and are opposed to those who keep them down.[/COLOR]

[COLOR=white]However, teenager can be just as productive as adults; in fact, they have the potential be better than adults in the work force. In 2004, a study was conducted to see if there was a difference between teenagers and young adults in terms of work ethic. The testers were told to press a button when a light flashed and it would determine if they earned or lost money. An MRI scan showed that the portion of the brain that controlled motivation showed that both groups performed at an equal level. “When we treat kids like adults, they almost immediately rise to the challenge.”[/COLOR]

[COLOR=white]When teens feel like they have been abandoned by the adult world and are thought of as annoyances, they begin to search for others like them. They search for other teens who share their frustration in an attempt to seek acceptance. Mr. Epstein also says, “Today, with teens trapped in the frivolous world of peer culture, they learn virtually everything they know from one another rather than from the people they are about to become. Isolated from adults and wrongly treated like children, it is no wonder that some teens behave, by adult standards, recklessly or irresponsibly.” Basically, Mr. Epstein states that teens today do not learn from adults with experience, but from their peers who learn most of their life skills from the media like TV. And, what teens see on TV is usually not the discovery channel or news, but pop culture shows that emphasizes on personal gain.[/COLOR]

[COLOR=white]Many would argue that this is just another generational gap. They would say that the older generation has always looked down upon the younger generation and did everything they could to hold teens back. But over the past century, “teens have 10 times as many restrictions as adults, twice as many as active-duty U.S. marines, and twice as many as incarcerated felons.” So with double the restrictions, the younger generation will become even more troubling for adults. Obviously not every child is a bad seed but the risk has increased exponentially over the past few decades.[/COLOR]

[COLOR=white]Others would agree that teens are unruly but instead blame the mental factor of a young and underdeveloped brain. To this many agree that if that was to be the case, there would have been a long history, maybe even ancient history, of rowdy teenagers, in which there is no documented incident. In fact, most families were started in the early teen years which support the fact that teens did have the mental capability of making important decisions. This was due to the fact that most families were always together as sons and daughters were learning specific skills from a parent as well as certain values. Unlike today, most kids are forcefully taken from their parents to be put in an environment where they mainly learn from their peers who are inexperienced with the adult life.[/COLOR]

[COLOR=white]Unfortunately, many people would greatly oppose a society where teenagers are viewed as equal to adults. Industries that contribute to today’s culture are afraid of losing their no. 1 customers, parents who are afraid that their child may make a mistake somewhere down the road and entire fields of science would greatly fear the sudden change of teen mentality as it would be costly. So when you see a skateboarder grinding down the rails outside of a public library, you should think, “He is trying to prove that he is physically adept at this task.” When you see a pregnant teen walking on the sidewalk, try to think, “She is trying to prove that she can make the sacrifice.”[/COLOR]

[COLOR=white]Obviously there should be limits to this mentality, as a skateboarder can be relatable to the professional skateboarder who makes a living out of skating. The pregnant teen can be related with your everyday adult mother. But, if a teen speeds 80 miles per hour down a 30 mph road then that can be agreed by both teens and adults as reckless. Perhaps as time goes on there will be that perfect society where all teens are cared for and nurtured by their parents and are given the tools they need to succeed in a dog eat dog world. Maybe one day we will rid the term teenagers altogether and only have child and adult.[/COLOR]

OK, I didn't get very far, but you have a weak argument. Your conclusion is that teens don't have enough social interaction with adults, and therefore we should understand that, deep down, they're good kids trying their best. That's not a valid argument. I think you need to develop a portion of your argument: Starting point: teens are not integrating into adult life as easily as they once did. 1) Historically there is a maturity loop where teenagers learn how to function in adult life through adult rolemodels 2) This generation has lost its connection to adult rolemodels, and interacts with peers to a greater degree than ever before 3) It is impossible to learn maturity from adolescant peers, therefore the maturation process has short-circuited 4) To fix the problem, we need to repair the level of interaction between teens and adult mentors




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#6 8 years ago

If the laws and restrictions were only placed on teens to keep them 'safe from themselves' how do you explain the original misbehaviour that caused these rules to be enacted? The rules in your argument are simultaneously the cause and product of the dysfunction.

...

The idea that we must choose between a cry for help and a brash statement to the world is a false dilemma. Simply because a behaviour arises from a certain set of causes doesn't mean it's an attempt to address those issues in favour of the result you prefer.




Joe Bonham

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#7 8 years ago

I liked it overrall. Just my two cents on it:

“Don’t do this!” “Why did you do this?” “What were you thinking?”

An interesting way to start. This might just be a stylistic preferrence, but I think this would look better in italics.

These are comments that the typical teen hears from his or her parents.

Poor way to phrase it, though I'm somewhat at a loss at how it could be phrased better. Here's a suggestion: "you thinking... the dreaded lectures and scoldings that the typical teenager endures from his or her parents.

Teenagers are notorious for doing things that parents consider stupid. These stupid acts range from fighting with a sibling, drinking, and intense physical stunts. What causes them to want to do this? Is it a cry for help or a brash statement to the world?

Not a good idea to say this (are notorious) unless you've got some kind of study or source that proves it. My suggestion: Teenagers often exaspurrate parents with their often reckless behavior, be it fighting with a sibling, drinking, or dangerous physical stunts.

What drives them to do this? Is it a cry for help... or a brash statement to the world. Teens have been the test subjects for countless studies on how the common teenager acts.

Source?

The fact is that many teenagers have become young freedom fighters; they now fight against the belittlement from adults and against restrictions placed on them

And they didn't before? I understand what you mean that there are increased restrictions on teenage behavior, but do modern teenagers really rebel any more than they did a hundred years ago? It wouuld be a good idea to expand this paragraph and provide some sort of explanation proving your statement to be true.

. As generations go on, restrictions have been placed on teens little by little to where they are treated as infants. Teenagers are barred from basic leisurely activities such as talking to friends at a mall as security swoops down telling them to leave the premises.

Never use ancedotes unless you have something to back it up with! Did this happen to you personally? A friend of yours? Did you read it somewhere? If you give specific examples, like guards swooping down on innocent teenagers, give proof!

In Robert Epstein’s article The Myth of the Teen Brain, he argues that society’s mistreatment of teens has caused them to become problematic in the eyes of society. To the average parent, teens have caused a variety of problems through drugs, teen pregnancy, violent outbursts, and overall laziness. Parents have good reason to believe that teens will be the end of the world as crimes can begin as early as age 13, possibly younger. So it is not shocking that laws and restrictions are placed on children to keep them safe from themselves. In an interview with Andrea Longbottom, Mr. Epstein stated that, “If you deny all young people the opportunity to join the adult world, many will become depressed, angry, and oppositional.” Teens are usually put at the bottom of the food chain when it comes to the world of work. Adults have a higher priority and this causes anger and frustration among teens as they are given less freedom to prove themselves amongst their elders and are yet again put down. Teens who are in this position then to begin feeling depressed as they feel as though they cannot succeed in life, angry that they are kept down like this, and are opposed to those who keep them down.

To build credibility, it would be a good idea to explain who Epstein is, and why I should care what his opinion is. What makes him an authority on the teen brain? Is he a scientist? A psychologist? A school counselor. I see that you linked to his article at the top of your post, but you need to offer some explanation in the body of your essay itself. lled motivation showed that both groups performed at an equal level.

“When we treat kids like adults, they almost immediately rise to tHowever, teenager can be just as productive as adults; in fact, they have the potential be better than adults in the work force. In 2004, a study was conducted to see if there was a difference between teenagers and young adults in terms of work ethic. The testers were told to press a button when a light flashed and it would determine if they earned or lost money. An MRI scan showed that the portion of the brain that controhe challenge.”

I'm sorry, but that just doesn't make any sense at all. Pushing a button is not the same as being a good worker! It's just a fact of life that a teenager cannot compete with an older adult in terms of job experience and education. Maybe in simple unskilled labor a teenager is useful, but as a financial manager or biologist? I'm not saying you're wrong, I'm just saying your statement (true or not) is going to look bogus unless you explain it a bit more. Flesh out this paragraph and explain why teenagers are the equal of older adults in the workforce.

When teens feel like they have been abandoned by the adult world and are thought of as annoyances, they begin to search for others like them. They search for other teens who share their frustration in an attempt to seek acceptance. Mr. Epstein also says, “Today, with teens trapped in the frivolous world of peer culture, they learn virtually everything they know from one another rather than from the people they are about to become. Isolated from adults and wrongly treated like children, it is no wonder that some teens behave, by adult standards, recklessly or irresponsibly.” Basically, Mr. Epstein states that teens today do not learn from adults with experience, but from their peers who learn most of their life skills from the media like TV. And, what teens see on TV is usually not the discovery channel or news, but pop culture shows that emphasizes on personal gain.

This is a very good paragraph, but be careful not to over rely on Epstein's article. Use his article as a source to back up your claims (statistics, etc etc), but try to make the actual argument your own as much as possible.

Many would argue that this is just another generational gap. They would say that the older generation has always looked down upon the younger generation and did everything they could to hold teens back. But over the past century, “teens have 10 times as many restrictions as adults, twice as many as active-duty U.S. marines, and twice as many as incarcerated felons.” So with double the restrictions, the younger generation will become even more troubling for adults. Obviously not every child is a bad seed but the risk has increased exponentially over the past few decades.

Is that a quote from Epstein? If so, it puzzles me. 10 times as many restrictions... twice as many marines... twice as many incarcerated. Seems to me this works against your argument, not for it. Teens in jail and the marines seems to PROVE that they are troublemakers, not DISprove it.

Others would agree that teens are unruly but instead blame the mental factor of a young and underdeveloped brain. To this many agree that if that was to be the case, there would have been a long history, maybe even ancient history, of rowdy teenagers, in which there is no documented incident. In fact, most families were started in the early teen years which support the fact that teens did have the mental capability of making important decisions. This was due to the fact that most families were always together as sons and daughters were learning specific skills from a parent as well as certain values. Unlike today, most kids are forcefully taken from their parents to be put in an environment where they mainly learn from their peers who are inexperienced with the adult life.

Which might be true. But there are a lot of other factors at work here. For starters, the overrall life span of the average person in history was much shorter than it is today. It's possible that teenagers weren't more mature than today... adults were just LESS mature simply because most people died or became senile before they had the time to reach any real level of maturity. Also, wars have always been fought by teenagers and young adults. Most crime is carried out by teenagers and young adults, regardless of the era.

Unfortunately, many people would greatly oppose a society where teenagers are viewed as equal to adults. Industries that contribute to today’s culture are afraid of losing their no. 1 customers, parents who are afraid that their child may make a mistake somewhere down the road and entire fields of science would greatly fear the sudden change of teen mentality as it would be costly. So when you see a skateboarder grinding down the rails outside of a public library, you should think, “He is trying to prove that he is physically adept at this task.” When you see a pregnant teen walking on the sidewalk, try to think, “She is trying to prove that she can make the sacrifice.”

You raise a good point. Big difference between society now and previous societies is the lack of a real coming of age ceremony or test. There's nothing in our culture to make a young person (especially boys) feel like an adult/man. In fact, that's an interesting theme that you only touched lightly in your essay - does this culture of repression of teenagers affect boys and girls differently? And if so, how?

Obviously there should be limits to this mentality, as a skateboarder can be relatable to the professional skateboarder who makes a living out of skating.

How so? Am I relatable to a nascar driver?

The pregnant teen can be related with your everyday adult mother.

Except she's not married, probably isn't even out of school yet, and has no way to support herself, let alone the baby.

But, if a teen speeds 80 miles per hour down a 30 mph road then that can be agreed by both teens and adults as reckless.

Why is speeding reckless, but teenage pregnancy and dangerous "physical stunts" are okay?

Perhaps as time goes on there will be that perfect society where all teens are cared for and nurtured by their parents and are given the tools they need to succeed in a dog eat dog world. Maybe one day we will rid the term teenagers altogether and only have child and adult.

Your conclusion has a rushed feel to it. I know, because my conclusions are usually like that too. It's easy to get burned out by the end of your essay and you just want to get the stupid thing over with.




crisissuit3

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#8 8 years ago

I very much appreciate the support. I posted this paper mainly to get some eyebrows raising. I was hoping that it would give a new way for some people to look at teens.

I've already turned in the paper (as it was several weeks late...) but if I ever do find the urge to re-write the article I most certainly will because I think I can really make this topic come alive and may be of some use in the future.