Repress U 17 replies

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26th June 2000

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#1 11 years ago

Repress U

Free-speech zones. Taser guns. Hidden cameras. Data mining. A new security curriculum. Private security contractors. Welcome to the homeland security campus.

From Harvard to UCLA, the ivory tower is fast becoming the latest watchtower in Fortress America. The terror warriors, having turned their attention to "violent radicalization and homegrown terrorism prevention"--as it was recently dubbed in a House of Representatives bill of the same name--have set out to reconquer that traditional hotbed of radicalization, the university.

Building a homeland security campus and bringing the university to heel is a seven-step mission:

1. Target dissidents. As the warfare state has triggered dissent, the campus has attracted increasing scrutiny--with student protesters in the cross hairs. The government's number-one target? Peace and justice organizations.

From 2003 to 2007 an unknown number of them made it into the Pentagon's Threat and Local Observation Notice system (TALON), a secretive domestic spying program ostensibly designed to track direct "potential terrorist threats" to the Defense Department itself. In 2006 the ACLU uncovered, via Freedom of Information Act requests, at least 186 specific TALON reports on "anti-military protests" in the United States--some listed as "credible threats"--from student groups at the University of California, Santa Cruz; State University of New York, Albany; Georgia State University; and New Mexico State University, among other campuses.

At more than a dozen universities and colleges, police officers now double as full-time FBI agents, and according to the Campus Law Enforcement Journal, they serve on many of the nation's 100 Joint Terrorism Task Forces. These dual-purpose officer-agents have knocked on student activists' doors from North Carolina State to the University of Colorado and, in one case, interrogated an Iraqi-born professor at the University of Massachusetts about his antiwar views.

FBI agents, or their campus stand-ins, don't have to do all the work. Administrators often do it for them, setting up "free-speech zones," which actually constrain speech, and punishing those who step outside them. Protests were typically forced into "free-assembly areas" at the University of Central Florida and Clemson University, while students at Hampton and Pace universities faced expulsion for handing out antiwar fliers, aka "unauthorized materials."

2. Lock and load. Many campus police departments are morphing into heavily armed garrisons, equipped with a wide array of weaponry, from Taser stun guns and pepper guns to shotguns and semiautomatic rifles. Lock-and-load policies that began in the 1990s under the rubric of the "war on crime" only escalated with the President's "war on terror." Each school shooting--most recently the massacre at Virginia Tech--adds fuel to the armament flames.

Two-thirds of universities arm their police, according to the Justice Department. Many of the guns being purchased were previously in the province of military units and SWAT teams: for instance, AR-15 rifles (similar to M-16s) are in the arsenals of the University of Texas campus police. Last April City University of New York bought dozens of semiautomatic handguns. Some states, like Nevada, are even considering plans to allow university staff to pack heat in a "special reserve officer corps."

Most of the force used on campuses these days, though, comes in less lethal form, such as the rubber bullets and pepper pellets increasingly used to contain student demonstrations. Then there is the ubiquitous Taser, the electroshock weapon recently ruled a "form of torture" by the United Nations. A Taser was used by UCLA police in November 2006 to deliver shock after shock to an Iranian-American student for failing to produce his ID at the Powell Library. A University of Florida student was Tased last September after asking pointed questions of Senator John Kerry at a public forum, his plea "Don't Tase me, bro!" becoming the stuff of pop folklore.

The rest is on the link. Astounding.




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#2 11 years ago

Considering every professor I've had but one is the definition of liberal, some practically communist, I don't see the University ever being "pacified" in this way. A few things I lol'd at in the article

while students at Hampton and Pace universities faced expulsion for handing out antiwar fliers, aka "unauthorized materials."

I also have to get permission to hand out fliers if I want to advertise for my Anthropology club, or to give away a litter of puppies, or find a room mate for my apartment. I don't know the specific circumstances but they probably could have handed them out if they got permission first. I see anti-war stuff here all the time.

or instance, AR-15 rifles (similar to M-16s) are in the arsenals of the University of Texas campus police.

Hmmm I wonder why they have those.

On August 1, 1966, Texas student Charles Whitman barricaded the upper floor of the observation deck in the tower of the Main Building. With several rifles and various other weapons, he killed 14 people on campus and wounded many more inside the observation deck room, and from the observation deck which surrounds the tower



Commissar MercZ

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#3 11 years ago

I have definately noted the changes in campus security's arms, though they have been able to deflect that with the excuse of securing the campus from violence.

Though it doesn't really surprise me. There's always been a degree of distrust towards universities, particularly after the demonstrations in the 1960s and 1970s. It is one of the ways that there are designated "free-speech" zones on Campuses nowadays.

Afterburner;5015916 Hmmm I wonder why they have those.

The bell tower massacre happened almost 40 years ago, but they only started arming the campuses recently in response to more recent school violence.

Though the UT campuses at Austin, Arlington, and mine at Dallas/Richardson have a high concentration of certain minorities in recent years, which makes me skeptical about my campus's true intentions.




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#4 11 years ago

Commissar MercZ;5015923 The bell tower massacre happened almost 40 years ago, but they only started arming the campuses recently in response to more recent school violence.

Though the UT campuses at Austin, Arlington, and mine at Dallas/Richardson have a high concentration of certain minorities in recent years...

I was more just making a general statement about campus violence. I think it is perfectly fine to give campus police the tools needed to protect the campus, such as firearms. It's all in how they are used.

The "Free-speech zones" on the other hand are ridiculous. I know some schools have rules about simply not disrupting classes, which is fine in my book, it's like not being able to disrupt traffic or other people if protesting in public, but anything beyond that is oppression, pure and simple.




crisissuit3

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#5 11 years ago
Afterburner;5015931I was more just making a general statement about campus violence. I think it is perfectly fine to give campus police the tools needed to protect the campus, such as firearms. It's all in how they are used. The "Free-speech zones" on the other hand are ridiculous. I know some schools have rules about simply not disrupting classes, which is fine in my book, it's like not being able to disrupt traffic or other people if protesting in public, but anything beyond that is oppression, pure and simple.

I dont know, i would feel a little nervous with shotguns being carried around me. I would also like a little privacy. But, i dont mind the security cameras as long as i can see them. But this also saddens me that the world is so jumpy that we fear that anyone who says Bomb jokingly will have his face smashed against the side of a swat truck.




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#6 11 years ago
crisissuit3;5015998I dont know, i would feel a little nervous with shotguns being carried around me. I would also like a little privacy. But, i dont mind the security cameras as long as i can see them.

Pistols are the only weapons carried on patrol, you'd never see a cop just wandering around with anything else. Larger weapons are either stored at the station or kept in the trunk of the car.

But this also saddens me that the world is so jumpy that we fear that anyone who says Bomb jokingly will have his face smashed against the side of a swat truck.

The police aren't that quite jumpy.




crisissuit3

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#7 11 years ago
Afterburner;5016002Pistols are the only weapons carried on patrol, you'd never see a cop just wandering around with anything else. Larger weapons are either stored at the station or kept in the trunk of the car. The police aren't that quite jumpy.

No but the people who call them are.




Scientist Dr. Professor

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#8 11 years ago

Last year my university had a "active shooter" training response drill on campus. The UPD used the Justice Studies building that we have. They came in on a Friday, locked down the building and the UPD came in and "cleared" it, they had M4s with blank adapters and everything. Justice Studies students acted as the victims, there was fake blood and gore everywhere, it was freaking cool.




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#9 11 years ago

I was at Harvard in June for my brother's commencement (just had to throw that out there :smokin:), and I have to say that, based on my experience there, I think homeland security will have a bitch of a time getting the bigger private and more liberal schools in the US to get on board with such programs. Especially smaller liberal arts schools. Obviously public schools and institutions will be different.

This is precisely the same thing - albeit with different names for the "targets" - that happened in the sixties, during the civil rights movements and in the run up to the Vietnam war. FBI plants, agent provocateurs, they had it all. The Howard Zinn documentary You Can't Be Neutral On A Moving Train (available on YouTube and I think released for free around the internet) provides a good look at the campus environment during Vietnam War protests in the sixties. The governments invasion of the universities created an unprecedented backlash against the security regime then, from students and faculty alike.

Remember the Kent State massacre? If anyone hasn't heard of it look it up. I highly doubt things will get so bad again. At the very least, not worse than the anti-radicalization policies the Bush Administration forced on universities. Well I hope not.




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#10 11 years ago

Jeffro;5015903 The rest is on the link. Astounding.[/QUOTE]

:rolleyes:

:cort:

You produce one of these threads daily.

1. Target dissidents. As the warfare state has triggered dissent, the campus has attracted increasing scrutiny--with student protesters in the cross hairs. The government's number-one target? Peace and justice organizations. [/QUOTE] Awesome. They are not at all "justice", btw, just pussy ass bitches who would let home invasion robbers sodimize them with power tools.

These dual-purpose officer-agents have knocked on student activists' doors from North Carolina State to the University of Colorado and, in one case, interrogated an Iraqi-born professor at the University of Massachusetts about his antiwar views. [/QUOTE] Calling bullshit on that one.

FBI agents, or their campus stand-ins, don't have to do all the work. Administrators often do it for them, setting up "free-speech zones," which actually constrain speech, and punishing those who step outside them. Protests were typically forced into "free-assembly areas" at the University of Central Florida and Clemson University, while students at Hampton and Pace universities faced expulsion for handing out antiwar fliers, aka "unauthorized materials." [/QUOTE] :rofl: again, calling bullshit, but with a humoristic tone.

2. Lock and load. Many campus police departments are morphing into heavily armed garrisons, equipped with a wide array of weaponry, from Taser stun guns and pepper guns to shotguns and semiautomatic rifles. [/QUOTE] I would hardly call that "armed garrisons", when they have no more weaponry than the local police department. And thats what they are.....

Lock-and-load policies that began in the 1990s under the rubric of the "war on crime"....

Actually lock-and-load policies began way before the 90's.

[QUOTE=] Two-thirds of universities arm their police, according to the Justice Department.

Good point. Take away the weaponry. So next time some looser who got his world of warcraft account deleted decided to go postal, cops cant do a damn thing about it, and then everybody cries that the cops should be armed.

[QUOTE=] Many of the guns being purchased were previously in the province of military units and SWAT teams: for instance, AR-15 rifles (similar to M-16s) are in the arsenals of the University of Texas campus police.

And...?

[QUOTE=] Last April City University of New York bought dozens of semiautomatic handguns. Some states, like Nevada, are even considering plans to allow university staff to pack heat in a "special reserve officer corps."

....and? Whats the problem here? Half you civilians cant operate the damn pistols, the other half cant spell "pistol", and all of them couldnt shoot the gun-controllers in arcade video games, let alone a real firearm.

[QUOTE=] Then there is the ubiquitous Taser, the electroshock weapon recently ruled a "form of torture" by the United Nations.

:lol: Oh really? Show me proof of that. I want the UN resolution number that specifically decries the taser a form of torture. Because getting a few volts in your body is soooo much like having bamboo reeds shot up under your fingernails. :rolleyes:

[QUOTE=]On August 1, 1966, Texas student Charles Whitman barricaded the upper floor of the observation deck in the tower of the Main Building. With several rifles and various other weapons, he killed 14 people on campus and wounded many more inside the observation deck room, and from the observation deck which surrounds the tower

You didnt mention where he got his marksmanship skills..... :D




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