Saddam trial judge resigns in protest 31 replies

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AzH

I'm too cool to Post

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16th September 2003

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#1 12 years ago

THE chief judge trying Saddam Hussein has submitted his resignation, sources have said, in a protest at political interference that casts new doubt on the US-backed Iraqi Government's ability to ensure a fair trial.

High Tribunal officials were trying to talk Kurdish judge Rizgar Amin out of his decision, a source close to the judge said yesterday, adding Judge Amin was reluctant to stay because Shia leaders had criticised him for being soft on Saddam in court.

"He tendered his resignation to the court a few days ago but the court rejected it," the source said. "Now talks are under way to convince him to go back on his decision. He's under a lot of pressure; the whole court is under political pressure.

"He had complaints from the Government that he was being too soft in dealing with Saddam Hussein and his co-defendants. They (government leaders) want things to go faster."

A news agency also reported a court official confirming the judge's resignation, though two judges said earlier the resignation reports were not true.

Technically the departure of the presiding magistrate on the five-judge panel can be overcome by appointing a substitute; but Judge Amin's complaints about government interference may in the long term affect the credibility of the trial.

The killing of two defence lawyers had already highlighted problems with the process amid a virtual civil war that pits Saddam's fellow minority Sunnis against a US-sponsored Government run by Shi'ites and ethnic Kurds intent on quickly hanging a man they say massacred their peoples.

International human rights lawyers have urged US officials and the new Iraqi Government to send Saddam and his aides to an international court abroad while the defence has branded the proceedings "victor's justice" imposed under occupation.

"The defence team has long warned about the dangers of political pressure that has undermined the court's independence and integrity," said Saddam's chief lawyer, Khalil Dulaimi.

"We expect the political pressures to mount on the court after ... the farce it has turned out to be."

The source close to Judge Amin said: "There's too much pressure ... it is a question of integrity.

"I am not sure if he will go back on his decision. I don't think it's possible."

Judge Amin, 48, said in November that his family was worried about him and said he had taken on two bodyguards after pressure from friends. But he stressed: "A judge should never be afraid."

Spokesmen for the High Tribunal were not available for comment on a weekend following the Eid al-Adha holiday.

In the first trial, which has sat for seven days since October 19 and is due to resume on Tuesday week, Saddam and seven others are charged with crimes against humanity in the deaths of more than 140 Shia men after an assassination attempt on Saddam in 1982.

After hearings last month, some observers criticised Judge Amin for allowing Saddam to speak at length, making allegations, including of maltreatment at American hands.

The judge, whose dry wit and courteous manner have been features of the proceedings so far, rejected the criticism and insisted the defence should have a fair hearing.

The confusion over the judge's resignation comes as the head of the team of international experts investigating Sunni complaints

of fraud in Iraq's December 15 vote said their preliminary findings would be delivered overnight or today.

An election official said he hoped for final election results within a week.

Source.

This is going to cause some major harm to international opinion on the viability of this trial (which many people consider to be a sham anyway). If the judge thinks the trial is unfair, I think people should take note.




Nostradamouse

The Arrogant French Prick

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5th December 2004

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#2 12 years ago
AzHSource. This is going to cause some major harm to international opinion on the viability of this trial (which many people consider to be a sham anyway). If the judge thinks the trial is unfair, I think people should take note.

A trial instigated by his ennemies? IMO its the justice of the winner, not the blind justice...

But dont worry, im not a Saddam lover.




Nederbörd

Has mutated into a Lurker

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12th March 2005

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#3 12 years ago

I wonder if he shouldn't be trialed in Den Haag instead of somewhere in Iraq. I think it would be much more fair there. However the people seem to want him judged in Iraq. Anyway, I hope that he'll get what he deserves.




Admiral Donutz VIP Member

Wanna go Double Dutch?

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9th December 2003

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#4 12 years ago

They could always sent him to the International Court of Justice here in Den Haag (The Hague). I can see how the Iraqi's want to trial Saddam themself's but still. It would be more neutral probably (though every court may be biased to some extend, we are all humans with opinions).




ScOrPY VIP Member

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17th November 2003

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#5 12 years ago

I never thought this trial would be fair, I expect him to be found guilty nonetheless. Let the Iraqi people deal with this 'person'.




Mihail VIP Member

President of Novistrana

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19th January 2003

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#6 12 years ago

It's not a trial, it was never intended to be, it's merely a show put on, the trial should be held outside of iraq.




Komrad_B

Score Monkey

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2nd September 2004

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#7 12 years ago
Großadmiral DönitzThey could always sent him to the International Court of Justice here in Den Haag (The Hague). I can see how the Iraqi's want to trial Saddam themself's but still. It would be more neutral probably (though every court may be biased to some extend, we are all humans with opinions).

Yes, the International Court of Justice should judge him. "Important" individuals (like bloodthirsty dictators) should always be judged there anyways, like they did with Milosevic.

The problem is, they want Saddam dead, and the easiest way for them to kill him is by doing a mock trial (what we see now). It is sad that while attempting to "bring democracy in Iraq", the occupants encourage false trials similar to what the dictator himself did. I don't think this is a good example for the Iraquis, they need to see true justice, and not the justice of the strong they have been accustomed to for hundreds of years.




-DarthMaul-

I'm way cooler than n0e (who isn't though?)

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11th February 2003

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#8 12 years ago

why the hell is a trial needed anyhow? I know alot of people would rather seem him dead then wasting time in a court..how the hell do you deny the chargers against you killing hundreds and thousands of people?

just kill him and get it over with, no one is holding his breath over the results of the trial.




Mihail VIP Member

President of Novistrana

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19th January 2003

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#9 12 years ago
how the hell do you deny the chargers against you killing hundreds and thousands of people?

Yeah I wonder, why are there no charges against bush yet?




GreatGrizzly

Fear the Bear

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22nd February 2005

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#10 12 years ago

lol Anyways, I think they should just hand him over to the people that hate him. Quick and easy.