Santorum suspends primary run 10 replies

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Commissar MercZ

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#1 7 years ago

After being unable to pose some results on the April 3rd primaries as well his daughter being admitted to the hospital, Santorum decided to suspend his campaign. While it is not technically ended, it is effectively over for him. Ron Paul and Newt Gingrich are still in the primaries- Gingrich might be able to get the 'anti-Romney' vote here from now on, but without a solid backing from Santorum as well as how far the campaign has gone already, it is going to be difficult to turn the tide for him.

Rick Santorum drops out of the presidential race - The Washington Post

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Updated at 3:09 p.m.

Rick Santorum announced Tuesday that he is suspending his presidential campaign, all but bringing to a close the 2012 GOP presidential contest and effectively handing the nomination to Mitt Romney.

“We made a decision over the weekend that, while this presidential race for us is over — for me — and we will suspend our campaign effective today, we are not done fighting,” Santorum said at a campaign event in Gettysburg, Pa., the site of the historic and pivotal Civil War battle.

The former Pennsylvania senator had been Romney’s top opponent, but he suffered a trio of defeats last week in Wisconsin, Maryland and the District of Columbia, and over the weekend his daughter, Bella, was hospitalized for the second time this campaign due to complications from a rare genetic disorder.

In announcing his decision, Santorum said Bella’s condition caused him to reconsider his campaign but that she “is a fighter and doing extraordinarily well.”

He did not endorse or urge the delegates that he has won to support another candidate, but spokesman Hogan Gidley told MSNBC that the Romney campaign has requested a meeting about an endorsement, which he said Santorum is “open” to.

Santorum is currently second in the delegate race, but he would have to win upwards of three-fourths of the remaining delegates in order to secure the nomination.

Instead, he seemed to be hoping that Romney would fall short of the delegate threshold and that he could snatch the nomination at the Republican National Convention in August.

Santorum called Romney before his announcement Tuesday to inform him of his decision to drop out, according to a Romney campaign official.

“This race was as improbable as any race you’ll ever see for president,” Santorum said.

Former House speaker Newt Gingrich and Texas Rep. Ron Paul remain in the campaign, but neither has shown the ability to be a consistent alternative to Romney. Gingrich, in particular, has seen his campaign hit a rough patch of late. He’s finished fourth in the last two major contests and revealed over the weekend that his campaign was $4.5 million in debt.

Santorum’s exit virtually assures that Romney will secure the Republican Party’s nomination, though he so far has secured only about 60 percent of the delegates that he needs.

In a statement, Romney congratulated his opponent.

“Sen. Santorum is an able and worthy competitor, and I congratulate him on the campaign he ran,” Romney said. “He has proven himself to be an important voice in our party and in the nation. We both recognize that what is most important is putting the failures of the last three years behind us and setting America back on the path to prosperity.”

Republican leaders in recent weeks have been slowly coalescing around Romney, calling for an end to an increasingly arduous campaign that some say threatens the party’s chances in November.

That trend continued Tuesday, with Iowa Gov. Terry Branstad endorsing Romney shortly before Santorum’s announcement and Florida Gov. Rick Scott endorsing Romney shortly afterward. (Scott’s endorsement may not help Romney — he’s quite unpopular as governor of a key swing state — but today is a good day for that endorsement to get lost in the news.)

“Mitt Romney will be our party’s nominee and it is critical that all Republicans coalesce behind Gov. Romney and focus on electing him as president so he can put the policies in place to create jobs, turn our economy around and get federal spending under control,” Scott said in a statement.

A new Washington Post/ABC News poll this week showed a majority of Republican-leaning Americans — 52 percent — said Santorum should stay in the campaign, while 43 percent said he should drop out.

By suspending his campaign rather than ending it, Santorum can continue to raise money to retire any remaining debt he might have.

In the end, Santorum won contests in 11 states, but all of his primary victories were relegated to the South, and he failed to win any of a string of primaries in the Midwest in recent weeks.

Santorum Suspends Presidential Campaign - NYTimes.com

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3:08 p.m. | Updated Rick Santorum suspended his presidential campaign on Tuesday, bowing to the inevitability of Mitt Romney’s nomination and ending his improbable, come-from-behind quest to become the party’s conservative standard-bearer in the fall.

“We made a decision over the weekend, that while this presidential race for us is over, for me, and we will suspend our campaign today, we are not done fighting,” Mr. Santorum said.

Mr. Santorum made the announcement at a stop in his home state of Pennsylvania after a weekend in which he tended to his 3-year-old daughter, Bella, who had been hospitalized with pneumonia.

Mr. Santorum, who was holding back tears, did not exactly specify why he was ending his presidential bid. He referred to his daughter’s illness, but said she was making great progress and was back home after being hospitalized over the weekend.

Mr. Santorum called Mr. Romney earlier in the day to tell him of his plans to suspend his campaign. Mr. Santorum told Mr. Romney that he is committed to defeating President Obama, but that he is not going to endorse immediately, said a source familiar with the call.

Mr. Santorum made no mention of Mr. Romney in a 12-minute speech in which he extolled the people he had met during the campaign and said he was inspired by their stories of struggle and faith.

After spending months accusing Mr. Romney of being a weak challenger for President Obama, Mr. Santorum said only that he would continue to fight to elect a Republican president and to ensure Republican control of Congress.

“This game is a long, long, long way from over,” he said.

Mr. Romney issued a statement moments after Mr. Santorum concluded his remarks.

“Senator Santorum is an able and worthy competitor, and I congratulate him on the campaign he ran,” Mr. Romney said. “He has proven himself to be an important voice in our party and in the nation. We both recognize that what is most important is putting the failures of the last three years behind us and setting America back on the path to prosperity.”

As recently as December, Mr. Santorum was operating a shoestring campaign in Iowa, traveling with just a handful of aides in a pickup truck. But his brand of conservative populism caught fire in Iowa, where he defeated Mr. Romney. And then it caught fire again in several Midwest primaries in which he surprised Mr. Romney.

But ultimately, Mr. Santorum’s campaign struggled under a nearly constant barrage of negative ads paid for by Mr. Romney and the “super PAC” supporting him, Restore Our Future, which has spent millions in an effort to ensure that Mr. Romney captures the nomination in his second attempt.

Mr. Santorum’s withdrawal abruptly upends not only the political calculus for Mr. Romney and his campaign team, but also their financial picture.

Both candidates had faced fund-raising challenges in the coming weeks, with Mr. Santorum limping by on fumes and Mr. Romney rapidly tapping his top contributors for the maximum contribution, challenging him to seek out new sources of cash. Mr. Romney had committed $2.9 million to the Pennsylvania primary, hoping to deliver Mr. Santorum a knockout blow, and Restore Our Future had begun spending there as well.

Mr. Santorum’s withdrawal will allow both Mr. Romney and the super PAC to redirect that money to other states, either to head off any lingering challenge from Newt Gingrich and Representative Ron Paul of Texas, or to begin preparing for what seems to be an increasingly likely general election matchup against Mr. Obama.

A former congressman and senator from Pennsylvania, Mr. Santorum had built a reputation as an unwavering social conservative whose opposition to abortion and same-sex marriage helped catapult him into national office.

Among the people who had been publicly encouraging Mr. Santorum to reconsider a drawn-out challenge to Mr. Romney were some evangelical leaders who had been suspicious of Mr. Romney’s commitment to their most important causes.

Richard Land, the president of the ethics commission at the Southern Baptist Convention, said as much an hour before word of Mr. Santorum’s decision reached the press.

“As his friend, I would say, you know you’ve done an incredible job resurrecting your career. You’ve done better than anybody thought you could,” Mr. Land told reporters and editors of The New York Times.

Mr. Land said that if Mr. Santorum pressed ahead, he would jeopardize that success. And he said that Mr. Santorum had a good future if he acknowledged Mr. Romney’s claim to the nomination this year.

“In eight years, Rick Santorum will be three years younger than Romney is now. He’s only 53 years old,” Mr. Land said. “He’ll be a significant player. I would think he could have a significant role in a Romney administration if he wanted to. Maybe H.H.S. secretary?”

Ralph Reed, a leading social conservative who oversees the Faith and Freedom Coalition, said Mr. Santorum had proved himself as the strongest insurgent conservative candidate since Ronald Reagan in 1976.

“It was an impressive performance and it leaves him with an elevated status and a prominent role as a leader for evangelicals and conservatives,” Mr. Reed said on Tuesday. “No one can know what the future holds, but my guess is we haven’t heard the last from Rick Santorum.”

Mr. Santorum’s candidacy benefited from the comparison to Mr. Romney as the Republican candidates appealed to a conservative segment of the Republican Party during the primary process. Mr. Santorum regularly mocked Mr. Romney as a flip-flopper on social and conservative issues who could not be trusted.

That helped Mr. Santorum win several Southern primaries in which evangelical voters and Tea Party supporters dominated the primary electorate.

But Mr. Santorum also cast himself as the true economic conservative who understood the needs of the middle class. His campaign attacked Mr. Romney, a multimillionaire, as out of touch with the needs and interests of regular working Americans.

Mr. Santorum’s quick rise in the polls also led to repeated gaffes that knocked him off that economic message and pulled him back into an extended conversation about contraception and other social issues.

Those issues did not play as well in states like Ohio, Michigan, Wisconsin and Illinois, where Mr. Santorum lost to Mr. Romney. Those losses helped create a mounting sense of frustration inside the Republican establishment that Mr. Santorum was waging a quixotic battle against Mr. Romney that would ultimately hurt the party’s chances against Mr. Obama.

Mr. Santorum’s decision will all but clear the way for Mr. Romney to claim the nomination.

Mr. Gingrich recently scaled back his ambitions, acknowledging that it was impossible for him to accumulate enough delegates to win the nomination before the national convention. Mr. Gingrich conceded on Sunday that Mr. Romney would most likely be the nominee, and said his primary goal in continuing to campaign was to influence the party’s platform at the convention.

Mr. Gingrich released a statement praising Mr. Santorum and his campaign, but also stressing his commitment to remaining in the race.

“I am committed to staying in this race all the way to Tampa so that the conservative movement has a real choice,” the statement read. “I humbly ask Senator Santorum’s supporters to visit Newt.org to review my conservative record and join us as we bring these values to Tampa. We know well that only a conservative can protect life, defend the Constitution, restore jobs and growth and return to a balanced budget.”

Mr. Paul also is continuing to wage his effort to win the Republican nomination and is scheduled to campaign this week.

But Mr. Santorum had been the last remaining candidate with a potential shot at stopping Mr. Romney — and even that opportunity was dwindling fast as Mr. Romney accumulated delegates.

Officials at the Republican National Committee had already begun considering the possibilities for beginning the traditional effort to merge their general election efforts with Mr. Romney’s Boston-based campaign. The decision by Mr. Santorum will make that easier.

It also could clear the way for Mr. Santorum to play a bigger role — and have a potentially bigger voice — in Mr. Romney’s campaign and perhaps in a Romney administration.

Katharine Q. Seelye and Jeff Zeleny contributed reporting.




Red Menace

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#2 7 years ago

He was looking to lose his home state of Pennsylvania which he was really hedging his bets on winning and his disabled daughter was recently hospitalized. It seemed like a politically convenient time to bow out.


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Commissar MercZ

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#3 7 years ago
Red Menace;5632041He was looking to lose his home state of Pennsylvania which he was really hedging his bets on winning and his disabled daughter was recently hospitalized. It seemed like a politically convenient time to bow out.

Yes, that's what my impression was too. It gave him a means to exist, especially since now I believe his daugther was released from the hospital now. As things stand in Pennsylvania and his inability to post results outside of a bible belt area, as well as difficulties with matching the fundraising and campaign infrastructure that Romney has, staying in any longer would've been a significant uphill batlte with little chance of a significant return.




SeinfeldisKindaOk

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#4 7 years ago

I have no idea what many of his political policies were though I hear they were more in line with traditional Republican ones than Romney's are. In my eyes, his personal beliefs and behavior make him unsuitable for any level of office.




Commissar MercZ

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#5 7 years ago
SeinfeldisKindaOk;5632189I have no idea what many of his political policies were though I hear they were more in line with traditional Republican ones than Romney's are. In my eyes, his personal beliefs and behavior make him unsuitable for any level of office.

He was pretty much the embodiment of the 'Christian Right' in its most fundamental form which I think is n important part of the Republican base. How that translates into a candidate that can affect a swing state though, that's a different story. He wasn't showing that too well in primaries outside of the bible belt and that didn't make him an overwhelming 'favorite' despite the 'come from behind' (no pun intended) image he was trying to play.




Pethegreat VIP Member

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#6 7 years ago
He was looking to lose his home state of Pennsylvania which he was really hedging his bets on winning and his disabled daughter was recently hospitalized. It seemed like a politically convenient time to bow out.

Good riddance. Few people in PA like him, and he lost his senate seat in 2006 for a reason. He had a house in VA where his kids lived, but he was sending them to cyber school in Penn Hills, PA. This cost the Penn Hills school district $73,000. He had a house in Penn Hills, but he did not live there. On the zanier side of things he brought home a stillborn baby his wife had and slept with it.

The republicans are going to loose big this November. Democrats and most independents think the party is crazy with a few exceptions. Sadly, this loss won't moderate the republican party. Romney, which many consider much more conservative and McCain, will loose in November. There will be cries from the base to run an even more conservative candidate in 2016. Hopefully the GOP will get the message in 2016 that running bible thumpers will not lead to election victories.




Warborg

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#7 7 years ago
Pethegreat;5632392 Hopefully the GOP will get the message in 2016 that running bible thumpers will not lead to election victories.

Show me one POTUS that has claimed to be atheist.

Even the idiot in office now claims to be a Christian.




Pethegreat VIP Member

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#8 7 years ago

Warborg;5632407Show me one POTUS that has claimed to be atheist.

Even the idiot in office now claims to be a Christian.

The difference is that the guy in office right now does not claim that God told him to run for president.




Nittany Tiger Forum Mod

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#9 7 years ago

Isn't Romney the Republican candidate with the most campaign money raised right now?




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#10 7 years ago

Warborg;5632407Show me one POTUS that has claimed to be atheist.

Even the idiot in office now claims to be a Christian.

Of course, anyone can claim to be Christian. If you went around gang-banging old women, you might possibly qualify as a bad Christian. But it's a cheap claim. You can say you're Christian and get some votes from the right - and you can not practice Christianity and get some votes from the left.

The further you swing out towards either extreme, the less votes you're likely to get - because only a few people are really extremely Christian or really extremely atheist. Most people just don't take religion particularly seriously.

I might be inclined to vote for a candidate who stood up when asked about his beliefs and said, "Low prior probability, no supporting evidence - if you believe that, you're nuts." But how many people would even understand him? And how many people would endorse those sort of epistemic standards as a desirable thing to factor into their voting behaviour? I don't know - I suspect fewer than would understand him if he just said 'Yeah, Christian.'




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