[ScienceDaily Article] Polar Permafrosts May Release Large Amounts Of Greenhouse Gases 5 replies

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Asheekay

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#1 5 years ago

With the growing global warming, there is a real risk of the permafrost glaciers thawing and releasing excessive amounts of greenhouse gases (oxides of carbon and nitrogen) which would further increase the thawing (melting) process and hence facilitate further release of these agents until theoretically all of the permafrosts have melted and all these agents have leaked into the atmosphere.

Not-so-permanent permafrost: 850 billion tons of carbon stored in frozen Arctic ground could be released

This is just one example where all of the people of the earth suffer the outcomes of the doings of some of its residents.




Kamikazee

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#2 5 years ago

There have been similar concerns about CO2 stored in oceans. If this is true global warming would turn into a self reinforcing process. Well, more so than it already is.




Asheekay

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#3 5 years ago

Yes. With the increase in temperature, the solubility of gases in liquids starts decreasing. So as the temperatures rise, the carbon dioxide in the oceans would start escaping into the atmosphere.

But as far as I think, in the case of the oceans, its not this carbon dioxide release which is threatening but the decrease of dissolved oxygen in the ocean waters. As majority of marine animals breathe this dissolved oxygen, a lack in its levels would mean global scale decreases in the populations of fishes, mollusks, octapeds, plankton and theoretically every marine creature.

Interestingly, geologists tell us that there have been times when the ocean levels were 40 feet higher than what they are today and the temperature of the earth was also higher. But surprisingly, the oceans of those eras were teeming with diverse forms of life.




Mr. Matt VIP Member

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#4 5 years ago

That's because glaciers and the polar icecaps shouldn't actually be there, at least not in the quantities they're currently at. They're the last vestiges of the ice age we're currently reaching the end of. We're just speeding the process along a bit. Earth was considerably warmer prior to their existence.




Asheekay

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#5 5 years ago

I think it was in the Permian Era that the earth reached its highest mean temperature. I'm not dead sure of it though.

Glaciers have always been present at the poles though. Not in as huge amounts as they are now, however.

Inspite of all the advancement in the field of geology, we still don't know what triggers an ice age and what marks its end.




Mr. Matt VIP Member

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#6 5 years ago

We'll know what marks the end of this one when the Netherlands are under water though!