Scientists believe they've found life on Mars 34 replies

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Serio VIP Member

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#1 10 years ago

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/scienceandtechnology/science/sciencenews/4244904/Life-on-Mars-A-factfile.htmlSpacecraft orbiting the planet detected a haze of methane surrounding the planet.

Scientists now think that the gas is being produced by microbes living just below the soil.

Nasa is expected to confirm its presence during a briefing at their Washington HQ.

The possibility of life on the Red Planet has been the subject of speculation for more than a century.

Here are some of the most interesting scientific discoveries that have been made about the planet.

- It is named after the Roman god of war and is the fourth planet from the sun.

- It can be seen from Earth with the naked eye and has two moons, Phobos and Deimos.

- Its reddish appearance is due to iron oxide, more commonly known as rust.

- Mars' two polar ice caps are made largely of ice. The volume of water ice in the south polar ice cap, if melted, would cover the entire planet to a depth of 36 feet (11 metres).

- It is the site of the highest known mountain in the Solar System, Olympus Mons, which, at 16 miles tall (26 km), is around three times the height of Mount Everest.

- It is also home to the largest canyon in the Solar System, Valles Marineris, which is around 2,500 miles (4,000km) wide and 4.5 miles (7km) deep.

- The planet is host to three functional orbiting spacecraft; Mars Odyssey, Mars Express and the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter - more than any other planet in the Solar System.

- It is less than a third the size of Earth, with a surface area of 90 million square miles compared to 317 million square miles.

- Average temperatures on the planet are -51F (-46C), compared to (57F) 14C on earth.

- Around 43,000 impact craters have been found on the planet that are more than three miles (5 km) wide. One of these, the Hellas impact basin, is clearly visible from Earth.

NASA, calm down for a minute. Yesterday, booming. Today, life. Tomorrow, who knows?




faro0485

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#2 10 years ago
Serio;4770710NASA, calm down for a minute. Yesterday, booming. Today, life. Tomorrow, who knows?

Either way, it either proves that there is life on Mars... or that there's Abiogenic methaine on mars.




GhostIV

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#3 10 years ago

Meh, while that is fascinating and makes me sorta intrested in mars again, I think I'll wait until the official announcement that we're going to terraform mars and colonize it before I start getting excited.




nemitis

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#4 10 years ago
GhostIV;4770761Meh, while that is fascinating and makes me sorta intrested in mars again, I think I'll wait until the official announcement that we're going to terraform mars and colonize it before I start getting excited.

that probably wont happen in our lifetime. and even if it does it still wont be liveable for a much longer time.




GhostIV

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#5 10 years ago
nemitis;4770790that probably wont happen in our lifetime....

Thats where advancing medical technology and cryonics come in. Yay advanced science and technology.




faro0485

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#6 10 years ago
GhostIV;4770791Thats where advancing medical technology and cryonics come in. Yay advanced science and technology.

There are organic methods... I believe they call it "children".




emonkies

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#7 10 years ago

Not likely to be able to Terraform Mars.

Mar's core has cooled too much and no longer has the fluidic dynamo that creates earths magnetic fields.

Thus, Mars does not have a strong enough magnetic field to create a Van Allen belt to protect it's surface from Cosmic Winds nor to hold its atmosphere in.

You would have to build cities underground or build domed or enclosed cities.

The temperature is low and the air pressure is so low that the poles are frozen. Find a way to up the air pressure or raise the temperature and the poles would melt.




GhostIV

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#8 10 years ago
faro0485;4770850There are organic methods... I believe they call it "children".[/quote] Which won't actually be me though. I want to be there in person. :D [quote=Anlushac11;4771222]Not likely to be able to Terraform Mars. Mar's core has cooled too much and no longer has the fluidic dynamo that creates earths magnetic fields. Thus, Mars does not have a strong enough magnetic field to create a Van Allen belt to protect it's surface from Cosmic Winds nor to hold its atmosphere in. You would have to build cities underground or build domed or enclosed cities. The temperature is low and the air pressure is so low that the poles are frozen. Find a way to up the air pressure or raise the temperature and the poles would melt.

I'm sure future humans will find a way. ;) Besides, even if they can't. I wouldn't mind something like Total Recall.




NiteStryker

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#9 10 years ago
nemitis;4770790that probably wont happen in our lifetime. and even if it does it still wont be liveable for a much longer time.

I did a whole report on Mars a few years ago in my senior year, and a self-sustaining Mars colony is not forseeable for a good 2 or 3 centuries. Even warming up the planet with orbital mirrors would take a hundred years to bring it up to just 'cold" temperatures.

I would consider the theroy that Mars was once a earth-like planet but just drifted too far from the sun and shit hit the fan.

I am shocked and amazed that those 2 rovers are still working after 5 years. They have only moved 13 miles, but that is amazing. If we ever get to Mars, you know those little battlebots are coming home and being put in the Smithsonian. ...or they will get stolen by Martians and used as RC cars.




AlDaja

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#10 10 years ago
I would consider the theroy that Mars was once a earth-like planet but just drifted too far from the sun and shit hit the fan.

Well that may be possible, but it is more feasible that Mars became geologically inactive. Our own planet has proven that geological activitiy (i.e. volcanic eruptions) replenish the atmosphere and biosphere. Combined with inactivity and a smaller gravitational pull crucial oxyen and nitorgen atoms over several centuries would have bled off into space rendering the plant susceptible to radiation from the sun.