Sedition - Thoughtcrime? 4 replies

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masked_marsoe VIP Member

Heaven's gonna burn your eyes

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16th April 2005

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#1 11 years ago

Sedition, an outdated suppression of free speech, or an essential tool in building national unity and pride?

WikipediaPut simply, sedition is the stirring up of rebellion against the government in power.

And in law (Crimes Act 1961 of New Zealand; Section 81):

Spoiler: Show
81tab.gifSeditious offences defined (1)tab.gifA seditious intention is an intention— (a)tab.gifTo bring into hatred or contempt, or to excite disaffection against, Her Majesty, or the Government of New Zealand, or the administration of justice; or (b)tab.gifTo incite the public or any persons or any class of persons to attempt to procure otherwise than by lawful means the alteration of any matter affecting the Constitution, laws, or Government of New Zealand; or (c)tab.gifTo incite, procure, or encourage violence, lawlessness, or disorder; or (d)tab.gifTo incite, procure, or encourage the commission of any offence that is prejudicial to the public safety or to the maintenance of public order; or (e)tab.gifTo excite such hostility or ill will between different classes of persons as may endanger the public safety. (2)tab.gifWithout limiting any other legal justification, excuse, or defence available to any person charged with any offence, it is hereby declared that no one shall be deemed to have a seditious intention only because he intends in good faith— (a)tab.gifTo show that Her Majesty has been misled or mistaken in her measures; or (b)tab.gifTo point out errors or defects in the Government or Constitution of New Zealand, or in the administration of justice; or to incite the public or any persons or any class of persons to attempt to procure by lawful means the alteration of any matter affecting the Constitution, laws, or Government of New Zealand; or (c)tab.gifTo point out, with a view to their removal, matters producing or having a tendency to produce feelings of hostility or ill will between different classes of persons. (3)tab.gifA seditious conspiracy is an agreement between 2 or more persons to carry into execution any seditious intention. (4)tab.gifFor the purposes of sections 83 to 85 of this Act,— To publish means to communicate to the public or to any person or persons, whether in writing, or orally, or by any representation, or by any means of reproduction whatsoever: Statement includes words, writing, pictures, or any significant expression or representation whatsoever; and also includes any reproduction, by any means whatsoever, of any statement.

Sedition laws are still active in many nations in the West; New Zealand will be abolishing its laws probably by the end of the year, I'm predicting a near-absolute majority.

However, Australia recently re-introduced its sedition laws in 2005 as part of a range of anti-terrorism laws.

And here in lies the issue for modern sedition. It becomes possible, even predictable that ordinary people to be jailed for thoughtcrimes, related to terrorism or not. Sedition is more than just war-time censorship, it is the expansion of crimethink.




Hellknight1993

I don't spend enough time here

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11th May 2009

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#2 11 years ago
masked_marsoe;3715980Sedition, an outdated suppression of free speech, or an essential tool in building national unity and pride?

We just used to call it anarchy! :nodding:




Nemmerle Forum Mod

Voice of joy and sunshine

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26th May 2003

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#3 11 years ago

I would have thought sedition to be an essential element of democracy.




Guest

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#4 11 years ago

In theory Sedition is only supposed to cover LYING to try to incite rebellion, and I think such a law makes perfect sense. But yeah I agree with the previous posts that speaking out against the government should never be a crime unless somehow it endangers someone(I can't think of a scenario where this would be the case)




Locomotor

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#5 11 years ago

Good thread Marcel, just what I needed. :)

That is some genuinely amusing reading. There have been measures in the US of the same variety, such as the Seditions Act(s) over the centuries and decades. I forgot when the most reason one was, doesn't really matter.Governments anywhere, whether totalitarian or "democratically" elected, never really tolerate much of this.

NemmerleI would have thought sedition to be an essential element of democracy.[/QUOTE] Real democracy, correct. But if you look at any political power structures functioning today, you know how much real democracy they tolerate. Some more than others of course. [QUOTE=masked_marsoe]However, Australia recently re-introduced its sedition laws in 2005 as part of a range of anti-terrorism laws.

That's terrible! I'm presently curious about the status of such "national security" measures in the US.