Should people stop ripping other people off? 15 replies

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Whiteshield

No retreat, No surrender!

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20th April 2008

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#1 10 years ago

I know this might be uncommon, but should there be a law for people who sell ripoffs?




NCC1017spock

I take what n0e says way too seriously

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24th April 2007

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#2 10 years ago

ok, well this is pointless. And I think it would cost to much money, man power, and effort to do such a thing.... Because lots of people rip off other people.




Junk angel

Huh, sound?

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28th January 2007

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#3 10 years ago

Uh, there are normally laws against false advertisements. So in a way, these laws are already in place.




emonkies

I'm too cool to Post

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16th July 2003

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#4 10 years ago

IIRC there are already a number of laws addressing that.

Fraud come to mind.




NCC1017spock

I take what n0e says way too seriously

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24th April 2007

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#5 10 years ago

I though he ment like selling some random Item for 5 dollars more then the real cost.




Whiteshield

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20th April 2008

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#6 10 years ago
NCC1017spock;4328861I though he ment like selling some random Item for 5 dollars more then the real cost.

yeah, that's what I mean. I mean, seriously, in my country I can't buy LEGO for it's real price. A $14 LEGO kit's price in america is upsized to $30.




Captain Fist

DEUS LO VULT

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17th December 2005

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#7 10 years ago

What are you talking about? If it's a corporation or some other large organization, and if it's blatant, near-propaganda advertisements, there should be some punishments, but if there's some guy selling Halo 4 two years prior to the release date for $5,000 on a street corner and it turns out to be a retextured Halo 2, it's the consumer's own fault. The same goes for ridiculously jacked up legitimate goods.




Nemmerle Forum Mod

Voice of joy and sunshine

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26th May 2003

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#8 10 years ago

You always sell above production costs and sales costs, that's where profit comes in. Get rid of ripping people off and there's no reason to trade with you.




rebornintheglory

keyboard warrior

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20th January 2006

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#9 10 years ago

It's Capitalism. Should there be a law against that? Well... some people think so. :D




XCON_Faxion

I spend too much time here

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10th July 2003

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#10 10 years ago

There are several laws depending on how you approach it.

Looking at U.S. contract law, -If the seller misrepresented the goods intentionally with the intent to deceive (scienter), then its fraud and you can sue for damages. -If they misrepresented by mistake then you can return it, you can only sue for damages if the deal was for goods under UCC. Service based deals only allow return of subject matter (consideration) -If the deal is heavily one sided, one party had far superior bargaining power and it would unconscionable to enforce it then the deal is voidable. -Anything sold by a merchant that violates copywrite, patent, or trademarks are in violation of Warranty of Title and can be revoked unless the merchant disclaims them. -Anything sold by a merchant must be suitable for the particular purpose a buyer intends to use it for if the seller knew at the time of the sale the buyer's intended purpose and relied on the seller's judgment in deciding which product the buyer should get. Failure to do so is in violation of Implied Warranty unless it is disclaimed.

However you cannot return a product due to buyer's remorse if there is nothing wrong with it. So if you get ripped off by a car dealerships and get charged $10,000 grand over the sticker price there is no saving you.




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