The English language 35 replies

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Admiral Donutz VIP Member

Wanna go Double Dutch?

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9th December 2003

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#11 14 years ago
'[+Glasius+']IMO, as long as the information is understood by the receiver it does not really matter.

But how do you know where this "border" is? You don't have to follow the official grammer rules 100% but you must try to stick to the rules! I find it very annoying to read a post that is full of l33t, official abbreviations, unofficial abbreviations and sentences where words are left/cut out. If i'm not that intrested in a topic or the layout of the text seems totally screwed, then i often skip parts of the post or even the entire post. People who have english as there primairy languages should atleast try to stick to the rules, you can't blame people (like me) who have english as a second language for making typos or "ignoring"the grammar rules. But even then we still have the fact that people make accidentle typo's because people type to fast and don't check there post. I often make this error: I type a post/reply, submit it and check back some time later and often i'm ashamed for the typos i made, stupid and obvious typos... they make me feel stupid :( . BTW: what's up with the use of the word "dutch" (infront of a couple of other words) to refer to something bad/poor? It's just plain stupid, it must have some historical background/roots... can someone enlighten me?




Zab

BROtastic

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30th March 2003

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#12 14 years ago

What do you mean Dutchman? :p Well, I think if you understand the slang(real slang, not that l33t computer talk shat) you will become better at English. Come here sometime, if you don't know some of the slang, you'll be lost in some of the sayings, and phrases spoken. As long as it's not ebonics shit, it's fine. If you can understand the slag we actually use, and have a good understanding of 'high English(perfect grammar, etc)'..you'll be sucessful. :) EDIT: Donitz, now that I've thought about it...in the English language there are some..phrases that have to do with 'Dutch' ---which are derogatory..(not many are prevalent today) Here's one.. In England, going Dutch means going for a cheaper option, or splitting a restaurant bill between the two parties. Phrases using Dutch were created because the Netherlands used to be a great rival to England (especially the Dutch East India Company), and generally Dutch phrases show Dutchmen in a bad light. See also Anglo-Dutch Wars.




Mast3rofPuppets VIP Member

08'aIgnorance is not an excuse

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28th November 2003

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#13 14 years ago

I had a 13 pages long english test a few days ago, it was fairly easy.

The most of the questions was like this:

Annie a)drink b)drank c)drunk a glass of juice.

etc.




Zab

BROtastic

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30th March 2003

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#14 14 years ago
Mast3rofPuppetsI had a 13 pages long english test a few days ago, it was fairly easy. The most of the questions was like this: Annie a)drink b)drank c)drunk a glass of juice. etc.

It is better this way..MoP... Most of the questions were like this: ;)




Mast3rofPuppets VIP Member

08'aIgnorance is not an excuse

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28th November 2003

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#15 14 years ago

Haha ^^




[+Glasius+] VIP Member

THE snowman

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23rd January 2000

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#16 14 years ago

My "border" is when I stop understanding the meaning of the message.

EDIT: I normally try to write so people understand me, so I guess my experiences are from enterperating others mumbo-jumbo..




Admiral Donutz VIP Member

Wanna go Double Dutch?

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#17 14 years ago

thanks Zab! Did you know that old english was very simular to dutch (dutch was more related to old english then to german, and people say that dutch and german look a like).: history on the english language: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/English_language English words of dutch origin: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_English_words_of_Dutch_origin Word origins

One of the consequences of the French influence is that the vocabulary of English is, to a certain extent, divided between those words which are Germanic and those which are "Latinate". A computerized survey of about 80,000 words in the old Shorter Oxford Dictionary (3rd edition) was published in Ordered Profusion by Thomas Finkenstaedt and Dieter Wolff (1973) which estimated the origin of English words as follows:

  • Latin, including modern scientific and technical Latin: 28.24%
  • French, including Old French and early Anglo-French: 28.3%
  • Old and Middle English, Old Norse and Dutch: 25%
  • Greek: 5.32%
  • No etymology given: 4.03%
  • Derived from proper names: 3.28%
  • All other languages contributed less than 1%



AzH

I'm too cool to Post

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17th September 2003

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#18 14 years ago

Interesting or no, the origin of the word Quiz:

The story goes that a Dublin theatre proprietor by the name of Richard Daly made a bet that he could, within forty-eight hours, make a nonsense word known throughout the city, and that the public would give a meaning to it. After the performance one evening, he gave his staff cards with the word 'quiz' written on them, and told them to write the word on walls around the city. The next day the strange word was the talk of the town, and within a short time it had become part of the language. This picturesque tale appeared as an anecdote in 1836, but the most detailed account (in F. T. Porter's Gleanings and Reminiscences, 1875) gives the date of the exploit as 1791. The word, however, was already in use by then, meaning 'an odd or eccentric person', and had been used in this sense by Fanny Burney in her diary on 24 June 1782. 'Quiz' was also used as a name for a curious toy, something like a yo-yo and also called a bandalore, which was popular around 1790. The word is nevertheless hard to account for, and so is its later meaning of 'to question, to interrogate', which emerged in the mid-19th century and gave rise to the most common use of the term today, for an entertainment based on questions and answers.

Not alot of people know that...




Admiral Donutz VIP Member

Wanna go Double Dutch?

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#19 14 years ago

Hmm intresting! The history of english (and other languages) is quite intresting, too bad that the french language got involved :(




D.Sporky!

God Send Death

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10th January 2004

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#20 14 years ago

I don't mind if people spell stuff like "you" as "u". But if they don't use proper grammer, making their posts hard to read...that really annoys me, and I just usually ignore their posts.