The prevalence of Emoji and the evolution of language 5 replies

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Danny Über Admin

I'm spending a year dead for tax reasons.

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#1 1 week ago

So recently it became possible to use Emoji on number plates for cars in Australia.

It got me wondering about the evolution of language. Of course, language evolves over time, the way we speak now is nothing like it was 500 or even 100 years ago.

And during all this time, language has gotten shorter and more efficient, albeit arguably at the cost of it's elegance and romantic quality. This seems logical in an ever faster and more on demand world.

But my worry is, could Emoji be a new language? Are we looking at the alphabet of the future?


Danny King | Community Manager | GameFront.com



Lindale Forum Mod

Mister Angry Rules Guy

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#2 1 week ago

I see it as exactly the opposite. It is the textbook example of Millennials being lazy, and wanting to find shortcuts to everything. It started with text slang, and degraded into smily faces. If anything, emojis symbolise the death of written language.


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Lysdestic VIP Member

Dr. Professor Logic, PhD.

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#3 1 week ago

I don't really worry about it anymore. I used to be uptight about typing properly on the web, and while I can still be quite pedantic, I've learned to live and let live, I guess.

I've found in business settings that informal chats with less capitalization and a few tongue emotes relay the intended emotions that when written otherwise could convey too much of a stick in the ass.

It's ain't really a problem, y'all.   




Danny Über Admin

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#4 1 week ago
Posted by Lysdestic

I don't really worry about it anymore. I used to be uptight about typing properly on the web, and while I can still be quite pedantic, I've learned to live and let live, I guess.

I've found in business settings that informal chats with less capitalization and a few tongue emotes relay the intended emotions that when written otherwise could convey too much of a stick in the ass.

It's ain't really a problem, y'all.   


u r such a sellout


Danny King | Community Manager | GameFront.com



Lysdestic VIP Member

Dr. Professor Logic, PhD.

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#5 1 week ago

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Mr. Matt VIP Member

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#6 1 week ago

Ah, kids these days. Downfall of civilisation, and suchlike.

Older generations have never ranted about such things before, and will never rant about such things again. It is this moment in time, right now, when the youngest generations are at their worst. 

Emojis represent an evolution in language in the same way that emoticons did when we were all using them right here (or... there... this whole forum is one big Ship of Theseus problem), or drawing them ourselves in text messages with colons and parentheses. As in, they don't. People have been illustrating their words with bullshit smiley faces since time immemorial. 

Here's an Emoji from 1741:


Smiley_1741_Hennet.jpg

'Emoji' is just a branded buzzword for the same sort of crap we've always done.




Last edited by Mr. Matt 1 week ago