The Space Race vs Civilisation 37 replies

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Flash525

The Carbon Comrade

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14th July 2004

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#1 8 years ago

Not specifically the space race between the United States and Russia, because we've already had that; The United States won, but more to the point of colonizing our Moon and Mars, and eventually escaping our solar system.

The specific question: Are we likely to ever actually make it, or is our industry and technological process moving along too slow?

Earth only has so much in the resource department to share with us. Coal isn't half as common as it once was, and Oil is proving more and more difficult to acquire. Granted we've not used up all our coal or oil, no doubt there are still many places on the planet to acquire such, it's just more difficult to get too, and eventually, we will run out.

I doubt very much that our planet has an everlasting supply.

But yeah, the question, as mentioned above, are we likely to ever actually make it, or is our industry and technological process moving along too slow? By the time we figure out how to get to these places, and have the technology to terraform other rocks, are we going to have the fuel to actually get there?




Mihail VIP Member

President of Novistrana

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19th January 2003

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#2 8 years ago
Earth only has so much in the resource department to share with us. Coal isn't half as common as it once was, and Oil is proving more and more difficult to acquire. Granted we've not used up all our coal or oil, no doubt there are still many places on the planet to acquire such, it's just more difficult to get too, and eventually, we will run out.

The planet actually creates much of the oil and coal that is on the surface of the planet, but at the rate we consume it, the supply that we can actually reach will drain far too quickly in my mind before we have alternative technology due to the lack of emphasis on finding and creating alternative power.

By the time we figure out how to get to these places, and have the technology to terraform other rocks, are we going to have the fuel to actually get there?

Untill the world stops using personal profit as a driving force for day to day lives of humans, nothing will happen, we shall stagnate as a civilization till either nuclear war due to dwindling resources or we dig ourselves into too deep of a hole and we flood the planet with the melted ice caps.




jackripped

People say I post too much

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2nd December 2009

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#3 8 years ago

We might live under domes on Mars but thats about it, radiation is so much stronger there, so with domes were limited to very slower growth on trhat planet. lts hard to predict space advances, they are so slow , but could be so fast if humans really put there minds to it. The space race never ends, the US won the cold war , round one basically, round two is china.....




Sadim-Al-Bouncer

shaken - not stirred

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9th June 2009

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#4 8 years ago

I doubt we'll ever get a self-sufficient colony built anywhere in space, probably not even just a small outpost either. People and government simply don't care much about space anymore and don't see its significance. Humanity will either be exterminated or pushed back to a technological dark ages before a colony is ever established.




Nemmerle Forum Mod

Voice of joy and sunshine

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26th May 2003

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#5 8 years ago

The main problem with space is economic. Before the invention of the micro-processor there were designs and funding lining up to put quite large space stations in orbit to fulfil many of the same functions that satellites do today. I think you need to change human physiology - and by that the way in which we centre our economic activities - before space will really be attractive.




Pethegreat VIP Member

Lord of the Peach

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19th April 2004

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#6 8 years ago
The specific question: Are we likely to ever actually make it, or is our industry and technological process moving along too slow?

Seeing as the private space industry is starting to get somewhere now(NASA contracts, Spaceshiptwo) things will be picking up quickly. A private company won't continue receive funding if they don't deliver on their promises. NASA has not delivered on its promises over the years, yet they continue to get money.

Currently there are only 3 organizations that are capable of launching commercial satellites; NASA, RFSA(Russian space agency) and the ESA. As a result there is very little competition, and costs are high. Private companies capable of launching people/cargo into space will increase competition and lower costs in the near future.




AlDaja

SFC III Troubleshooter.

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#7 8 years ago
Sadim-Al-Bouncer;5415281I doubt we'll ever get a self-sufficient colony built anywhere in space, probably not even just a small outpost either. People and government simply don't care much about space anymore and don't see its significance. Humanity will either be exterminated or pushed back to a technological dark ages before a colony is ever established.

Unfortunately, this is probably more true than many would like to admit. Isacc Asmov suggested that silly superstitions and greed will continue to limit humanity. So far, he has yet to be disproven. Just look around. Right now we have greed imps on the left and right clambering for power globally, and if not the secular types attempting to take each other out politically, we have the religious fanatics bent on killing us all. An old story dating back to early civilization, so not much has changed. We are truly f'cked.




emonkies

I'm too cool to Post

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17th July 2003

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#8 8 years ago

What I picture is robotic mining equipment mining the asteroid belt and shipping the material to earth or to the moon for collection and processing.

IMHO humans will never colonize Mars until we can develop a propulsion system that cuts the transit time from months and years to days and weeks.

Then what you will most likely see is research and mining missions with duration limited by the effects on the human body. Domes and underground bases are most likely.

Venus would be a better choice to colonize and put domes on as its surface as its gravity is much closer to Earths. Just have to deal with the crushing pressure (92x that of Earth at sea level - about 16lbs per sq in.), 96% carbon dioxide atmosphere, 900deg surface temperature, Sulfuric acid rain, and lethal doses of radiation due to lack of strong planetary magnetic fields. Sounds like the makings of a cozy little homestead. Also that pesky little problem of Venus having a 243 day rotation cycle, longer than a Venusian year of 224 days.

It is far more likely that humanity will collapse and we will devolve into a race of Barbarians with Warlords and Kings competing for power and resources and attempting to control access to Lostech, the advanced technology left over from a Civilization forgotten.

Given time most of the resoruces will be recycled by the Earth and man will begin his rise to civilization again and the cycle begins anew.

Assuming the world isn't destroyed in a nuclear fire first.




Keyser_Soze

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#9 8 years ago

[QUOTE=Anlushac11;5415721]What I picture is robotic mining equipment mining the asteroid belt and shipping the material to earth or to the moon for collection and processing.

IMHO humans will never colonize Mars until we can develop a propulsion system that cuts the transit time from months and years to days and weeks.

every year, the boundaries of impossibility seem to be being shifted, it wouldn't surprise me if one day, that may be a bit more possible.

Venus would be a better choice to colonize and put domes on as its surface as its gravity is much closer to Earths. Just have to deal with the crushing pressure (92x that of Earth at sea level - about 16lbs per sq in.), 96% carbon dioxide atmosphere, 900deg surface temperature, Sulfuric acid rain, and lethal doses of radiation due to lack of strong planetary magnetic fields. Sounds like the makings of a cozy little homestead. Also that pesky little problem of Venus having a 243 day rotation cycle, longer than a Venusian year of 224 days.

venus is basically an extreme version of what earth could become if we kept using carbon fuels, right? (albeit to a lesser extent) at that temperature, i think it's entirely unfeasible to colonise venus. domes would either be crushed or melted, if not both and it would be horrendously unprofitable even if it was possible.

Given time most of the resoruces will be recycled by the Earth and man will begin his rise to civilization again and the cycle begins anew.

won't that take millions of years? as you go on to say, we'll likely destroy most life on earth and humanity through nukes before then, which would undoubtedly create a venus-like atmosphere on earth.




AlDaja

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#10 8 years ago
won't that take millions of years? as you go on to say, we'll likely destroy most life on earth and humanity through nukes before then, which would undoubtedly create a venus-like atmosphere on earth.

Nuclear weapons would not produce a Venus-like atmosphere on earth. It may irradicate large population and biology but the Earth would recover and move on. At most it would produce high levels of ionization in our atmosphere that would dispate over time. Our planet in recent geological history had an equivalent 2.5 megaton nuclear explosion (150 times that of Hiroshima and Nagasaki) that impacted Arizona 50 thousand years ago and life went on.