The Stop Online Piracy Act 79 replies

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Nemmerle Forum Mod

Voice of joy and sunshine

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#71 7 years ago

Those of you who don't mind clearly marking yourself as targets, might want to go and sign this.

https://wwws.whitehouse.gov/petitions/!/petition/investigate-chris-dodd-and-mpaa-bribery-after-he-publicly-admited-bribing-politicans-pass/DffX0YQv




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#72 7 years ago

Surely the most "honorable" senator from my home state would never take a bribe or blackmail others. :rolleyes:

Honestly, the man is a crook and ought to be in jail already, this is just another item on a long list of disgusting behavior for Chris Dodd. Yet we allow him and fellow scumbag Barney Frank to oversee important financial reform committees and such.




Commissar MercZ

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#73 7 years ago
redgroupclan;5603557The war isn't over. SOPA is theoretically dead. As a "f-you", they took down MegaUpload. Now, just to put icing on the cake, they've introduced 2 new bills: The Protecting Children from Internet Pornography Act of 2011 & Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement. Lovely thing about PCIPA (aside from the dangerously broad language and the oldest political trick of "what about the children?") is opposing it will automatically bring in "So you're in FAVOR of child pornography?" We can't let ourselves get tired. We just have to get through this one more hurdle and it'll all be over. Either these corporation-driven politicians will give up or they'll go in for a THIRD run, in which case the Internet will really put its foot down and start doing something more physical & effective. If you're old enough to vote, make sure you know who to vote for and who to not vote for.

Yes, this is important. While they have shelved the bills they have not abandoned the idea. The problem is they'll probably begin narrowing the the reasons for the bill even more so as to make it a case of solely piracy. They tried to do that this time around, but even those who were concerned about piracy did not like what the bill(s) provided, either due to the infeasibility or scope.

The thing about child pronography is intentional- after all the angle that these things bills are meant to only fight piracy rings that are harming the US economy and jobs will be harped again and again, though they might be able to find a way to make it a more convincing argument. The co-sponsors of the bill even managed to bring in the usual bit of 'support the troops' deal by saying that this includes removing software and such that could hurt US operations overseas.

Another problem might come in the sense that those who lined up opposing the bill need to educate and spread the word about net neutrality and other related topics- get people to see the bigger picture. The problem is at some point groups like Google are going to be fine with these things as long as it doesn't infringe on their operations- then it'll be up to just common users to get things going.




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#74 7 years ago

Now this campaign to stop online piracy is most unwelcomed. Prices are not fair. There are necessities that must come before commerce. I have used keygens and cracks to facilitate many programs on my computer. It´s because I have that I am here. My existence in this world was less than frutiful before I became as bold as I am now. I would like to think others are smart enough to share this belief.




Asheekay

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#75 7 years ago

Oh. One more important question:

There is word on the street that Mozilla has already started integrating some sort of proxy server settings in its Firefox browser that would allow users to forego the SOPA restraints (For websites outside USA obviously. Those inside USA would be dead by the morning in case the bill passes).

Question is: Would US congress also deem it illegal to use Firefox web browser in case it the bill passes and Firefox goes on with its proxy service?

How far is the US government going to push the matter? Its a US-corporations vs The-Rest-Of-The-World scenario.




Commissar MercZ

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#76 7 years ago

Asheekay;5604125Oh. One more important question:

There is word on the street that Mozilla has already started integrating some sort of proxy server settings in its Firefox browser that would allow users to forego the SOPA restraints (For websites outside USA obviously. Those inside USA would be dead by the morning in case the bill passes).

Question is: Would US congress also deem it illegal to use Firefox web browser in case it the bill passes and Firefox goes on with its proxy service?

How far is the US government going to push the matter? Its a US-corporations vs The-Rest-Of-The-World scenario.

I think when it comes down to piracy, it's not exclusively a US thing. We've seen some other countries consider and pass various measures to try and curb piracy in their respective countries. Off the top my head, there are some countries where internet providers are obligated to screen their users for illicit activity and report them, some taking that to the level of the 'three-strikes' rule, others with the 'Artist Tax' on certain types of writable media like CDs, hard-drives, etc., and so on. The US has definitely has an interest in pushing and encouraging such legislation, as is the case with ACTA (which is coming along without much trouble, apparently). There was some news awhile back too about how some wikileaks cables showed the US's influence in New Zealand's anti-piracy laws.

As to your question, I'm not sure. The US could possibly order Mozilla to stop offering that feature, which Mozilla might just do. They might on the other hand though, stating that since they are open-source, any such add-ons by the community is beyond their control. Though that also depends on how much the US would want to bother pursuing that. China faces a similar issue with many of its internet users finding ways to easily circumvent the so-called "Great Firewall" .

Maybe someone could chime-in?




MoreGun89

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#77 7 years ago

funny-celebrity-pictures-freedom.jpg

Just saying, I hope we can shut any future bills down until the people trying to pass them can learn to Internet (teehee) and attempt to pass an actually intelligent bill that will not have an overall harmful effect.


Mother Banhammer



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#78 7 years ago

I wish we could reverse bills (down with PRO IP and DMCA).

Also, the petition to indict Chris Dodd, president of the MPAA, has already hit its signature quota. In all honestly, I hope he gets jailtime for bribery.




D3matt

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#79 7 years ago

Killer Kyle;5604257I wish we could reverse bills (down with PRO IP and DMCA).

Also, the petition to indict Chris Dodd, president of the MPAA, has already hit its signature quota. In all honestly, I hope he gets jailtime for bribery.

:banned:Unfortunately, that'll probably not happen, but we can dream.




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#80 7 years ago
D3matt;5604326:banned:Unfortunately, that'll probably not happen, but we can dream.

When it is said that something will probably not happen, I have to wander just how strong the ability to envision the future is of the person who says such a thing. You I don´t know personally, but if this is your opinion, you can´t be very inspiring company. Dreams are the foundation of any enterprise, for better or worse. If we fail to acheive them, so be it. The efforts we make to accomplish our ends are enough to make others attempt to fulfil them.